Navigation Links
Blood Cancer Patients May Benefit From New Transplant Technique
Date:12/13/2012

By Maureen Salamon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers who have multiplied umbilical cord-blood cells in the laboratory say their technique might improve recovery for patients needing blood stem cell transplants to treat a blood cancer.

Their approach, still in the experimental stage, involves expanding normal blood cells from donated cord blood in conditions similar to those in bone marrow. This greatly enlarges the supply needed for transplant. And because umbilical cord blood is more easily matched in patients than donor bone marrow, the recovery period is safer and shorter, the researchers said.

"Since our very first patients, we had a very strong signal [of success]," said Dr. Marcos de Lima, who led the study while at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

"Recipients of cord-blood transplants are less likely to have some of the complications with the same degree of matching with bone marrow transplants. So if we can be less picky with the matching, immediately our inventory is bigger," said de Lima, now a professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland.

For the study, scientists at M.D. Anderson multiplied blood cells from one of two cords transplanted into 31 patients suffering from blood-borne cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. Compared to 80 patients receiving a standard double-cord blood transplant, these patients established a normal blood supply faster and were more likely to survive 100 days post-transplant.

The study is published Dec. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Each year more than 100,000 cases of blood, bone marrow and lymph node cancers are diagnosed in the United States, and more than 50,000 people die from these cancers, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For many of these patients, the only chance of a cure lies in stem cells retrieved from bone marrow, peripheral blood or umbilical cord transplants, which can re-establish a normal blood supply after diseased cells are destroyed by chemotherapy and/or radiation.

The blood stem cells can develop into any type of blood cell -- white, red or platelets.

But only about 25 percent of those needing a blood stem cell transplant have a matching donor, which can complicate or sabotage the patient's recovery. While cord blood is more easily matched genetically, de Lima said, even two cords provide far fewer cells needed by adult recipients than bone marrow or peripheral blood donations.

In the lab, de Lima and his colleagues took blood from one of the two donated umbilical cords and expanded it on a bed of so-called mesenchymal precursor cells, which in the bone marrow serve to grow a healthy blood supply.

The amount of time it took for the expanded cord blood cells to "engraft" -- or firmly establish -- in patients was significantly quicker than in the comparison group, leading to less risk of complications from low numbers of white blood cells and platelets, which fight infection and control bleeding, respectively.

One expert welcomed the findings.

"Cord blood and transplant doctors have been trying over the years to increase the number of stem cells in test tubes, and those methods have slowly been developing. This report is the first important study where this is not only feasible but practical," said Dr. Kanti Rai, a hematologist/oncologist with the North Shore-LIJ Health System in New Hyde Park, N.Y. "If this methodology can become reproducible in other people's hands ... then it opens a whole new opportunity for cancer patients."

Stressing that the results need to be duplicated in late-stage trials, de Lima refused to speculate how the new cord blood expansion method might affect cure rates.

"What we're offering folks is a less toxic [treatment] and hopefully a transplant that would be safer, with a shorter stay in the hospital," he said. "I hope it may one day improve the so-called cure rates simply because more people will survive this initial [period]."

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more information on blood cancers.

SOURCES: Marcos de Lima, M.D., professor, medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, formerly M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston; Kanti Rai, M.D., hematologist/oncologist, North Shore-LIJ Health System, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; Dec. 13, 2012, New England Journal of Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study
2. Normalizing tumor blood vessels improves delivery of only the smallest nanomedicines
3. Common Blood Pressure Drug Safe for Heart Failure: Study
4. Certain Birth Control Pills May Carry Higher Blood Clot Risk: FDA
5. High Blood Pressure May Be Especially Lethal for Blacks
6. Changes in gene expression may help explain high blood pressure in pregnancy
7. Researchers Develop Blood Test for Depression
8. Naturopathic care can improve blood sugar, mood in diabetes
9. Diabetes Groups Issue New Guidelines on Blood Sugar
10. Exercise May Help Patients With High Blood Pressure Live Longer
11. Additional blood pressure screening may reduce incidence of CVD events and death by up to 3 percent
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Blood Cancer Patients May Benefit From New Transplant Technique
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... A prescription medication bottle, ... the fourth Cradle to Cradle Product Design Challenge , the Cradle to ... series of six circular design challenges scheduled to run through early 2018. The challenges ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) , ... January 17, 2017 , ... ... joined the firm as a Principal in its IT Advisory Services practice . ... in recent months as market demand for strategic IT guidance grows, and the practice ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... The ... in Tyler, has announced the latest beneficiary of their thriving community involvement program. ... organization dedicated to fulfilling the dreams of terminally ill patients. Donations to this ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... ... the Montclair State University’s Athletic Training Education program forged a relationship built upon ... Education Program, which is consists of both student members and certified members ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... , ... Gym Source, America’s leading retailer of premium residential and commercial fitness ... , “We are elated to be opening this new showroom,” explains Tom Richard, Chief ... clients a seamless and motivating shopping experience.” , Every fitness journey is unique, and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/17/2017)... company that brought a full line of equine first aid kits ... of companion animal pet first aid kits.  EquiMedic USA ... developed two sizes of small pet first aid kits under the ... a small and a large companion pet first aid kit, this ... newcomer to working with small animals either. Corporate owners, mother and ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ® Technologies, Inc. announces that the Journal ... of Vibration on Molar Distalization," a study that focused ... Bowman , this prospective, peer-reviewed clinical study concluded that ... speeds up molar distalization rates in the apex ... to move the upper molars into a normal, Class ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... to their offering. ... The global fluoropolymer market in the healthcare industry to grow ... Global Fluoropolymer Market in the Healthcare Industry 2016-2020, has been ... experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: