Navigation Links
Blood pressure diet works, but adherence drops among African-Americans
Date:9/18/2012

DURHAM, N.C. Better adherence to the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet is associated with significant reductions in blood pressure. However, African-Americans may be less likely than whites to adopt the diet, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center.

The findings, which appear online September 19 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, suggest that altering traditional recipes to meet nutritional guidelines rather than eliminating certain foods altogether may result in better adherence among African-Americans.

The DASH diet is recognized as the diet of choice for preventing and managing high blood pressure. The diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, and low fat dairy products, and is low in fats and cholesterol.

"Previous research, including results from our ENCORE study, established the DASH diet as an important approach for lowering blood pressure, and for some individuals, it may be an effective alternative to taking medication for hypertension," said James A. Blumenthal, PhD, professor of behavioral medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at Duke University Medical Center. "In this study we were interested in whether dietary adherence was related to blood pressure changes and what factors predicted who would adhere to the diet."

The study was a new analysis of data from the ENCORE trial, led by Duke researchers to evaluate the effectiveness of the DASH diet on cardiovascular health. Participants were 144 sedentary, overweight or obese adults, who had high blood pressure and were not taking medication.

Researchers measured a series of clinical and behavioral factors at the start of the study including blood pressure, weight, and physical fitness, as well as dietary habits. Depression, anxiety and social support were also evaluated as potential predictors of adherence to the regimen.

Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: the DASH diet alone; the DASH diet in combination with weight-loss counseling and aerobic exercise; or no change in diet and exercise habits.

After four months, participants in the group that got the DASH diet plus weight-loss counseling and exercise lost an average of 19 pounds, while weight remained stable in the other two groups.

Participants in both the DASH diet alone and DASH diet plus counseling groups had significant reductions in blood pressure, with greater adherence to the DASH diet resulting in the largest drops in blood pressure. The finding suggests that that following the DASH diet lowers blood pressure, independent of exercise and weight loss.

However, the addition of weight loss and exercise to the DASH diet promoted even greater reductions in blood pressure and improved other measures of cardiovascular health. "For overweight or obese patients with high blood pressure, clinicians should recommend the DASH diet in conjunction with exercise and weight loss for the best results," said Alan Hinderliter, MD, a cardiologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an investigator in this study.

The researchers noted that African-American participants were less likely than white participants to eat foods recommended in the DASH diet prior to beginning the study. While both African-American and white participants in the DASH treatment groups increased the amount of DASH foods they ate, African-Americans were less likely to adopt the DASH diet compared to their white counterparts. No other demographic, behavioral, or social variable predicted whether participants would adhere to the DASH diet.

"We need to be aware of cultural differences in dietary preferences in order to help people better adopt a DASH-friendly diet," Blumenthal said. "It is important to take into account traditional food choices and cooking practices when attempting to incorporate more DASH foods into daily meal plans."

Culturally sensitive changes to implementing the DASH diet, such as modifying traditional "soul food" recipes to meet nutritional recommendations rather than eliminating foods altogether, may result in better adherence among African-Americans.

"Given the success of the DASH diet, we know that changing lifestyles can make a significant difference in people's health," Blumenthal said. "And in the long run, if people are able to maintain changes to their diet and exercise habits, it can lead to a lower risk for heart attack and stroke."


'/>"/>
Contact: Rachel Bloch
rachel.bloch@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study
2. Normalizing tumor blood vessels improves delivery of only the smallest nanomedicines
3. Common Blood Pressure Drug Safe for Heart Failure: Study
4. Certain Birth Control Pills May Carry Higher Blood Clot Risk: FDA
5. High Blood Pressure May Be Especially Lethal for Blacks
6. Changes in gene expression may help explain high blood pressure in pregnancy
7. Researchers Develop Blood Test for Depression
8. Naturopathic care can improve blood sugar, mood in diabetes
9. Diabetes Groups Issue New Guidelines on Blood Sugar
10. Exercise May Help Patients With High Blood Pressure Live Longer
11. Additional blood pressure screening may reduce incidence of CVD events and death by up to 3 percent
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Datta Endoscopic ... has joined the revolutionary endoscopic practice under Dr. Datta. Patel is a Board ... Medicine. The patented, revolutionary eDiscSculpt Technique created and used by Datta Endoscopic is ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... 2017 , ... People are starting to accept that hearing aids can be ... the stigma it had when great-grandpa wore his hearing aids years ago,” said Dr. ... North American Speaker Series (NASS) segment. “He probably wore an iPod-size hearing ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... assisting the Brooke Grove Foundation implement a Microsoft Dynamics GP solution that integrates ... leading ERP expert that specializes in long-term care, Brooke Grove now has the ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Christie Medical Holdings, Inc. , with ... B. Braun Medical Inc. , a leader in infusion therapy and pain management. ... many as 90 percent of hospital patients receiving a peripheral IV catheter as part ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... ... April 27, 2017 , ... The ... the 2017 Public Leadership in Neurology Award (PLINA). The couple joins a prestigious ... Bruschi, Vice President Walter Mondale, actor Michael J. Fox and former U.S. Attorney ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/25/2017)... 2017 Endo International plc (NASDAQ: ENDP ) ... of its senior management team will host a conference call and ... The dial-in number to access the call is ... the passcode is 6086379. Please dial in 10 minutes prior to ... replay of the call will be available from May 9, 2017 ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... , April 20, 2017  Cogentix Medical, Inc. ... on providing the Urology, Uro/Gyn and Gynecology markets ... Ash Keswani has joined the Company as Senior ... newly created position, Mr. Keswani will report directly ... "Our organization is delighted that Ash ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... 2017  RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (NASDAQ: RXII), a ... significant unmet medical needs, today announced that it ... product development program, based on its proprietary self-delivering ... Dermatology (SID) 76 th Annual Meeting.  The ... sciences relevant to skin health and disease through ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: