Navigation Links
Berries May Cut Heart Attack Risk in Women, Study Says
Date:1/15/2013

By Denise Mann
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Eating three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries each week may help reduce a woman's risk of heart attack, a large new study suggests.

The study included nearly 94,000 young and middle-aged women who took part in the Nurses' Health Study II. The women completed questionnaires about their diet every four years for 18 years.

During the study period, 405 participants had heart attacks. Women who ate the most blueberries and strawberries were 32 percent less likely to have a heart attack, compared to women who ate berries once a month or less. This held true even among women who ate a diet rich in other fruits and vegetables.

This benefit was independent of other heart risk factors such as advancing age, high blood pressure, family history of heart attack, body mass index, exercise, smoking, and caffeine and alcohol intake. The findings appear online Jan. 14 in the journal Circulation.

The study can't say specifically what about the berries seemed to result in a lower risk of heart attack among these women, or that there was a direct cause-and-effect link between eating the berries and lowered heart attack risk. But blueberries and strawberries contain high levels of compounds that may help widen arteries, which counters plaque buildup, the researchers said. Heart attacks can occur when plaque blocks blood flow to the heart.

"Berries were the most commonly consumed sources of these substances in the U.S. diet, and they are one of the best sources of these powerful bioactive compounds," said study lead author Aedin Cassidy. "These substances, called anthocyanins -- a flavonoid -- are naturally present in red- and blue-colored fruits and vegetables, so they are also found in high amounts in cherries, grapes, eggplant, black currants, plums and other berries."

Men are likely to benefit from eating berries as well, although this study included only women, said Cassidy, who is head of the department of nutrition at Norwich Medical School at the University of East Anglia, in England.

Although more research is needed to confirm these benefits, "these data are important from a public health perspective because these fruits can be readily incorporated into the habitual diet," the study concluded.

Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, a preventive cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, noted that this was a "huge study that followed women for a long period of time. Women who ate three or more servings of strawberries and blueberries per week decreased their heart attack risk by one-third. This is pretty compelling."

Steinbaum's advice to both women and men is to include berries in their diet, and make them part of their daily fruit and vegetable fill.

One serving of blueberries or strawberries equals about one cup.

Dana Greene, a nutritionist in Boston, regularly tells her patients to consume more fruits and vegetables, including berries.

"They are so good for you," Greene said. Besides flavonoids, berries also are loaded with other nutrients, including vitamin C, potassium and folate.

"I tell all patients to make sure that half of their plate is filled with fruits and vegetables, especially richly colored ones like blueberries and strawberries," Greene said. "Berries can also help people lose weight and maintain that loss because they feel fuller faster. There is no downside."

The study was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the U.K. Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

More informationf

What does a heart attack look like in women? Find out at the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: Aedin Cassidy, Ph.D., head, department of nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, England; Suzanne Steinbaum, D.O., preventive cardiologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Dana Greene, M.S., R.D., nutritionist, Boston; Jan. 14, 2013, Circulation online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Eating Berries Might Help Preserve Your Memory
2. Berries, Tea May Cut Mens Odds for Parkinsons: Study
3. Depression after heart attack: Threat perception has to be addressed
4. Heart Muscle Cells Regenerate in Kids, Research Shows
5. Eat Your Way to a Healthy Heart, from the January 2013 Harvard Heart Letter
6. Teenagers with a low muscular strength have a higher risk of dying early form heart disease
7. Study shows that human hearts generate new cells after birth
8. Common Heart Drug Might Improve Lung Cancer Survival
9. High BPA Levels in Kids Linked to Risk for Heart, Kidney Damage: Study
10. Researchers identify new target for common heart condition
11. Implanted Heart Devices Have Real-World Benefits: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Berries May Cut Heart Attack Risk in Women, Study Says
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... September 19, 2017 , ... First Choice Emergency Room , ... Howard Ng, as the new Medical Director of its Pflugerville- FM 685 facility. ... Director of our Pflugerville- FM 685 location,” said Dr. Stephen Van Roekel, Reginal Medical ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The Davidson Institute for Talent Development will ... 27 at a reception in Washington D.C. The recipients received $50,000, $25,000 and ... “I am honored to be a Davidson Fellow Laureate,” said Rishab Gargeya, a ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... MarkeTouch Media has partnered with fred’s ... a modern design with a more streamlined user experience and is designed to ... app includes hundreds of digital coupons that can be clipped to a customer’s ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... ... , ... TransLuma is a set of dissolving transitions created for use within Final Cut ... luminance of a scene without the use of keyframes. Choose to bleed away ... , TransLuma allows editors to gradually dissolve away the light in a scene to reveal ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... ... , ... A September 7 article on BBC News describes new ... world’s most common and least expensive medications, may be able to stimulate stem cells ... California Dental Group and Calabasas Dental Care says that, while it’s likely to be ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/1/2017)... , Sept. 1, 2017 Michael ... Solutions, Inc , highlights opportunities for growth in his ... report that Marlin Equity is seeking a buyer for ... annual award-winning 22-year-old healthcare solutions Value Added Reseller and ... "As the healthcare market ...
(Date:9/1/2017)...  Bayer will present the latest research from across its ... (ESMO) 2017 Congress, September 8-12 in Madrid, Spain ... clinical data on Bayer,s marketed portfolio and late-stage compounds as ... "We value the opportunity to ... at ESMO," said Carsten Brunn , Head of Pharmaceuticals, ...
(Date:8/29/2017)... ivWatch, LLC, the leading provider of continuous monitoring devices for the ... an Innovative Technology contract from Vizient, Inc., the largest member-driven health ... ... detection of peripheral IV infiltration and extravasation events ... The Innovative Technology contract was awarded to ivWatch based on ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: