Navigation Links
Blood-vessel blocker aids cancer-killing virus
Date:11/27/2007

COLUMBUS, Ohio Cancer-killing viruses are a promising therapy for incurable brain tumors, but their effectiveness has been limited in part because immune cells rapidly move in and eliminate them.

That immune response might be slowed, and the virus given more time to kill cancer cells, by blocking the growth of blood vessels in the tumor, new research here suggests.

The animal study indicates that pretreatment with an antiangiogenic agent a drug that blocks blood-vessel growth might improve the effectiveness of cancer-killing viruses.

The study, led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, is published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute with an accompanying editorial.

Our work suggest that antiangiogenic agents can reduce virus-induced inflammation in brain-tumor tissue and improve the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic virus therapy by lengthening the time it takes the immune system to clear the virus, says principal investigator Balveen Kaur, assistant professor of neurological surgery.

Much additional work is needed to validate these findings in other tumor models, but we hope that our findings will eventually be translated into clinical trials and one day help patients.

Kaur and her colleagues set out to learn how a cancer-killing, or oncolytic, virus affected the blood vessels in a brain-tumor model.

Kazuhiko Kurozumi, a visiting research scholar from Japan in Kaurs laboratory, first implanted rat glioma cells into the brains of several groups of rats. Seven days later, he injected a cancer-killing virus, called hrR3, into the growing tumors. This virus is a modified form of herpes simplex virus type 1 that reproduces and kills only tumor cells.

The virus caused the tumor blood vessels to become significantly more leaky compared with tumor blood vessels from control animals, and high numbers of white blood cells immune cells entered the tumor tissue.

The virus also triggered a twofold or greater change in the activity of 48 of 84 genes that are involved in inflammation and immune responses. Of those genes that were highly changed was the gene for interferon-gamma (IFNg), a substance important for coordinating immune responses to viral infections.

Together, these findings indicate that the oncolytic virus triggered a local immune response in the tumor that would curtail its effectiveness, Kaur says.

In other rats, the researchers injected into developing tumors an agent that blocks blood-vessel growth. Four days after that, they injected the virus into the tumors. The agent is called cRGD (cyclic peptide of arginine-glycine-aspartic).

Tumors in animals that received the agent had significantly fewer blood vessels than control animals (28 vs. 62 per area of tumor), and the vessels were significantly less leaky. Also, fewer immune cells were drawn to the tumor from the bloodstream.

Furthermore, the treated animals showed a more than twofold drop in the activity of 19 genes associated with inflammation, including the gene for IFNg.

Finally, animals pretreated with the blood-vessel-growth inhibitor lived an average of 21 days, while control animals that received only the virus lived 17 days.

The agent increased survival by about 23 percent, Kaur says, which means a lot because these tumors are very aggressive.


'/>"/>

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
darrell.ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Beta Blocker Doesnt Help Children With Heart Failure
2. How to design a cancer-killing virus
3. Virus Shows Some Cancer-Killing Abilities
4. Virus Could Help Drive Obesity
5. Scientists detect presence of marburg virus in african fruit bats
6. Norwalk virus: Cruise ship illness challenging and costly to hospitals, too
7. Human Papilloma Virus vaccines may decrease chances of oral cancer
8. New viruses to treat bacterial diseases -- My enemies enemy is my friend
9. FDA Approves New Roche West Nile Virus Blood Screening Test
10. Laser blasts viruses in blood
11. Bird Flu Virus Can Infect Fetus
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ProVest ... the greater Dallas, Miami, and Raleigh regions, is organizing an extended charity drive ... rare and deadly chromosome abnormality. , After struggling since birth with several health ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... , ... While it’s often important to take certain medications during the night, ... has identified a solution. , She developed a prototype for MOTION LIGHT-UP PILL BOX ... eliminates the need to turn on a light when taking medication during the night, ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... PurhealthRX , a leading Health and Nutrition Company, is announcing the ... spectrum CBD oil will revolutionize the rapidly growing CBD market by reducing the amount ... into liquid products, while reducing costs to end users. , The team of researchers ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... CT (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... long-term care services, staged a mock evacuation of the facility as part of a ... Shelton Fire Department, Echo Hose EMS and Shelton City Emergency Manager, as well as ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Ellevate Network, ... in business to advocate for action towards gender equality at their inaugural Summit in ... around the globe, and reached a social audience of over 3 million. To watch ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... Sept. 19, 2017   ZirMed Inc ., a recognized ... announced that it has been ranked #1 by its users ... Rankings 2017 User Survey. ZirMed was recognized as the ... hospitals and medical centers over 200 beds and holds one ... technology user survey history. ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... 18, 2017 EpiVax, Inc. ("EpiVax") ... and immune engineering, today announced a new ... (H7N9) vaccine. ... influenza and presents a challenge for traditional ... to be effective. Using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular ...
(Date:9/12/2017)... YORK , Sept. 12, 2017   EcoVadis , the leading ... has published the first annual edition of its Global CSR Risk and ... companies evaluated by EcoVadis, based on Scorecard Ratings that analyzed nearly 800,000 ... ... Index ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: