Navigation Links
Blacks With Certain Gene Need Lower Doses of Warfarin: Study
Date:6/5/2013

WEDNESDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- The discovery of a genetic variation that affects how some black patients respond to the blood thinner warfarin could improve the safety and effectiveness of the drug, researchers report.

Blacks with this common genetic variation need a significantly lower dose of warfarin than those without the variation, the researchers report online June 4 in The Lancet.

"Adding this genetic marker -- found in more than 40 percent of African-American patients in the study -- to standard dosing algorithms improved the predictability of warfarin dosing by 21 percent in these individuals, which has the potential to increase the safety and effectiveness of this notoriously hard-to- dose drug," study leader Julie Johnson, of the University of Florida, said in a journal news release.

Warfarin is widely used to prevent blood clots in patients with a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, a history of previous blood clots and after major surgery. However, it can be difficult to determine the correct dose for individual patients.

Previous research has identified two genes that explain about 30 percent of the difference in warfarin response in people of European and Asian ancestry, but these genes have less of an effect in blacks.

In this study, the researchers analyzed health information and DNA samples from hundreds of blacks and determined that there was a strong association between the rs12777823 variant on chromosome 10 and warfarin dose. The findings suggest that the dose of warfarin required by blacks with one or two copies of this variant is about 7 milligrams (mg) to 9 mg less per week than for other patients, the researchers said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration advocates use of genetic backgrounds to help guide warfarin dosing, Mark Alberts, of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas and author of an accompanying editorial, said in the news release. "However, the practical aspects [and limitations] have not been fully appreciated.

"Genetic testing has several challenges: it is not widely available in some areas; it is costly; and clinicians often can identify the correct dose before test results are available. If these problems were corrected, the actual use of such tests might increase substantially," Alberts noted.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about warfarin.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, June 4, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. High Blood Pressure May Be Especially Lethal for Blacks
2. Hispanic lung cancer patients tend to live longer than blacks and whites
3. Blacks and Hispanics at higher risk for precancerous colorectal polyps
4. Blacks Less Likely to Get Help on Scene After Cardiac Arrest: Study
5. Eye Changes May Predict Heart Disease in Blacks With Diabetes
6. Blacks, Hispanics Have Higher Colon Polyp Risk Than Previously Thought
7. 9 in 10 Blacks With High Blood Pressure Have Early Heart Disease
8. Marriage has different meanings for blacks and whites
9. Blacks More Prone to Hypertension After Certain Strokes
10. Stress Adds to Salt Load of Some Blacks, Study Says
11. Blacks Less Likely to Stick to High Blood Pressure Diet: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Blacks With Certain Gene Need Lower Doses of Warfarin: Study
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World ... with chronic pain and the benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center ... with Sickle Cell Disease. , Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law ... magazine’s 2016 Legal Elite. The attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are ... , Seven Greenberg Traurig Shareholders received special honors as members of this year’s Legal ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... Topical BioMedics, Inc, makers of Topricin and MyPainAway Pain Relief Products, join The ‘Business ... to $12 an hour by 2020 and then adjusting it yearly to increase at the ... minimum wage, assure the wage floor does not erode again, and make future increases more ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Haute Beauty ... Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and the network’s newest partner. ... and the most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic surgery should be invisible.” ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... National recruitment firm Slone Partners ... with extensive sequencing and genomics experience, as Vice President of North American Capital Sales ... be responsible for leading the sales team in the commercialization of the HTG EdgeSeq ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016 The Academy of Managed Care ... that would allow biopharmaceutical companies to more easily ... make formulary and coverage decisions, a move that addresses ... medicines. The recommendations address restrictions in the ... the drug label, a prohibition that hinders decision makers ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Mass. , June 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, ... pharmaceutical company developing innovative inhaled drugs, announced today that ... Russell Investments reconstituted its comprehensive set of ... "This is an important milestone for Pulmatrix," ... will increase shareholder awareness of our progress in developing ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Any dentist who has made an implant ... process. Many of them do not even offer this as ... high laboratory costs involved. And those who ARE able to ... a high cost that the majority of today,s patients would ... Parsa Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions Inc. and inventor ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: