Navigation Links
Are smartphones disrupting your sleep? Mayo Clinic study examines the question
Date:6/3/2013

BALTIMORE -- Smartphones and tablets can make for sleep-disrupting bedfellows. One cause is believed to be the bright light-emitting diodes that allow the use of mobile devices in dimly lit rooms; the light exposure can interfere with melatonin, a hormone that helps control the natural sleep-wake cycle. But there may be a way to check your mobile device in bed and still get a good night's sleep. A Mayo Clinic study suggests dimming the smartphone or tablet brightness settings and holding the device at least 14 inches from your face while using it will reduce its potential to interfere with melatonin and impede sleep.

The research was among Mayo Clinic studies being presented at SLEEP 2013, the Associated Professional Sleep Societies annual meeting in Baltimore.

"In the old days people would go to bed and read a book. Well, much more commonly people go to bed and they have their tablet on which they read a book or they read a newspaper or they're looking at material. The problem is it's a lit device, and how problematic is the light source from the mobile device?" says co-author Lois Krahn, M.D., a psychiatrist and sleep expert at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz.

"There's a lot of concern about using mobile devices and that prompted me to wonder, are they always a negative factor for sleep?" Dr. Krahn says. "We found that only at the highest setting was the light over a conservative threshold that might affect melatonin levels. If it's at the mid setting or at a low setting it's bright enough to use."

In the study, researchers experimented with two tablets and a smartphone in a dark room, using a meter on its most sensitive setting to measure the light the devices emitted at various settings when held various distances from a person's face. They discovered that when brightness settings were lowered and the devices were held just over a foot from a user's face, it reduced the risk that the light would be bright enough to suppress melatonin secretion and disrupt sleep.

Other Mayo research presented at the conference includes the finding that some sleep apnea patients may not need annual follow-up visits. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea being treated with positive airway pressure are less likely to need a yearly check-up.

The researchers suggest developing a screening tool to assess which of these patients need annual follow-up visits.

Limiting annual visits to the obstructive sleep apnea patients who truly need them will reduce resource use and improve quality of care and patient satisfaction, says co-author Kannan Ramar, MBBS., M.D., a pulmonary and critical care physician with the Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester, Minn.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sharon Theimer
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Smartphones Linked to Sexual Activity in Teens: Study
2. Smartphones: Artists Promotes Face-to-Face Conversation
3. Psychetruth Releases Android App for Smartphones
4. Mutations impair childhood growth and development by disrupting organization of chromosome pairs
5. Simpler lifestyle found to reduce exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals
6. Energy Drinks Disrupting U.S. Soldiers Sleep: CDC
7. Test for hormone-disrupting chemicals gets global seal of approval
8. Lower GI problems plague many with rheumatoid arthritis, Mayo Clinic study finds
9. First targeted nanomedicine to enter human clinical studies
10. Clinical insight improves treatment with new lung cancer drug
11. Clinical news alert from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/12/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... CDRH Enforcement Trends: , Back to the ... , As Winston Churchill said, “Those who don’t learn from history are ... what to expect when they come knocking this year. But that takes time. , ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Each year, the American Physical ... in Anaheim, CA at the Anaheim Convention Center. Almost 10,000 physical therapists across the ... products in action, learn more about their chosen field and network with their colleagues. ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... CULVER CITY, California (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... to announce their participation in Red Carpet Events LA GRAMMY’s Style Lounge Event. Coco ... and healthy way to stay hydrated before the big event. The invitation-only gifting suite, ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... The ThedaCare ... San Francisco General Hospital on April 5-7. The series is a multi-day, multi-workshop ... habits. The workshops cover a broad range of topics, including coaching skills, the ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... 12, 2016 , ... Every winter, someone is killed, injured or loses a ... Burn Center, part of the Allegheny Health Network, has partnered with Etna Volunteer ... Heaters Need Space” campaign. , “Space Heaters Need Space” aims to bring ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... 12, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - Demers Ambulances announces its first delivery in ... Okaloosa County Emergency Medical Services (EMS) consisting ... one LT2 van. Quality Emergency Vehicles in Lecanto, ... the sale.  This is the latest in Demers, ongoing expansion ... President at Demers. --> Benoit LaFortune , Executive ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... , Feb. 12, 2016   HeartWare International, ... conference call and webcast to discuss its financial results ... 2015, on Thursday, February 25, 2016 at 8:00 a.m. ... prior to the conference call and webcast.  On the ... financial results, highlights from the fourth quarter and business ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ALISO VIEJO , Kalifornien, 12. Februar 2016 ... es mit der Aufnahme von Patienten für eine ... Embolisation von Aneurysmen („WEB") speziell für die Behandlung ... Laurent Spelle , MD, Leiter der Neuroradiologie an ... , Frankreich, und Hauptprüfarzt der CLARYS-Studie hat den ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: