Navigation Links
Angioplasty with stents may be safe in long-term for low-risk heart patients
Date:6/22/2011

Heart bypass surgery is considered the gold standard for most patients with left main coronary artery disease, one of the most serious types of heart disease and one that affects thousands.

But a new UCLA study reports favorable long-term outcomes for lower-risk patients with this condition who underwent angioplasty with medication-coated stents, rather than bypass surgery.

A more minimally invasive procedure than surgery, angioplasty is performed by snaking a tiny wire up through an artery in the groin to the blocked area of the heart. The clogged artery is cleaned out, and a stent a tiny wire-mesh tube is placed in the artery to help keep it open, allowing blood to flow freely through the heart again.

Published in the June issue of the journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, the study found that for patients with left main coronary artery disease who had normal artery function, the more minimally invasive procedure may be a safe and effective option.

"This is one of the first studies assessing the long-term outcomes of this procedure in lower-risk patients," said Dr. Michael Lee, an assistant professor of cardiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

According to Lee, current national guidelines recommend angioplasty with stenting only for patients who are poor candidates for surgery. He said that this may change in the future, if more studies like this one demonstrate the procedure's effectiveness in a wider range of patients.

Researchers reviewed data, taken from an international registry, on 221 patients who had left main coronary artery disease with normal artery function. All patients had undergone

angioplasty with drug-eluted stents between 2002 and 2009 at one of four institutions. The average patient age was 68, and the majority were male.

Patients sought angioplasty with stenting instead of surgery for a number of reasons, including high surgical risk due to health issues like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or a severely calcified artery, older age, or a preference for the more minimally invasive procedure.

"The study provided a window into "real-world" experience and is reflective of what is seen in everyday clinical practice," Lee said.

In examining 30-day outcomes for patients in the study group, the team found no reports of cardiac death, stroke, re-clogging of the artery or blood clots forming related to the stent. Seven patients (3 percent) experienced a mild heart attack that can occur during the procedure. According to Lee, these are mild events with little long-term clinical impact.

Follow-up angiographs or heart images were available for 136 (62 percent) of the patients, which helped further track their heart health status.

At one year, the cumulative event-free survival rate for cardiac death was 97.7 percent, and the event-free rate for artery re-clogging was 92.9 percent.

Over the course of the study, 22 patients needed to be retreated due to the artery re-clogging, and this occurred mostly in the first year. Of those patients, 14 underwent a repeat angioplasty and eight had bypass surgery.

One of the most common side effects of angioplasty with stenting in the past has been the re-closing of the artery after treatment. Lee says that with drug-eluting stents, this is occurring less frequently.

"Our analysis found that the short-term outcomes were excellent," he said. "Patients who survived after the first year had very good long-term survival and a low incidence of retreatment."

At nearly four years, the event-free survival rate for cardiac death was 95.5 percent, and the event-free rate for re-clogging of the artery was 88.9 percent. Twenty of the 221 patients had died and nine deaths were cardiac-related.

"We found that this procedure had a low overall risk profile and may prove to be a viable alternative for this patient group," Lee said.

Lee added that the next step would be a clinical trial comparing angioplasty with drug-eluting stents to coronary bypass surgery in this lower-risk patient population.


'/>"/>

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Angioplasty may be feasible for liver transplantation candidates with heart disease
2. Cardiac Rehab Can Boost Survival After Angioplasty, Study Finds
3. Elevated protein levels in cardiac muscles could predict mortality following angioplasty
4. Many Heart Patients Place False Hope in Angioplasty
5. Drug trial results refine treatment during angioplasty operations
6. The Mount Sinai Hospital Earns Highest Ratings in New York State Report on Coronary Angioplasty
7. UCLA study compares bypass surgery to angioplasty
8. New Insights Into Whos At Risk With Angioplasty
9. NEJM Publishes Trial Results Demonstrating Bard FLAIR Endovascular Stent Graft Is Superior To Balloon Angioplasty For Failing Dialysis Grafts
10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help Heart Patients With Stents
11. Bypass Surgery, Stents Seem to Bring Same Level of Relief
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... York, New York (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... life? The answer may be at the tips of your toes. Foot massage, whether ... as well as pure comfort and relaxation. The American Board of Multiple Specialties ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... franchises from across the country gathered at the La Valencia Hotel in San ... PROSHRED Chicago was named the year’s most outstanding franchise, walking away with ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... Pivot Point Consulting, a leading national ... & Services for HIT Implementation Support & Staffing report with an outstanding score ... by healthcare executives, managers and clinicians representing over 4,500 hospitals and 2,500 clinics. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Colorize ... from on one drop zone to the next using Colorize's dynamic moving camera. Colorize ... project. This package includes a 3D slideshow environment with 1 to 5 focus points ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... Calls Blacklist has just been updated by mobile app ... the developer has fixed known bugs within the app. Calls Blacklist allows its users ... not consuming any of their device’s battery power or memory. It provides a powerful ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... Feb. 4, 2016  SciClone Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... has entered into a settlement agreement with the ... resolving the SEC,s investigation into possible violations of ... terms of the settlement agreement, SciClone has agreed ... disgorgement, pre-judgment interest and a penalty.  This payment ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... -- Global Immunology Market to 2022 - Large ... growth Summary Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases are ... affect 5–7% of western populations. Although they are ... key patient demographics, they are pathophysiologically linked, being ... inappropriate immune response. Generally, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, a ...
(Date:2/4/2016)...  Aethlon Medical, Inc. (Nasdaq: AEMD ), ... treat life-threatening diseases, today announced results for the ... 2015. --> --> ... our last quarterly call, we strategically advanced pre-clinical ... to establish the Aethlon Hemopurifier® as a leading ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: