Navigation Links
Automated calls help patients in under-developed countries manage blood pressure, U-M study finds
Date:10/31/2012

ANN ARBOR, Mich. Hypertension is one of the greatest epidemics threatening the health of people in low and middle-income countries.

For patients struggling with high blood pressure in countries with limited access to health care, the key to improving health may be as simple as a phone call.

New University of Michigan research evaluated the impact of automated calls from a U.S.-based server to the mobile phones of patients with hypertension (high blood pressure) in Honduras and Mexico. The program was designed to be a low-cost way of providing long distance checkups and self-management education.

Patients were provided with home blood pressure monitors and reported information about their blood pressure, medication use and symptoms during the weekly automated calls. During the calls, they received tailored health information from U-M via a cloud computing system.

Compared to patients receiving usual care, those who received the weekly 12-minute calls for six weeks were more likely to say that they understood how to take their medication, experienced fewer depressive symptoms and were more satisfied with care. Blood pressures decreased significantly, especially among patients with the greatest need for education about their hypertension management.

"What some people may not realize is that the biggest health threats in less-developed countries aren't just communicable diseases like HIV. Chronic disease and high blood pressure are the biggest killers," says lead author John D. Piette, Ph.D., professor of internal medicine at the U-M Medical School.

"Our work shows that mobile technology can be used to help people living in poor areas of the world that don't have the infrastructure for health services. It was gratifying to see how something based at U-M could give these patients in remote areas information they needed to manage their hypertension."

The results were published in Telemedicine and e-Health.

Despite high poverty levels in both Honduras and Mexico, up to 70 percent of the population has a cell phone making it an instrumental tool to improve access to health monitoring and information, Piette says. The telehealthcare model had the most successful outcomes among people who had limited literacy averaging just six years of formal education and who lived on an average income of $2,900 a year.

Hypertension is a leading cause of the global epidemic of cardiovascular diseases and is a top health issue in Latin America where more than 100 million adults are hypertensive and rates among men are the highest in the world. Two-thirds of people with high blood pressure live in low and middle income countries.

"Our work provides evidence that this model of telehealthcare can deliver meaningful services to patients in remote areas of the world lacking access to health services," says Piette, who is also senior research scientist with the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System. "We hope to further study how this model helps with other conditions such as diabetes or depression."


'/>"/>

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Automated insulin dosage titration system demonstrates positive clinical study results
2. Automated autism screening tool available on Autism Speaks website
3. Automated breast ultrasound dramatically reduces physician interpretation time
4. IU, Regenstrief automated system aims to improve child health
5. Cardiovascular disease community calls for tougher targets to curb global risk
6. World Hepatitis Day - EASL calls on the United Nations to join the effort to tackle viral hepatitis
7. Public health expert David Dausey calls BPA ban hollow victory
8. Expert panel calls for new research approach to prevent youth violence
9. Report Calls for Counseling Guidelines for Treating Transgender People
10. Study calls for drug trial patients to receive more information about effects of placebos
11. Researcher Calls for Safer Glass-Fronted Gas Fireplaces: Burn Threat Remains
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Automated calls help patients in under-developed countries manage blood pressure, U-M study finds
(Date:4/28/2017)... , ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... announce the integration of Microsoft(R) Word(TM) Online(TM), which enables sleep physicians to create ... it streamlines the reporting process and provides a familiar interface that does not ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... sleep affects much more than energy – it also has mental and physical benefits. According ... reaction time, which can increase the risk of having a car accident. , This ... NSF to help you sleep better and feel better:, , Turn ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Ushio America proudly ... offer an instant energy-saving solution for F32T8 fluorescent lamps on most instant-start and ... These 50,000 hour rated lamps utilize the existing electronic ballast, saving labor and ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... exposed to more adverse experiences than children in the general population. That’s because ... abuse, neglect or other family challenges. While no fault of their own, youth ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Early detection ... improve drug safety and minimize the cost of development. In this webinar, sponsored ... using cell lines and for cardiac toxicity using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... 20, 2017  RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (NASDAQ: RXII), ... address significant unmet medical needs, today announced that ... consumer product development program, based on its proprietary ... Investigative Dermatology (SID) 76 th Annual Meeting.  ... the sciences relevant to skin health and disease ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... 20, 2017   ZappRx, Inc ., a digital health ... process, today announced it closed $25 million in Series B ... firm based in Seattle that is ... . The Series B round included participation from SR ... and GV (formerly Google Ventures). As part of ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... -- Eyevensys, a private biotechnology company developing ... technology that enables the safe, local, sustained production of ... range of ophthalmic diseases, announces it has received approval ... (MHRA) to advance its technology into clinical development. ... The EyeCET platform ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: