Navigation Links
Better Methods Needed to Measure Hospital Quality: Experts
Date:12/23/2010

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital-wide patient death rates may not be a reliable way to assess a facility's quality of care, a new study indicates.

Researchers in Boston compared four measures of hospital patient death rates. They found that the measures yielded both higher- and lower-than-expected rates for the same Massachusetts hospitals for the same year.

The findings add to an ongoing debate about the value of using death rates as a measure of health-care quality, said lead author Dr. David M. Shahian, a Harvard Medical School professor of surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and colleagues.

"It's troubling that four different methods for calculating hospital mortality rates as a measure of quality should yield such different results. Measurement theory -- not to mention plain common sense -- suggests that there is a problem," Shahian said in an MGH news release.

The study was commissioned by the Massachusetts government, which wanted to find a way to measure hospital quality for the public report cards required under the state's 2006 health care reform law.

The researchers compared four measures of hospital-wide death rates that were created by different vendors. Each vendor received identical data about 2.5 million patient discharges from all 83 general acute care hospitals in Massachusetts over a three-year period.

"The results of the horse race are that it's really not clear who won," study co-author Dr. Lisa I. Iezzoni, Harvard Medical School professor of medicine at MGH, said in the news release. "The problem is that we were measuring the success of each of these measures against a gold standard we simply do not have: an objective measure of hospital quality."

The researchers told the state they could not recommend any of the four vendors' tools.

"But the results should not be interpreted as an indictment of any particular technique," study co-author Sharon-Lise T. Normand, Harvard Medical School professor of health care policy (biostatistics) and a professor of biostatistics at Harvard School of Public Health, said in the news release.

Instead, Normand said, the findings "call into question the concept of measurement of hospital-wide mortality, as four different methods yielded four different results. Thus, this may not be a good way to assess hospital quality."

The study results are published in the Dec. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

More information

The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality urges patients to do their homework before they choose a hospital.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Massachusetts General Hospital, news release, Dec. 22, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Autism-Related Hypersensitivity Better Understood
2. Developing guidelines for better reporting of health research
3. Hawaiian-shirt.net Offers 10 Tips To Beat The Winter Blues: Things You Can Do Right Now to Have a Better Day
4. Better care at any hour for palliative patients
5. Patients Do Better at Hospitals That Follow Stroke Guidelines
6. More Expensive Hospital Care May Not Mean Better
7. New MRI May Lead to Better Brain Pictures
8. Biological clock could be a key to better health, longer life
9. Why do physicians order costly CTs? Ultrasound yields better diagnosis, safer, less costly
10. BetterInvesting Magazine Releases May Stock to Study and Undervalued Stock Choices for Investors Informational and Educational Use
11. New approach to immune cell analysis seen as first step to better distinguish health and disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Better Methods Needed to Measure Hospital Quality: Experts
(Date:5/28/2017)... Haven, FL (PRWEB) , ... May 28, 2017 ... ... Partners of America (PPOA), is proud to announce that Sheldon K. Cho, MD, ... comprehensive interventional pain management, a specialty that concentrates on minimally invasive techniques to ...
(Date:5/27/2017)... ... May 27, 2017 , ... From May 21-23, hearing ... The three-day event was held at the Marriott Syracuse Downtown Hotel in Syracuse, New ... brand and network of independent hearing healthcare providers to help them stay ahead in ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... ... new educational seminar to focus on current legislative activity and the latest regulatory ... at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 10, and will continue through Monday, Sept. 11, ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... , ... May 26, 2017 , ... ... first ever copper, antimicrobial, mesh back 24/7 task chair specifically designed for clinical ... “We are thrilled to partner with Cupron® to provide customers with a ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Rob Lowe acts as host and helps educate and inform ... hiking in American. Viewers can reconnect with America as it explores some of the ... consumers have looked for an inventive new place for a family vacation, and have ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/15/2017)... -- Enterin Inc., a privately-held CNS pharmaceutical company based in ... treat Parkinson,s disease (PD), has enrolled the first patient in ... controlled, multicenter study involving patients with PD and taking place ... a 9-to-12-month period. The first stage is open label and ... sites include Denver , Boca ...
(Date:5/10/2017)... 10, 2017  The Corporate Whistleblower Center says, ... sleep therapy clinics to call us anytime at ... is involved in a substantial scheme to overbill ... from an employee of a medical equipment company ... to provide medical practice groups with extra generous incentives ...
(Date:5/9/2017)... , May 9, 2017  Oramed Pharmaceuticals ... ), a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the ... that the Canadian Intellectual Property Office has granted ... Oral Administration of Exenatide". The patent covers Oramed,s ... GLP-1 is an incretin hormone that ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: