Navigation Links
Aspirin's ability to protect against colorectal cancer may depend on inflammatory pathways
Date:3/9/2011

The reduced risk of colorectal cancer associated with taking aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be confined to individuals already at risk because of elevations in a particular inflammatory factor in the blood. In a paper in the March issue of Gastroenterology, investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute report finding that higher baseline levels of a novel inflammatory marker indicated increased risk of developing colorectal tumors and also predicted who might benefit from taking aspirin or NSAIDs.

"These findings suggest that a blood biomarker may be helpful in deciding whether individuals should take aspirin or NSAIDs to reduce their cancer risk," says Andrew Chan, MD, MPH, of the MGH Gastrointestinal Unit, the paper's lead author. "They also indicate that chronic inflammatory pathways are quite complex and further studies are needed to understand which facets of the inflammatory response are most associated with the development of colorectal cancer."

In recent years, considerable research has supported the importance of inflammation in the development of chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease and several forms of cancer. Many studies have found reduced incidence of colorectal cancer among individuals who regularly take aspirin or other NSAIDs, and disorders such as colitis and inflammatory bowel disease are known to increase the risk. To investigate whether moderately elevated levels of chronic inflammation also raise the risk of colorectal cancer, the investigators analyzed data from the Nurses Health Study (NHS), which has followed more than 120,000 female registered nurses since 1976, gathering comprehensive health information from its participants every two years.

The current study analyzed data from NHS participants who had provided a blood sample in 1989 or 1990 and were cancer-free at that time. After identifying 280 participants who developed colorectal cancer during the subsequent 14 years and 555 age-matched controls who did not, the research team analyzed their baseline levels of three inflammatory factors C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 (sTNFR-2). Although no association was seen between levels of CRP or IL-6 and risk of developing colorectal cancer, participants with the highest levels of sTNFR-2 had a 60 percent greater risk than did those with the lowest levels of the factor. In addition, the reduced risk of developing colorectal tumors associated with regularly taking aspirin or NSAIDs was primarily seen among participants with high baseline sTNFR-2 levels.

"Our results suggest that, even though chronic inflammation may increase colorectal cancer risk, not all blood markers of inflammation are markers of that risk," says Chan. "The most common blood biomarkers of inflammation CRP and IL-6 do not appear to be relevant, while sTNFR-2 does. A better understanding of the significance of these markers will help us identify individuals most likely to benefit from chemoprevention using aspirin or NSAIDs."

Charles Fuchs, MD, MPH, of Dana-Farber, the study's senior author adds, "Understanding the specific inflammatory pathways that influence risk for colorectal cancer will be critical. While there is widespread agreement that inflammation is broadly related to cancer risk, some pathways may be protective while others are detrimental. More clearly defining the relevant pathways should help us better tailor therapies and interventions that will reduce cancer risk."


'/>"/>

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. High-volume portable music players may impair ability to clearly discriminate sounds
2. As we sleep, speedy brain waves boost our ability to learn
3. Brains Learning Ability Seems to Recharge During Light Slumber
4. New study shows ability of transgenic fungi to combat malaria and other bug-borne diseases
5. Busy Social Life May Stave Off Disability in Elderly
6. Study explores ability of professional dancers to return to their career after hip arthroscopy
7. Higher levels of social activity decrease the risk of developing disability in old age
8. Poor sleep quality is associated with greater disability in rheumatoid arthritis patients
9. Study finds preterm birth clinic attendance leads to major reduction in infant disability
10. Study finds preterm birth clinic attendence leads to major reduction in infant disability
11. New online tool predicts probability of death from stroke
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... New York, NY (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... most influential people in business to advocate for action towards gender equality at their ... 18,000 views from around the globe, and reached a social audience of over 3 ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field”: the story of a missionary ... Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field” is the creation of published author, ... ages and currently teaches a class of ladies at her church, which she has ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The company has developed a suite of ... authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults 50+, every formula has been developed by ... , These products are also: Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Vegan, Soy Free, Non-Dairy*, Preservative ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Dr. Parsa ... contributed a medical article to the newly revamped Cosmetic Town journal ... the hair transplant procedure known as Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). , ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... nation's first interactive health literacy software tool, and the Cancer Patient Education Network ... cancer patient education, today announce a new strategic alliance. , As CPEN’s ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/23/2017)... 2017 Janssen Biotech, Inc. (Janssen) announced today ... the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the ... the treatment of moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis ... are needed to further evaluate the safety of sirukumab ... "We are ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... HistoSonics, Inc., a venture-backed medical device company developing a non-invasive, robotically assisted, platform therapy that ... developments today:   ... ... Tom Tefft ... Veteran medical device executive Josh Stopek , PhD, who has led R&D and ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... , Sept. 18, 2017 EpiVax, ... of bioinformatics and immune engineering, today announced ... influenza A (H7N9) vaccine. ... to seasonal influenza and presents a challenge ... prior exposure to be effective. Using state-of-the-art ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: