Navigation Links
BPA in Food Packaging Tied to Child Obesity: Study

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The common chemical bisphenol A (BPA), found in the lining of many aluminum cans and a variety of food packaging, may be adding to the obesity epidemic among children and teens, according to a new study.

Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the use of BPA in baby bottles and sippy cups because of fears that it may cause developmental problems. BPA, however, remains in many products children and teens use daily, the study authors noted.

"BPA has been associated with adult obesity and heart disease," said lead researcher Dr. Leonardo Trasande, an associate professor of pediatrics at New York University. These new findings "raise further questions about the need to limit BPA exposure in children," he said. "This is the first study to find an association of an environmental chemical with childhood obesity in a nationally representative sample."

The study also suggests that diet and exercise are not the only factors involved in the obesity epidemic, he said.

Trasande speculated that because BPA can act like estrogen -- a female hormone -- it may have an effect on the body's hormones and fat cells, making them bigger.

Alternatives to BPA exist, he said. "This study raises the need to reconsider the decision not to ban BPA in aluminum cans and other food packaging," he said.

The report was published in the Sept. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Trasande's team looked at urinary levels of BPA in almost 2,900 children and teens who took part in the 2003-2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

Comparing these urinary BPA levels with participants' weight, researchers found that about 10 percent of children with the lowest levels of BPA in their urine were obese, compared with more than 22 percent of those with the highest levels of BPA.

Additional analysis showed this connection was only significant for white children and teens. The findings were similar for boys and girls. The association was not connected to similar chemicals used in sunscreens, soaps and other products, the investigators found.

BPA is nearly everywhere, Trasande said. According to study background information, nearly 93 percent of Americans aged 6 and older have detectable BPA levels in their urine.

Another expert commented on the new findings, noting that they do not prove that the chemical causes obesity.

"Like all observational studies looking at associations, this one cannot prove cause and effect," said Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center.

"It is possible that BPA is actually a cause of obesity. It could also just be a marker of, for instance, a diet made up of more processed foods that are the actual cause," he said.

It's also worth noting that obesity rates were substantial even among those in the study group with the lowest level of BPA exposure, Katz said.

An industry spokesman said there's no tie between obesity and BPA and he discounted the new findings.

"Attempts to link our national obesity problem to minute exposures to chemicals found in common, everyday products are a distraction from the real efforts under way to address this important national health issue," said Steven Hentges, of the Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group of the American Chemistry Council.

"Due to inherent, fundamental limitations in this study, it is incapable of establishing any meaningful connection between BPA and obesity," Hentges said. "In particular, the study measures BPA exposure only after obesity has developed, which provides no information on what caused obesity to develop."

Hentges added, "It is also relevant to note that dozens of studies have monitored the body weight of laboratory animals exposed to BPA. These studies found no consistent effect on body weight, indicating that BPA exposure is not likely to cause obesity."

However, Yale expert Katz said BPA might pose other health risks.

"BPA is a potential disrupter of hormones, and as such, it could plausibly contribute to obesity," Katz said. "A potential link to obesity simply adds to the list of potential indictments of this chemical. Whether this study is showing cause and effect or not, we seem to have ample information to reach a verdict: BPA ought to go."

More information

To learn more about BPA, visit the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

SOURCES: Leonardo Trasande, M.D., M.P.P., associate professor of pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; David Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director, Yale University Prevention Research Center, New Haven, Conn.; Steven G. Hentges, Ph.D., Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group, American Chemistry Council; Sept. 19, 2012, Journal of the American Medical Association

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Plain packaging reduces the appeal of smoking
2. An Early Start for Your Child with Autism
3. IntegraGen launches ARISk test, a genetic screening tool for autism in high-risk children
4. In children born with severe heart defect, surgical management has little effect on neuro outcomes
5. Children Born to Obese Moms May Face Higher Autism Risk: Study
6. Supporting LGB children may influence their long-term health, BU study finds
7. Out-of-hand tree nut consumption associated with better diet quality in children and adults
8. New study identifies promising, achievable solutions to Nigerias childhood mortality crisis
9. Symptomatic behaviour in childhood strongly predicts psychiatric treatment as a young adult
10. BASPCAN - UK-wide increase in number of children
11. IU, Regenstrief automated system aims to improve child health
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
BPA in  Food Packaging Tied to Child Obesity: Study
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Finnleo, a leader in the traditional and far-infrared sauna industry, ... far-infrared saunas. , For traditional saunas, Finnleo is offering 20% off ... and Finnleo uses only European Grade A Nordic White Spruce from sustainably grown trees. ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Ministers, ... Union (EU), ANDI Pan African Centres of Excellence, and public R&D institutions, civil ... for the opening of the 5th African Network for Drugs and Diagnostics Innovation, ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... FL (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... center, is encouraging people across the country to celebrate their sobriety and show ... people to post “before and after” photos this Thanksgiving with the hashtag #FacesOfGratitude ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... The McHenry County law firm of Botto ... by Attorneys Francisco J. Botto and Alex C. Wimmer. Attorneys Botto and Wimmer represented ... IL App (2d) 130884WC. , According to court documents, Adcock testified that on May ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... , ... Beddit® has launched a new Android app for use ... a more intuitive SleepScore™ that rates sleep quality on a 100-point scale and makes ... by a proprietary algorithm. Beddit analyzes the data to provide an easy to understand ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... November 25, 2015 The hope ... repeated failure of IVF cycles. After failure of over ... and had lost all hopes that she would be able to conceive ever. ... child conceived after failure of over 15 IVF cycles. ... before they decided to take one last attempt with Gaudium IVF ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 2015  Thanks to a donor with a personal ... Center,s Sister Diane Grassilli Center for Women,s Health now ... San Francisco . Fred ... with a gift of $617,320 that allowed the Center ... Tomosynthesis and Whole Breast Ultrasound. Tomosynthesis, three-dimensional (3-D) mammography ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Colo. , Nov. 24, 2015  Array ... that its Chief Executive Officer, Ron Squarer ... Healthcare Conference in New York.  The public is ... webcast on the Array BioPharma website.Event:Piper Jaffray Annual ... , Wednesday, December 2, 2015Time:1:30 p.m. Eastern Time ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: