Navigation Links
Baby Bottles, Pacifiers, Sippy Cups Can Injure
Date:5/14/2012

By Carina Storrs
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- For babies just starting to move around, walking or running while toting a bottle, a pacifier or a sippy cup might be a dangerous pursuit.

From a nationwide survey, researchers estimated that more than 45,000 visits to the emergency room between 1991 and 2010 in children under 3 years old were because of injuries related to using these products.

Most injuries involved children aged between 1 and 2 years who had a bottle and fell and cut their mouth.

"A lot of parents baby-proof their house but don't ever think about the possibility of an injury related to these products," said Sarah Keim, a researcher at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and lead author of the study.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents transition their children from a bottle to a cup between 12 and 15 months of age to avoid problems such as tooth decay. The AAP also recommends weaning babies off pacifiers between 6 and 12 months.

"Following these recommendations might also help reduce injury, so all the more reason to follow them," Keim said.

However, parents will not necessarily increase their children's risk of injury if they don't wean them off bottles and pacifiers by these ages, said Dr. Mark Zonfrillo, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The current study was not designed to test this possibility.

"I think that the normal reasons why we recommend weaning, which is that bottle-feeding has been associated with excessive milk intake, iron deficiency and possible problems with tooth decay, should be the reasons we focus on weaning," Zonfrillo said.

But parents can take steps to prevent injuries with these products, such as staying in the same room with their babies once they are mobile, he added.

The study was published online May 14 and appears in the June issue of Pediatrics.

For the study, Keim and her colleagues collected data from the U.S. National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, a network of about 100 hospitals nationwide that record injuries in their emergency departments related to consumer products.

The system recorded 2,283 cases of bottle, pacifier and sippy-cup injuries in children younger than 3 years between 1991 and 2010.

From that number, the researchers estimated there were 45,398 cases of these injuries nationwide during this period of time, or 2,270 cases a year on average.

Two-thirds of the injuries were in children between 1 and 2 years. "This is right around the time that kids start to walk and run and aren't very good at it yet," Keim said.

About 66 percent of the injuries were related to a bottle, and 86 percent involved a fall.

Although the researchers were unable to determine the exact injury sequence of events, "we suggest that a reasonable scenario would be a child walking or running with a product in their mouth or near their face and tripping and falling," Keim said.

It is not clear why more injuries were associated with bottles than the other products, Keim said. "There could be something about the products themselves that are potentially more dangerous or that children are using them more."

Injuries related to pacifiers made up about 20 percent of cases. They occurred most often in children under 1 year old and led to bruising and dental damage. Sippy-cup injuries, which were most common in children older than 2 years, were more likely to affect the head, neck and face.

Serious injuries were rare. Seven deaths related to these products were recorded during this time, which the authors did not include in the study.

Out of the estimated injuries, there were 1,321 cases of swallowing or inhaling the product, 1,895 burns and 1,821 other injuries like fractures.

The authors also found that the rates of injuries with these products decreased 41 percent over the time frame studied.

"A lot of this decrease was related to decreases in bottle use so it could be because children are breast-feeding longer or are transitioning to sippy cups earlier," Keim said.

Keim said it was reassuring to see that choking injuries made up a small portion of overall injuries.

For his part, Zonfrillo said, "It was interesting to see all the types of injuries grouped together."

The type of injury that was very prevalent in this study was also very minor, he added.

Having children stay seated while drinking may help protect them, the authors said.

More information

To learn more about child product safety, visit Keeping Babies Safe.

SOURCES: Sarah Keim, Ph.D., principal investigator, Center for Biobehavioral Health, Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; Mark Zonfrillo, M.D., pediatric emergency medicine physician, injury epidemiologist, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Center for Injury Research and Prevention, and assistant professor, pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; May 14, 2012, Pediatrics


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. New data provides direction for ACL injured knee treatments
2. Heading Soccer Balls Could Injure Brain
3. NJIT receives patent today for new shunt to aid brain-injured patients
4. Routine Head Hits in Sports May Injure Brain, Experts Warn
5. Too Many Kids Injured in ATV Crashes, Study Finds
6. Evidence Lacking That Cognitive Rehab Therapy Helps Brain-Injured Vets
7. Number of U.S. Kids Injured on Halloween Is Scary
8. Use Caution in Ending Life Support for Brain-Injured, Experts Say
9. When injured muscles mistakenly grow bones
10. Eating a high-fat diet may rapidly injure brain cells that control body weight
11. How to help heal an injured joint
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Baby Bottles, Pacifiers, Sippy Cups Can Injure
(Date:8/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... August 21, 2017 , ... ... with events taking place all over the country. , Outdoor running increases exposure ... runners are at an increased risk of melanoma, and only half may be ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... August 21, 2017 , ... The ... how exactly are we supposed to get things done in a healthy way these ... And, they’re launching a crowdfunding campaign on August 28 to introduce Deskcise Pro™– the ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... ... ... The American Hospital Association (AHA) has elected Claire Zangerle, Chief Nurse Executive ... of Trustees for a three-year term beginning January 1, 2018. , The ... are committed to the improvement of health in their communities. Founded in 1898, the ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... August 21, 2017 , ... ... health services business of UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH), has made a multi-million dollar ... responders affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) over ...
(Date:8/20/2017)... ... August 20, 2017 , ... A total solar eclipse will occur across the ... as the moon moves between the sun and Earth. This rare event will be magnificent ... can help keep you safe on the road during the total eclipse of the sun. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/2/2017)... and BENTON, Ky. , Aug. 2, 2017   Marshall County ... its environmental services (ES) team to proactively reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). The ... disinfection robot that uses UVC light energy to kill deadly pathogens such as C. ... Tru-D SmartUVC ... Tru-D in action in ...
(Date:8/2/2017)... a next-generation full-service pharmacy, has announced the launch of its ... Washington D.C. metropolitan area. CaryRx aims to ... through the convenience of its patient-friendly mobile app. Prescriptions can ... to any location in D.C. ... Washington D.C. ," says Areo Nazari , ...
(Date:7/31/2017)...  Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO), has been named one ... by Crain,s Detroit Business . The annual ... three-year revenue growth. This year,s edition measures growth from 2013 ... the complete list, visit crainsdetroit.com/awards/fast_50/2017 .  ... said Phil Hagerman , CEO and chairman of Diplomat. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: