Navigation Links
Black and Hispanic patients less likely to complete substance abuse treatment, Penn study shows
Date:1/7/2013

PHILADELPHIA Roughly half of all black and Hispanic patients who enter publicly funded alcohol treatment programs do not complete treatment, compared to 62 percent of white patients, according to a new study from a team of researchers including the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Comparable disparities were also identified for drug treatment program completion rates. The study, published in the latest issue of Health Affairs, shows that completion disparities among racial groups are likely related to differences in socioeconomic status and, in particular, greater unemployment and housing instability for black and Hispanic patients. The researchers suggest that funding for integrated services and increased Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could help to improve access to treatment programs for minorities.

"Our findings show troubling racial disparities in the completion of alcohol and drug abuse programs, and they point specifically to socioeconomic barriers that make it difficult for minority groups to access and sustain treatment," said Brendan Saloner, PhD, a health services researcher at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholar at Penn. "For example, in both alcohol and drug treatment groups, black and Hispanic patients were more likely than white patients to be homeless. But, disparities among the groups were found to be lower in residential treatment settings, indicating that access to residential treatment could be particularly valuable for these patients."

After analyzing data from more than one million discharges from treatment programs across the country, researchers found significant disparities between white patients and most minority groups in completion of treatment programs. According to researchers, the statistical differences roughly translate to 13,000 fewer completed episodes of drug treatment for black patients and 8,000 fewer for Hispanic patients, compared to white patients. Other minority groups, including Native Americans, also showed lower completion rates than white patients. Only Asian American patients fared better than white patients for both drug and alcohol treatment completion.

According to the data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)'s 2007 Treatment Episode Data Set reasons for incomplete treatment included leaving against professional advice, incarceration, or having treatment terminated by the facility because of noncompliance. Saloner says socioeconomic barriers could operate in several ways to hinder treatment completion.

"Patients living in poverty may be more likely to receive treatment in an environment with high social distress, weak social support, or few economic opportunities," he said, adding that these external factors could undermine individual engagement with treatment or create competing demands, leading to higher dropout rates from treatment. "Unfortunately, it's possible that funding for treatment programs may be limited in the future as states and the federal government look for ways to trim spending on public programs. However, in the long run, these reductions in spending on treatment programs may lead to increased spending for corrections and emergency department admissions."

The researchers suggest that steps to broaden Medicaid funding in the Affordable Care Act could dramatically improve access. To be particularly effective, the policies should focus on points in the treatment process where vulnerable groups particularly minorities are likely to drop out of treatment. Broadened access to supported housing and vocational training could be two cost-effective ways of improving overall substance-addiction treatment results and reducing treatment outcome disparities, in addition to addressing significant public policy problems.


'/>"/>

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Weight-Lifting May Boost Heart Health in Black Men: Study
2. Rate of New HIV Infections Drops for First Time Among Black Women: CDC
3. Abused Black Girls More Likely to Develop Asthma: Study
4. Hair Concerns May Discourage Exercise for Some Black Women
5. Less Mental Decline Seen in Older Blacks Who Went Hungry as Kids
6. High Blood Pressure Poses Bigger Stroke Risk for Blacks, Study Says
7. PSW Acupuncture Clinic & Aesthetics Partners With BlackPearl Solutions to Launch Marketing Campaign
8. High hormone levels put young black males at risk for cardiovascular disease
9. PracticeFusion, DrFirst and Emdeon ranked as Top Electronic Prescribing Vendors Among Satisfied Clients, Black Book 2013 Survey
10. Thomas Jefferson University honoring Axel Ullrich with Lennox K. Black International Prize
11. Black Women More Likely to Die From Breast Cancer: Report
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... After graduating from Cornell, author Joshua Alexander ... hospitals, on medication, living on Social Security disability and staying in a group home. ... Beat It!” (published by Balboa Press), Alexander shares how he was finally able to ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... Design Concepts , ... Centro del Quinto Sol Wheel Park’ in Pueblo, Colorado. This park was designed ... something special for this often overlooked neighborhood. Located at 609 E. 6th Street, ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... NutraPre today announced ... for pregnant women to prevent morning sickness and promote overall heath. Engineered with ... look and taste of water. , “Imagine a pregnancy without morning sickness,” NutraPre ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... ... to an article published May 12th on the Medical Daily, as a great ... article points out that, as long as patients are brushing as they should – twice ... course, these worn-out bristles won’t clean teeth and gum tissue as effectively, so the article ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... May 23, 2016 , ... The Clinical Data ... from the Japan PMDA, US FDA, industry and academia at the 2016 ... format data from clinical trials so that it can be shared and compared, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/23/2016)... , May 23, 2016 ... Market Size, Share, Development, Growth and Demand Forecast ... Single and Other), by Application (Drug Discovery and ... End Users (Pharmaceuticals, Life Science and Biotechnology, Academic ... P&S Market Research, the global mass spectrometry ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... 2016 Non-invasive diagnostic test realizes ... diseases; ,Technology to be presented at Yissum’s booth, at ... Development Company of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem ... with Aurum Ventures MKI, the technology investment arm of ... diagnostic approach for early detection of multiple diseases by ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... , May 23, 2016 ... reach USD 5.0 billion by 2022, according to a ... generation of medical waste coupled with the lack of ... is expected to drive the demand for reprocessed medical ... devices as compared to that of the original device ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: