Navigation Links
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Date:2/26/2009

Findings may clarify why fall and winter infants more likely to develop asthma

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Infants exposed to high levels of pollen and mold in their first few months of life are more likely to develop wheezing -- a possible early symptom of asthma, say U.S. researchers.

They studied 514 children born in 1999 and 2000 in California's Salinas Valley, and found that children born in high mold season (fall and winter) were three times more likely to develop wheezing by age 2 than children born at other times of the year. The researchers also found that total pollen concentration exposure during the first three months of life increased the risk of early wheezing.

As many as 40 percent of children who wheeze early in life may go on to develop childhood asthma, especially if they have other allergic symptoms, according to the authors of the study, published online Feb. 24 in the journal Thorax.

The findings may help clarify why babies born in the fall and winter appear to have a higher risk of developing asthma than children born in the summer.

One previous study found that babies born in the fall are at greater risk of developing childhood asthma. The authors of that study suggested that early-life exposure to respiratory viruses during the peak cold and flu season may be to blame.

"In our study, we took a different tack to understand the link between month of birth and asthma by considering ambient concentrations of fungal spores and pollen, which follow distinct seasonal patterns," study author Kim Harley, associate director of health effects research at UC Berkeley's Center for Children's Environmental Health Research, said in a university news release.

"Until our paper, there were very little data about exposure to allergens in the air, which we know can trigger symptoms for those who already have asthma. This is the first study to look at the potential role of early life exposure to multiple outdoor fungal and pollen groups in the development of asthma," Harley said.

She and her colleagues were continuing to follow the children in the study.

"We are not in a position to say conclusively why some children develop asthma, or to even suggest precautionary measures to help babies born in the fall and winter," study senior author Dr. Ira Tager, professor of epidemiology, said in the news release. "We already know that family history is a major risk factor for developing asthma, but the role environmental factors play is still being fleshed out. What this study does is provide valuable clues about airborne allergens that are worth exploring further."

More information

The American Lung Association has more about childhood asthma.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: University of California, Berkeley, news releaes, Feb. 23, 2009


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Stressed-Out Moms Carry Babies on the Right
2. March of Dimes, Experts for Moms and Babies, Launches Podcast
3. Steroids Seem Safe for Babies at Risk of Early Birth
4. Babies raised in bilingual homes learn new words differently than infants learning one language
5. Motherhood(R) Maternity Joins March of Dimes to Give Babies a Healthy Start in Life
6. Photo: Introducing a New Line of Baby and Toddler Shirts that Can Help Protect Innocent Babies During Flu Season
7. YouTube Video to Benefit AIDS Babies
8. Treadmill training helps Down syndrome babies walk months earlier
9. March of Dimes Honors Babies on El Dia de Todos los Santos
10. Common drug for stopping preterm labor may be harmful for babies
11. Babies Driving Robots at University
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at  Wheezing Risk
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... September 20, 2017 , ... “Finn Mouseson”: follows the exciting story of ... life. This mouse sets out on a journey that will show that friends are ... creation of newly published author and illustrator, Melody Gersonde-Mickelson, who has earned a bachelor’s ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... ... Moorwick”: the adventures of a young Scottish girl yearning to see the world. “The ... of five who used her time waiting for children to finish their extracurricular activities to ... It was a way to give some meaning to the hours I waited for one ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... September 19, 2017 , ... ... jiu-jitsu community have raised more than $15,000 in just a couple of weeks ... submission grappling matches and world-class instructor seminars, organizers expect to double those initial ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... September 19, 2017 , ... Trusted debt-reduction firm CreditAssociates, ... debt accounts, translating to in excess of $835 million in resolved debt for its ... unsecured loans are some of the categories of debt settled by the company. With ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... Hill, CT (PRWEB) , ... September 19, 2017 ... ... support, today announced the winners of the Entrepreneur Innovation Awards (EIA), held this ... all of whom are Connecticut-based companies and entrepreneurs, presented their innovative project ideas ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/12/2017)... 2017  ValGenesis Inc., the global leader in ... to announce the appointment of Dr. Ajaz ... of Directors and Chairman of Advisory Board beginning ... companies to manage their entire validation lifecycle process ... this process. Furthermore, ValGenesis VLMS enables rigorous compliance, ...
(Date:9/7/2017)... RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. , Sept. 7, 2017  For nearly two ... and service in the Assisted Reproduction Insurance industry. Today, New Life Agency ... expensive fertility medications. ... http://pharmacarecard.com/ (PRNewsfoto/PharmaCareCard) ... ...
(Date:9/6/2017)... , Sept. 6, 2017  Robert G. Szewc, M.D., ... Professional Member in recognition of his contributions to the ... as a Nephrologist at the practice of Kidney and ... kidney care and hypertension solutions. He has worked in ... of career experience, as well as expertise in kidneys, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: