Navigation Links
Better Teachers Make for Stronger Young Readers

Twins' study shows quality instruction helps kids achieve their potential

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Why one child excels in reading while another falters is largely due to his or her innate ability, but a new study finds that good teachers do make a difference.

"Kids have differences, and we're not at all saying that genetics don't matter; in fact, they do. But it's not the whole story," said study author Jeanette Taylor, an associate professor in psychology at Florida State University in Tallahassee.

When kids are placed in the best environments for learning how to read, "it really gives them a chance to bring out their best and to reach their potential," she explained. By contrast, low-quality teaching thwarts kids' reading potential.

The study is published in the April 23 issue of Science.

Richard K. Olson, a professor of psychology and a fellow of the Institute for Behavioral Genetics at the University of Colorado at Boulder, co-authored a similar study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology in February. Using twins in the same and different classrooms to examine early literacy achievement, Olson and colleagues concluded that "classroom effects," including teacher quality, account for 8 percent of their differences in performance.

Olsen said the Florida study is different because it doesn't quantify how much of the variability in student performance is accounted for by variability in teachers or classrooms. Rather, it examines the degree to which "genetic influence on student performance seems to vary as a function of how well or how much gain is made in the overall classroom," he said. "It's an interesting perspective, an interesting take on the influence of the class environment."

Twins share half or all of their genes, depending on whether they are identical or fraternal. In theory, that means they should achieve similar results in the classroom if given the same curriculum.

"Genetics play a big role," accounting for 70 percent to 80 percent of variability in children's reading skills, Taylor said.

So what role does the quality of instruction play?

Taylor and her colleagues collected data from 280 identical and 526 fraternal twin pairs in Florida. The sample included roughly equal proportions of black, Hispanic and white kids.

To assess teacher quality, researchers created an index reflecting the amount of reading progress made by the classmates of the twins from beginning of first or second grade to the end of the school year. The index was based on "oral reading fluency" scores, which provide an estimate of how many words in a paragraph a child can accurately read in a minute.

Using that information, the team conducted statistical analyses to figure out whether teacher quality influenced twins' reading performance.

Overall, the study shows that teacher quality makes a difference in reading achievement because it has a moderating effect on genetic differences. At high levels of teacher quality, there was greater genetic variance, "meaning that a good bit of why the kids in those classrooms differ had to do with their genetic differences," Taylor explained.

"It doesn't mean that it erases differences between kids. It allows those differences to emerge and be realized," she added.

Last week, Florida Gov. Charlie Crist vetoed a teacher pay and tenure bill that would have based teacher evaluations used in determining teacher pay, in part, on student achievements, the Miami Herald reported. The governor called the bill "significantly flawed," it said.

But the idea remains alive and well. Lawmakers in a number of states are considering linking teacher pay to student performance.

The problem, Taylor reasoned, is that kids bring their own differences to the classroom, including behavioral problems, learning disabilities and difficulties with English. "I think requiring that teachers pay be tied to performance is a really dangerous and a problematic idea just given the state of science," she said.

Olson echoed those concerns. "It's laying the blame on teachers for kids struggling. It's not fair and, I'll tell you, teachers are getting pretty fed up with it," he said.

More information

The U.S. Department of Education has more on improving student reading performance.

SOURCES: Jeanette Taylor, Ph.D., associate professor, psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee; Richard K. Olson, Ph.D., professor, psychology, and fellow, Institute for Behavioral Genetics, University of Colorado, Boulder; April 15, 2010, The Miami Herald; April 23, 2010, Science

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Better patient safety linked to fewer medical malpractice claims in California
2. Better Treatment Found for Crohns Disease
3. Flu Vaccine With Both B Strains May Offer Better Protection
4. M. D. Anderson zeroes in on better way to predict prognosis in pediatric leukemia patients
5. Want better health information technology? Ask patients how they want it
6. Building a better flu vaccine: Add second strain of influenza B
7. Maintaining regular daily routines is associated with better sleep quality in older adults
8. Simple Forms Help Docs Do Better Breast Exams
9. My Health and Money Helps Consumers Stretch Their Healthcare Dollars and Make Better Choices
10. Discovery May Lead to Better Multiple Sclerosis Treatments
11. BHR Pharma Statement on Brain Injury Awareness Month - Better Awareness, Treatment, Research Needed Now
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/26/2016)... Carolina (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... of a new product that was developed to enhance the health of felines. The ... centuries. , The two main herbs in the PawPaws Cat Kidney Support ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs surgery services, can ... Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. , Dr. Dorsey ... cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. Dorsey was under ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong ... Cum Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. ... to Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... A recent article published June 14 on ... article goes on to state that individuals are now more comfortable seeking to undergo ... such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area medical group, Beverly Hills ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... and Scientific Sessions in Dallas that it will receive two significant new grants ... grants came as PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Capricor Therapeutics, Inc. ... biotechnology company focused on the discovery, development and ... enrollment in its ongoing randomized HOPE-Duchenne clinical trial ... of its 24-patient target. Capricor expects the trial ... of 2016, and to report top line data ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... BOGOTA, Colombia , June 23, 2016  Astellas today announced the establishment of Astellas Farma Colombia (AFC), a ... second affiliate in Latin America . ... ... ... ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016  Experian Health, the healthcare ... the patient payment and care experience, today ... products and services that will enhance the ... offerings. These award-winning solutions will enable healthcare ... compliant in an ever-changing environment and redefine ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: