Navigation Links
BUSM researchers show an oncolytic virus switches off cancer cell survival signal
Date:12/1/2010

(Boston) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified a mechanism by which specific viruses acting as oncolytic agents can enter and kill cancer cells. This finding, which is currently featured in an online edition of the Journal of Virology, could help lead to the development of more targeted treatments against many types of cancer.

The study was conducted by Ewan F. Dunn, a postdoctoral fellow, under the direction of John H. Connor, an assistant professor of microbiology at BUSM.

The virus, known as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), is being developed in the Connor lab and in other international research laboratories to kill cancer cells. VSV is not a significant human pathogen.

VSV is sensitive to the innate immune response, which causes lymphocytes to release interferon and protect the body from developing an infection. Cancer cells lose the ability to respond in that way, said Dunn. "When cancer cells transform, they become non-responsive, leaving them vulnerable to viruses attacking the cell and its function."

Previous research has shown that a major signaling pathway in cancer cells, called the AKT signaling pathway, is frequently turned on. AKT signaling is a cell survival signal, helping to keep the cancer cells alive. The team demonstrated was that VSV can switch off that signaling pathway, which suggests that a single viral protein could play a major role in cancer cell death.

"This study showed the important role of VSV in killing cancer cells through turning off a major survival signal," added Connor. "The identification of this mechanism is fundamental to understanding how VSV and other oncolytic viruses function."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jenny Eriksen
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers use patients own blood to treat hamstring injury
2. Sporadic breast cancers start with ineffective DNA repair systems, Pitt researchers find
3. Researchers identify a molecular switch that controls neuronal migration in the developing brain
4. UCLA researchers discover drug resistance mechanisms in most common form of melanoma
5. Researchers shine light on how some melanoma tumors evade drug treatment
6. New function of gene in promoting cancer found by VCU researchers
7. Stanford researchers first to turn normal cells into 3-D cancers in tissue culture dishes
8. Researchers find new target for stopping tumors developing their own blood supply
9. Researchers identify PTSD measures for use in traumatic brain injury research
10. New insight into the cause of common dementia found by researchers at Mayo Clinic
11. Researchers fight Americas other drug problem
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... Nightingale College continues the semiannual ... Day is a time Nightingale College dedicates to serving and volunteering for organizations that ... donations and volunteers or those that need a little extra help. , The ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... ... has been named to the 2017 Inc. 500|5000, an exclusive ranking of America’s ... growth rate of 139 percent, marking the twelfth year that the company has ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... 23, 2017 , ... The non-profit Seafood Nutrition Partnership (SNP) ... of the Science Symposium in partnership with the Global Organization for EPA and ... provides a forum for global leaders in human nutrition to outline the latest ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... Pivot ... addition of Zack Tisch as the firm’s new Consulting Services Executive. Mr. Tisch ... firm’s national accounts, from assisting clients with initial vendor selection and pre-implementation planning ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... “To Walk Away”: a captivating ... bomber named Edward Koontz. “To Walk Away” is the creation of published author, Larry ... over two hundred manuscripts in chemistry and religion, as well as four novels. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/2/2017)... Fenita J. Caldwell is ... Lifetime Professional in the Field of Healthcare. Caldwell ... Pharmaceuticals, AG. Her skills and areas of expertise ... Fenita ... experience as a highly successful sales specialist in ...
(Date:8/2/2017)... 2017  Life Flight Network and PeaceHealth Oregon Network announced ... care and operational efficiency for patients at hospitals in ... Cottage Grove , and Florence, Oregon ... Life Flight Network work collaboratively to move patients who require ... a time sensitive emergency exists. ...
(Date:8/1/2017)... 2017   CerSci Therapeutics , a non-opioid drug ... , has received notice from the National Institute on ... (NIH) that it has been awarded a Direct-to-Phase II ... in 2017 with an additional $1,000,000 to follow in ... application of their lead non-opioid drug candidate CT-044 to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: