Navigation Links
Analysis suggests cancer risk of backscatter airport scanners is low
Date:3/28/2011

Calculations by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and the University of California, Berkeley estimate that the cancer risk associated with one type of airport security scanners is low based on the amount of radiation these devices emit, as long as they are operated and function correctly.

"The doses are low extremely low," said Rebecca Smith-Bindman, MD, a professor of radiology at UCSF, who made the calculations with Pratik Mehta, an undergraduate at UC-Berkeley. "The amount of radiation in these scans is so low that you don't have to be concerned about it."

The amount of radiation absorbed in a single scan, they say, is about the same as what the average person absorbs every three to nine minutes on the ground just from being alive. (The human body naturally absorbs radiation all the time from such sources as the sun and the earth). In their analysis, Smith-Bindman and Mehta also determined that the average person would absorb 100 times more radiation flying on an airplane than standing in a scanner.

At the same time, Smith-Bindman cautions that the analysis is based on the assumption that the backscatter devices work perfectly and are used as designed.

How certain can Americans be that there are not as-yet-unknown safety risks? For instance, is there potential for software glitches, human errors or mechanical malfunctions that could cause the scanners to exceed their design specifications and expose people to higher levels of radiation?

Questions like these are valid, said Smith-Bindman. She concludes that it would be prudent for the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to allow further testing and monitoring of the devices in the field. Currently the TSA does not permit scientists to have access to the scanners to do independent testing.

"Given how many people are being exposed to these machines," she said, "I would just want to make sure no possible unanticipated error could happen."

The analysis appears in a special article published online on Monday, March 28, 2011 in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

Scanners to Double in Number this Year

Ever since a failed bombing attempt in December of 2009, when a passenger on a Detroit-bound flight successfully boarded a plane with explosives hidden in his underwear, "backscatter" radiation scanners have been deployed more and more in airports across the country.

About 500 of these scanners have appeared in 78 U.S. airports so far, and the federal government ultimately has plans to double the number of them by the end of this year, said Smith-Bindman. Backscatter scanners are different from millimeter wave scanners, also used in airport security, which image the body using a different type of energy than ionizing radiation.

Because backscatter scanners use low energy X-rays to penetrate clothing, image the human body and reveal hidden articles underneath, they have drawn public scrutiny about privacy concerns and potential health risks.

X-ray radiation can damage DNA, causing a cancer risk with exposure to X-rays from any source. Taking the available published specifications for the backscatter instruments, however, Smith-Bindman and Mehta determined that the amount of radiation absorbed from routine scanning is relatively low and the added risk of developing cancers is likewise low.

About 100 million passengers take 750 million flights in the United States each year, and Smith-Bindman and Mehta calculated that fully implementing backscatter scanners would not significantly increase the lifetime risk of cancer for travelers.

They also looked at the U.S. population that may be at greatest risk: children. Because children are expected to live longer than adults, their lifetime risk of cancer would be higher.

Smith-Bindman and Mehta focused on a subset of children, considering five-year-old girls who fly round trip once a week. Even within this frequent flying group, they estimated that backscatter scanners would not significantly increase their lifetime risk of cancer.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jason.bardi@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. New blood analysis chip could lead to disease diagnosis in minutes
2. Analysis Confirms Diabetes Drug May Harm the Heart
3. Analysis Confirms Avandia May Harm the Heart
4. mygenomatix: A secure cloud-like model for next-gen sequencing data analysis
5. Tissue Analysis May Help Predict Breast Cancer Outcome
6. Peer Support Beats Usual Care for Depression, Analysis Finds
7. Competing risks analysis highlights new targets in preventing ESRD and death of diabetics
8. Zinc May Help Ease Common Cold: Analysis
9. Expert analysis of HER2 tests reveals issues with reliability, Mayo Clinic researchers say
10. Gay Teens Punished More Harshly Than Straight Peers: Analysis
11. Obesity Can Shorten Life, Analysis Finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Analysis suggests cancer risk of backscatter airport scanners is low
(Date:10/13/2017)... WI (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... As ... in medicine known as “patient engagement.” The patient is doing more than filling out ... partners. , “There is an increasing emphasis in health care and research on ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... The International Association of ... of excellence for the field of eating disorders, announces the opening of early ... in Orlando, Florida at the Omni Resort at ChampionsGate. , The ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... Lori R. Somekh, founder of the Law Office ... of elder law and special needs planning attorneys. “Membership in ElderCounsel helps our office ... forum to network with elder law attorneys nationwide,” said Somekh. , ElderCounsel ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... The Visiting ... Day Market. Featuring a collection of specialty vendors and unique items from across the ... and quality-focused health and wellness services offered by the VNA. The boutique will ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, ... week that explains one of the most popular and least understood books in the ... cryptic and puzzling descriptions that have baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed it ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... --  Divoti USA will engrave and process all ... the latest FDA requirements, which stipulates new criteria regarding medical device ... of Medical ID jewelry such as Medical ID Bracelets, can rest ... terms of the new FDA requirements . ... Divoti offers this dark mark fiber laser engraving ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... , Oct. 11, 2017  Caris Life Sciences ... on fulfilling the promise of precision medicine, today announced ... joined Caris, Precision Oncology Alliance™ (POA) as its 17 ... centers, the St. Jude Crosson Cancer Institute will help ... the use of tumor profiling, making cancer treatment more ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ORANGE COUNTY, Calif. , Oct. 10, 2017  NDS received ... Mobile  — a medical-grade battery-powered display stand specifically designed for ... aims to transform technology into a clinical solution to support the ... costs. Innovative Design ... NDS ZeroWire Mobile Wireless Solution ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: