Navigation Links
Ben-Gurion U and Cincinnati Children's Hospital to develop new pediatric medical devices
Date:12/27/2012

CINCINNATI, Ohio and BEER-SHEVA, Israel, December 27, 2012 Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) have received early stage funding to develop three new devices that have applications for pediatric medical markets, as part of a collaboration announced this past spring.

The collaboration pairs BGU's technical and engineering capabilities with the medical expertise of CCHMC physicians. Each project will receive up to $100,000 in the first round, with all funding contingent upon achieving project-specific developmental milestones.

"The collaboration between clinicians and engineers is one of the necessities for success in the development of medical devices, addressing the very specific unmet medical needs of pediatric patients," explains Prof. Joseph Kost, dean of BGU's Faculty of Engineering Sciences.

"After vetting nearly 80 unmet clinical needs, the BGU-CCHMC team identified three significant innovations after thorough market analyses and review by both internal and external stakeholders," says Doron Krakow, executive vice president, American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. "This collaboration will yield technology that could improve the medical care of children and potentially reduce healthcare system costs." The projects are being developed and led by a BGU engineer and a CCHMC clinician or surgeon. The initial three projects are:

Smart Sensing Catheter -- The smart sensing catheter will provide immediate and continuous assessment of the metabolic and physiological profile of critically ill infants and small children. The smart, micro-optic sensor combines nano-plasmonics with fiber optics that fit in a 1 x 1 mm area and can monitor and analyze at least 20 substances simultaneously.

"Once developed to the product level, the sensor can be used in other applications for water quality and environment pollutants monitoring," says Prof. Ibrahim Abdulhalim, head of the ElectroOptics Engineering Unit at BGU.

The catheter is being co-developed by Richard Azizkhan, M.D., surgeon-in-chief at Cincinnati Children's and the Lester W. Martin, chair of pediatric surgery. "Secondarily, this technology will reduce the need for repeated tests, thus reducing costs for the health system and society," Azizkhan noted.

Image Guided Needle Insertion Device -- This will combine sophisticated new imaging techniques with precise robotics to improve the accuracy of many medical procedures.

"Currently, a clinician has limited control over the path of a needle once inserted into the tissue and limited ability to know the precise trajectory required to achieve the desired needle position, often using trial and error even when guided by imaging modalities," says BGU Prof. Hugo Guterman of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

"The device substantially improves the accuracy for a number of invasive procedures while decreasing both the level of necessary expertise and the cost associated with current practice," adds Daniel von Allmen, M.D., director, Division of General and Thoracic Surgery at Cincinnati Children's. While initially targeting the pediatric market, this technology represents tremendous potential for the adult market as well.

Surfactant Delivery Device -- This innovative device consists of a delivery system for prolonged surfactant administration to premature babies' lungs, using nanoparticles. Current procedures do not allow for the sustained release of proteins or other complex particles in the alveoli of infants or adults. This technology would do just that, with the potential to deliver numerous therapies to the lower airway through a non-inflammatory delivery system. It is being developed by BGU's Prof. Joseph Kost and Jeffrey Whitsett, M.D., co-director, Perinatal Institute and chief, Section of Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology at Cincinnati Children's.

This collaboration is managed by CCHMC's Center for Technology Commercialization and BGU's technology commercialization company, BGN Technologies, Ltd. Cincinnati-based seed-stage investor CincyTech and Israel-based Ridgeback Business Development, Ltd. helped evaluate the projects. The CCHMC-BGU collaborative will seek new ideas and solutions for pediatric-specific medical devices from experts at both institutions for its next round of funding starting in January 2013.


'/>"/>

Contact: Andrew Lavin
andrewlavin@alavin.com
516-944-4486
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Non-invasive treatment for children with obstructive sleep apnea suggested by Ben-Gurion University study
2. Lauren Sciences LLCs research team at Ben-Gurion University awarded Campbell Foundation grant to develop a V-Smart therapeutic for neuro-HIV
3. New Facebook app to detect pedophiles and criminals developed by Ben-Gurion U. researchers
4. Viewing terrorist attacks on TV increases pain intensity -- Ben-Gurion U. researchers
5. Ben-Gurion U. researchers successfully test solar desalination system for arid land agriculture
6. Ben-Gurion U. and Cincinnati Childrens Hospital to develop pediatric-specific medical technologies
7. University of Cincinnati leads first trial on steroid and CNI withdrawal post-transplant
8. Cincinnati and Boston Childrens Hospitals receive an NIH Autism Center of Excellence Grant
9. Midwest regenerative medicine symposium to be held in Cincinnati
10. University of Cincinnati researchers win $3.7M grant from US Department of Defense
11. Children with chronic conditions increasingly use available resources in childrens hospitals
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/19/2017)... , ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... a medical capacity this year. Drs. Alexander Paziotopoulos, Andrew Petersen and Trish Henrie-Barrus ... condensed version of the clinic’s leading recovery program. , “We know it’s ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Bio-Optronics Inc. is ... modern CTMS workflow designed to seamlessly integrate and streamline the way researchers prepare ... single page, maximizing usability and improving efficiency significantly for users – a first ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... panel system. , The Tranquility privacy panel system was designed to deliver ... Tranquility panels help reduce noise and provide the visual privacy required to maintain ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... Rountree Brady Insurance Agency, a Savannah ... eastern Georgia, is embarking on a charity effort to raise awareness and gather ... every year than anything else, yet risk factors associated with heart disease are ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Attorney Robert “RC” Pate , founder of The Law ... Triumph Over Kid Cancer foundation. Each year, 175,000 children are diagnosed with pediatric cancers. ... the effect of the critical funding gap for research into pediatric cancer research. From ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... January 18, 2017 , , Marks E-QURE ... distribution agreement, following similar agreements in Israel ... Wound care is $2 5 billion ... E-QURE Corp. (OTCQB: EQUR), a leader in medical devices for the treatment of ... Médica Equipos Médicos S.A.S. (TeckMedica) in Colombia for the ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 18, 2017   Synthetic Biologics, Inc. ... therapeutics designed to preserve the microbiome to protect ... plans to initiate a Phase 2b/3 adaptive pivotal ... lovastatin lactone designed to reduce methane production by ... gut to treat the underlying cause of irritable ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... PAUL, Minn. , Jan. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... developer of medical devices using neuroblocking technology to ... today announced the pricing of an underwritten public ... million, prior to deducting underwriting discounts and commissions ... The offering is comprised of Class A Units, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: