Navigation Links
Biological diversity of ovarian cancer lessens value of screening
Date:12/13/2010

DURHAM, NC Cancer prevention experts have long been frustrated by the lack of a meaningful way to screen women for ovarian cancer. It is a relatively rare disease that often progresses with few symptoms until it is too late for potentially curative treatments, and elevated values of the most commonly used biomarker used in screening, CA125, are also related to other disorders.

Now, scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute say that incorporating the latest information about the biological diversity of ovarian cancer appears to lessen the potential value of screening even further.

"I feel that what this and other studies are telling us is that we will have to do a whole lot more than screening to protect women from this terrible disease," said Laura Havrilesky, MD, an associate professor of gynecologic oncology at Duke and the lead author of the study appearing in the journal CANCER. "We need to work harder to find better approaches to screening and also consider the potential value of preventive strategies."

Until recently, ovarian cancer has been regarded as a single disease. But studies at Duke and elsewhere have shown that it has at least two distinct subtypes, a slow-growing, indolent form, which takes months to years to move into an advanced stage, and a more aggressive variety driven by key gene mutations that gallops through stages I and II in about half that time.

Havrilesky led a research team that used information in the SEER database to create a decision model for screening for ovarian cancer. The SEER database, maintained by the National Institutes of Health, includes information on cancer incidence, prevalence and survival in over a quarter of the U.S. population and breaks out ovarian cancer by type.

They then validated the model using early data from a real-life study, the U.K. Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS), a large, randomized trial that is using CA125 values and ultrasound to screen a general population of post-menopausal women for ovarian cancer.

In conceptualizing ovarian cancer as a single disease, the model predicted that screening women over the age of 50 in the United States could potentially lower cancer deaths by about 15 percent. But incorporating the two subtype concept, the model predicted deaths would fall by only 11 percent.

Havrilesky says it just makes sense: Screening is more likely to pick up a greater number of slow-growing, as opposed to fast-growing tumors, because indolent cancers remain in a more treatable early stage almost twice as long as their more virulent counterparts. "But catching and successfully treating the slower-growing cancers isn't going to do as much to reduce deaths from ovarian cancer as much as catching the more lethal tumors would do."

In an accompanying editorial, Patricia Hartge, MA, ScD, a senior investigator in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute, notes the modest benefit of screening for a general population, but says that screening for women at higher risk of ovarian cancer those who carry mutations known to be related to the disease or who have a family history of it presents a more hopeful picture.

But Havrilesky is not so sure. She says screening in even the highest risk population has not yet been proven successful and says other options are under study that may hold merit.

'We know that women who take oral contraceptives have a reduced risk of ovarian cancer, and the Duke Evidence-Based Practice Center is currently doing a systematic review and model to determine if this might be a reasonable approach for some women."


'/>"/>

Contact: Michelle Gailiun
michelle.gailiun@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study carried out into biological risks of eating reptiles
2. Biological clock could be a key to better health, longer life
3. New method to grow arteries could lead to biological bypass for heart disease
4. U of T researchers crack splicing code, solve a mystery underlying biological complexity
5. Adolescent brains biologically wired to engage in risky behavior, study finds
6. Length of biological marker associated with risk of cancer
7. Ticking biological clock increases womens libido, new research shows
8. Researchers uncover biological rationale for why intensive lupus treatment works
9. Multifunctional nanoparticle enables new type of biological imaging
10. Biological changes in suicidal patients
11. University of Utah and Harvard researchers take major step toward first biological test for autism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/8/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... pleased to announce that “Natural Language Processing–Enabled and Conventional Data Capture Methods for ... JMIR Medical Informatics . , Results of the comparative usability study demonstrate ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... CURE Media Group, the nation’s ... groups, has aligned with Upstage Lung Cancer in efforts to combat lung cancer, announced ... J. Hennessy, Jr said, “CURE Media Group is honored to team up with Upstage ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , ... December 08, 2016 , ... Premier Fitness Camp ... FIT , the ultimate weight loss and wellness program, at their world headquarters of ... to provide immediate and long-term results to anyone seeking weight loss, personal development, a ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... Catalent Pharma Solutions, the leading ... consumer health products, today announced that it had joined the Pharmaceutical Supply Chain ... organization to unite pharmaceutical and healthcare companies that share a vision of better, ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , ... December 08, 2016 , ... California Senate Bill ... payments per workers’ compensation claim in 2013 and 2014, according to CompScope™ Medical ... Institute (WCRI) . , According to the study, medical payments per claim in California ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016   TriNetX ... Nationwide Children,s Hospital signed a membership ... accelerate the development of new cures. ... representing over 57 million patients globally, biopharmaceutical companies ... together to improve protocol design, site selection, patient ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... LAVAL, Quebec , Dec. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... and TSX: VRX) ("Valeant") today announced positive ... vehicle-controlled clinical study to assess the safety and ... in the treatment of plaque psoriasis. ... adult subjects with moderate to severe psoriasis, IDP-118 ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016  EIP Pharma, LLC ... obtained proof-of-mechanism for neflamapimod (previously code named VX-745), ... 2a clinical trials that demonstrated significant Alzheimer,s disease ... (12-week treatment) and Study 303 (6-week treatment) are ... in Alzheimer,s Disease (CTAD) scientific conference in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: