Navigation Links
Assisted Fertilization Risks May Be Due to Infertility

Single babies conceived this way have poorer outcomes, but procedure not at fault, study says

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The increased risk of poor health outcomes among single infants conceived through assisted fertilization (AF) may be due to causes of infertility rather than the procedure itself, say Norwegian researchers.

In general, single babies conceived using AF have worse health outcomes than spontaneously conceived infants. But this difference is much smaller among women who've conceived both spontaneously and with AF, according the study authors.

They analyzed data on 2,546 women who conceived at least one child spontaneously and another after AF, and compared them to 1.3 million women who conceived spontaneously and 8,229 women who conceived through AF.

The researchers found that AF conceptions were associated with a 25-gram lower mean birth weight, a two-day shorter gestation, a 26 percent increased risk of being small for gestational age, and a 31 percent increased risk of perinatal death.

Among women who had one child spontaneously and another with AF, AF conceptions resulted in babies that were nine grams lighter and that had a 0.6-day shorter gestation. Both babies were almost equally small for gestational age, but the spontaneously conceived baby had an almost three times greater risk of perinatal death than the AF baby.

"Birth weight, gestational age and risks for small gestational age babies, and preterm delivery, did not differ among infants of women who had conceived both spontaneously and after assisted fertilization," Dr. Liv Bente and colleagues concluded in a news release. "The adverse outcomes of assisted fertilization that we noted compared with those in the general population could therefore be attributable to the factors leading to infertility, rather than to factors related to the reproductive technology."

The study was published online July 30 in The Lancet and was expected to be published in an upcoming print issue of the journal.

In an accompanying comment, Dr. Anja Pinborg, of Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues wrote: "Considering that 1 to 4 percent of all newborns in Europe are conceived after assisted reproductive technology (ART), safety concerns are important. Reducing the number of multiple births has made improvements, but we need to gain a better biological understanding of the reasons why infertility and ovarian stimulation may have adverse effects on infant health. Consequently, we have to continuously monitor the short and long-term risks of ART."

More information

The U.S. National Women's Health Information Center has more about infertility.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, July 30, 2008

Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Pet Doors Opening at Assisted Living Centers
2. ASSISTED LIVING: The Model for Person-Centered Long Term Care
3. Assisted Breathing Eases Lung Symptoms for Heart Patients
4. New Coalition Presses for Quality Standards for Assisted Living Facilities in PA
5. As I-1000 Signatures are Counted, Washington State Medical Association Opposition to Physician-Assisted Suicide Reiterated
6. AdCare Health Systems, Inc. Announces the Refinancing of Three Assisted Living Properties in Ohio
7. A Place for Mom, Nations Largest Assisted Living and Senior Housing Referral Service Announces New Vice President of Finance
8. Californians Against Assisted Suicide - Controversial Bill, AB 2747 Narrowly Passes Assembly
9. Assisted Living Industry Looks at Future of Alzheimers
10. American Humane Forms Human-Animal Bond Division, Including Animal-Assisted Therapy, Humane Ed and Pets & Womens Shelters
11. New National Survey: 84% of Americans Over 50 Expect a Family Member to Move into an Assisted Living Community Within the Next 10 Years
Post Your Comments:
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... World Patent Marketing ... Jar, a container patent that allows for easier packing and organizing of items into ... worth $90 billion," says Scott Cooper, CEO and Creative Director of World Patent Marketing ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... ... Tampa is the first health care provider in the region to offer the vBloc® ... a vagal blocking therapy, delivered via the Maestro® System, for the treatment of adult patients ... 40 to 45 kg, or a BMI of at least 35 to 39.9 kg with ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... ... Dr. Paul Vitenas, one of the top cosmetic surgeons in Texas ... the Best Single Physician Practice in the nation. Dr. Vitenas and his practice were ... the industry publication. , Dr. Vitenas said he was very honored to receive ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... , ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... the 7th Annual 2015 Golden Bridge Business Awards under the New Products and ... zero capex web based sample management software that helps labs organize ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... facilities, radiographic technicians must mark the film for accurate interpretation by the radiologist. ... of. Fortunately, an inventor from Sacramento, Calif., has found a way to alleviate ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... -- CytRx Corporation (NASDAQ: CYTR ), a biopharmaceutical ... that it has reached its enrollment target of 400 ... trial of aldoxorubicin in patients with previously treated soft ... in Q1 2016. The Phase 3 trial is a randomized, ... from the FDA at 79 sites in ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... 1, 2015   Craneware, Inc ., the ... today announced the company will showcase a new ... ® solution at the American Society for ... . The new features are focused on simplifying ... and managing enterprise-wide pharmacy charges to ensure compliance ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... Germany , December 1, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... leading global manufacturer of eye and gaze tracking solutions, ... SMI remote eye trackers as a component of its ... concussions, eye sight, and medical and performance issues in ... part of SMI,s mass-market-ready eye tracking platform, which is ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: