Navigation Links
Avastin May Help Boost Survival With Aggressive Cervical Cancer: Study
Date:2/8/2013

FRIDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The cancer drug Avastin may extend the lives of patients with aggressive cervical cancer, a new study finds.

The findings might change the way these patients are treated and improve outcomes for women "who have previously had very limited treatment options," study lead researcher Dr. Krishnansu Tewari, said in a news release from the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI).

The research was sponsored by the NCI and received support from Genentech Inc., which makes Avastin.

The study included 452 women with recurrent, advanced or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard chemotherapy. Patients who received Avastin with their chemotherapy lived an average of 17 months, compared with just over 13 months for those treated with chemotherapy alone, the investigators found.

The patients who received Avastin were given a dose of 15 milligrams per kilogram of body weight, which was administered in the vein with their chemotherapy treatment. The dose was given one day every three weeks until the patient's cancer progressed or levels of the drug in the body became too high.

Patients who received Avastin did have more side effects than those who didn't take the drug, the researchers noted, and the side effects were consistent with those known to be associated with Avastin -- events such as bleeding, clotting and gastrointestinal issues.

Avastin also comes with a hefty price tag, about $5,000 per month.

Still, the increase in survival seen with Avastin "is welcome news as progress has been very difficult against this cancer," Dr. Jeff Abrams, clinical director of NCI's Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, said in the news release.

Another expert not connected to the study agreed.

Dr. Elizabeth Poynor, a gynecologic oncologist and pelvic surgeon at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, noted that women with advanced cervical cancers that prove resistant to standard treatments "have traditionally been a very difficult group to treat effectively with regimens available." She said the new study "provides new opportunities to develop and further refine treatments for this group."

The data has been submitted for presentation in June at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Research that has not undergone peer review is typically considered preliminary until such review is completed.

More than 12,000 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the United States in 2013 and over 4,000 women will die of the disease.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about cervical cancer.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCES: Elizabeth Poynor, M.D., gynecologic oncologist and pelvic surgeon, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; U.S. National Cancer Institute, news release, Feb. 7, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. FDA Issues Another Warning on Fake Version of Cancer Drug Avastin
2. Avastin Shows No Benefit for Earlier Colon Cancer: Study
3. Avastin Wont Extend Breast Cancer Survival: Study
4. Interpreting the Avastin-Lucentis study for persons with macular degeneration
5. Avastin No Benefit to Older Lung Cancer Patients: Study
6. More Fake Avastin Found in U.S., FDA Says
7. A Good Mood May Boost Seniors Brain Power
8. Living Near Equator May Boost Your Risk for Allergy, Asthma
9. Personalized plans to address barriers to HIV drug adherence boost chances of successful therapy
10. Fried Foods May Boost Prostate Cancer Risk, Study Says
11. Plastic Surgery Practice Gets Boost from Lower Eyelid Surgery Webinar
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Avastin May Help Boost Survival With Aggressive Cervical Cancer: Study
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... Software Development, has been awarded a contract by the Center for Medicare and ... aims to accelerate the enterprise use of Agile methodologies in a consistent and ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “America On The Brink”: the Christian history of the United ... the creation of published author, William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his wife, Millie, ... spent thirty years in the Navy. Following his career as a naval aviator ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 ... characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... the demand of today’s consumer and regulatory authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults ... tested to meet the highest standard. , These products are also: Gluten ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... , ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) will present the 2017 ... Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s Annual Symposium is ... pioneer in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award is presented to an ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/4/2017)... , Oct. 4, 2017 ... single-use, self-contained, illuminating medical devices, today announced regulatory ... Health Surveillance Agency (or Agência Nacional de Vigilância ... first single-use, cordless surgical retractor with integrated LED ... optimal access, illumination and exposure of a tissue ...
(Date:10/2/2017)...  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ... quarter of 2017 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. Lilly ... with the investment community and media to further detail ... will begin at 9 a.m. Eastern time. Investors, media ... of the conference call through a link that will ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... , Oct. 2, 2017 Halo Labs announces the European ... system called the HORIZON at MIBio 2017 in Cambridge, ... and visible particulate matter in biopharmaceutical samples with unprecedented speed and ... the novel technique Backgrounded Membrane Imaging. ... The HORIZON subvisible particle analysis system ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: