Navigation Links
American Chemical Society's weekly PressPac -- Feb. 27, 2008


A nano-sensor for better detection of Mad Cow Disease agent
Analytical Chemistry

In an advance in food safety, researchers in New York are reporting development of a nano-sized sensor that detects record low levels of the deadly prion proteins that cause Mad Cow Disease and other so-called prion diseases. The sensor, which detects binding of prion proteins by detecting frequency changes of a micromechanical oscillator, could lead to a reliable blood test for prion diseases in both animals and humans, the researchers say. Their study is scheduled for the April 1 issue of ACS Analytical Chemistry, a semi-monthly journal.

Prions are infectious proteins that can cause deadly nerve-damaging diseases such as Mad Cow Disease in cattle, scrapie in sheep, and a human form of Mad Cow Disease called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Conventional tests are designed to detect the proteins only upon autopsy and the tests are time-consuming and unreliable.

In the new study, Harold G. Craighead and colleagues describe a high-tech, nano-sized device called a nanomechanical resonator array. The device includes a silicon sensor, which resembles a tiny tuning fork, that changes vibrational resonant frequency when prions bind. Its vibration patterns are then measured by a special detector. In experimental trials, the sensor detected prions at concentrations as low as 2 nanograms per milliliter, the smallest levels measured to date, the researchers say. MTS

ARTICLE #1 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Prion Protein Detection Using Nanomechanical Resonator Arrays and Secondary Mass Labeling


Harold G. Craighead, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Ithaca, New York 14853
Phone: 607-255-8707
Fax: 607-255-7658


The incredible, hypoallergenic egg: New process to help egg-allergy sufferers
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

People who suffer from egg allergies may soon be able to have their quiche and eat it too. Chemists in Germany and Switzerland report development of a new process that greatly reduces allergens in eggs and may lead to safer, more specialized food products for individuals with egg allergies. Their study is scheduled for the March 12 issue of ACS Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication.

Although unusual in adults, egg allergies are among the leading food allergies in infants and children. These allergies can cause severe stomach aches, and rashes. In extremely rare cases, death may occur. As a result, physicians advise those with egg allergies to avoid eggs or egg-based products. Some researchers have tried to reduce allergens in eggs, especially the pasteurized egg product (consisting of shelled eggs) widely used in the food industry. Until now, however, those efforts have been largely unsuccessful.

In the new study, Angelika Paschke and colleagues describe their process, which exposes raw eggs to a combination of high heat and enzymes to break down their main allergens. The researchers then tested their reduced-allergen egg against blood serum collected from people with egg allergies. The modified egg product was 100 times less allergenic than raw egg, the scientists say. It does not significantly affect flavor and texture when used in various products, they add. MTS

ARTICLE #2 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE In Vitro Determination of the Allergenic Potential of Technologically Altered Hens Egg


Angelika Paschke, Ph.D.
University of Hamburg
Hamburg, Germany
Phone: 49-40-42838-4353
Fax: 49-40-42838-4342


Promising new material for capturing CO2 from smokestacks
Journal of the American Chemical Society

Scientists and engineers in Georgia and Pennsylvania are reporting development of a new, low-cost material for capturing carbon dioxide from the smokestacks of coal-fired electric power plants and other industrial sources before the notorious greenhouse gas enters the atmosphere. Their study is scheduled for the March 19 issue of the ACS Journal of the American Chemical Society, a weekly publication.

In the new study, Christopher W. Jones and colleagues point out that existing carbon capture technology is unsuitable for wide use. Absorbent liquids, for instance, are energy intensive and expensive. Current solid adsorbents show promise, but many suffer from low absorption capacities and lack stability after extended use. Stronger, longer-lasting materials are needed, scientists say.

The scientists describe development of a new solid adsorbent coined a hyperbranched aminosilica (HAS) that avoids those problems. When compared to traditional solid adsorbents under simulated emissions from industrial smokestacks, the new material captured up to seven times more carbon dioxide than conventional solid materials, including some of the best carbon dioxide adsorbents currently available, the researchers say. The material also shows greater stability under different temperature extremes, allowing it to be recycled numerous times. MTS

ARTICLE #3 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Designing Adsorbents for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas-Hyperbranched Aminosilicas Capable of Capturing CO2 Reversibly


Christopher W. Jones, Ph.D.
Georgia Institute of Technology
Atlanta, Georgia 30332
Phone: 404-385-1683
Fax: 404-894-2866


Steel forges foundation for cheaper solar power
Journal of Physical Chemistry C

Steel forged railroads, skyscrapers and the automobile industry. Now it may help solar energy become cheaper and more widely available. In a study scheduled for the March 20 issue of ACS' weekly Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Finnish scientists report an advance in replacing the single most expensive component of a cutting-edge family of solar cells with less costly material.

These so-called nanostructured dye solar cells (DSCs) are a relatively new family of photovoltaic devices. Their simple manufacturing methods are hoped to lead to lower production costs compared to conventional solar cells. Traditionally, DSCs are deposited on conductively coated glass sheets which accounts for more than 30 percent of the material costs. Preparing DSCs on flexible stainless steel sheets is one way to reduce the costs and also to enhance mass production, according to Kati Miettunen and colleagues at the Helsinki University of Technology. Uncertainties existed, however, over the performance and stability of stainless steel photovoltaics.

In the new study, researchers describe construction of DSCs with stainless steel components and tests of the devices performance. It was shown that relatively high efficiencies can be obtained with DSC deposited on stainless steel substrate, the study said. Subsequent work will investigate the durability of the stainless steel components and make further improvements in these promising solar devices. AD

ARTICLE #4 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Initial Performance of Dye Solar Cells on Stainless Steel Substrates


Kati Miettunen, Ph.D. student
Helsinki University of Technology
Helsinki, Finland


Money and creative freedom draw researchers to elite German research institution
Chemical & Engineering News

With Germanys Max Planck Society (MPS) establishing a biomedical research institute in the Sunshine State a development that could help turn Florida into a Silicon Valley for biotechnology an article scheduled for the March 3 issue of Chemical & Engineering News, ACS weekly newsmagazine, provides readers with a behind the scenes look at this elite institution. The move represents the first time that an MPS site has been established in the United States, the reports says.

C&ENs cover story by Associate Editor Sarah Everts notes that MPS operates a $2.5 billion annual budget to support cutting-edge, non-university research. Since its establishment in 1948, the groups scientists have won 17 Nobel Prizes, including Gerhardt Ertls 2007 prize in chemistry. The Society has also funded key research into the development of improved polymers and high-tech light microscopy. Like the U.S.s Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a wealthy nonprofit foundation that funds some of the nations top researchers, MPS has made a name for itself by giving exceptional researchers free reign to do creative and risky research.

Recently, MPS announced that it would establish a new biomedical branch in Florida. The new institute will focus on devising non-invasive imaging methods to visualize molecular properties of biological tissue, the article notes. Like the Sunshine State, MPS is keeping the future of research looking bright.

ARTICLE #5 EMBARGOED FOR 9 A.M., EASTERN TIME, March 3, 2008 Max Planck Moves Stateside

This story will be available on March 3 at []

Michael Bernstein
ACS News Service
Phone: 202-872-6042
Fax: 202-872-4370

Journalists Resources

Save the Date: News Media Special Event April 7 in New Orleans
The 2008 edition of the ACS Office of Communications popular news media tour/briefing/reception heads for a premier research facility where science connects with everyday life. Reporters will visit the U. S. Department of Agricultures Southern Regional Research Center (SRRC) in New Orleans. After recovery from Hurricane Katrinas devastation, SRRC is continuing a 66-year heritage of discovery. SRRCs landmarks range from development of wrinkle-resistant cotton fabrics to battling the dreaded Formosan subterranean termite in the Second Battle of New Orleans. The event begins mid-afternoon on April 7 during the ACS 235th national meeting. Stay tuned for details and registration information.

Media registration for ACS National Meeting in New Orleans, April 6-10
Mark your calendars for one of the years largest and most important scientific events the 235th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), which will be held April 6-10, 2008, in New Orleans, La. With more than 160,000 members in the United States and other countries, ACS is the worlds largest scientific society. About 12,000 scientists and others are expected for the event, which will include more than 9,000 reports on new discoveries in chemistry. Those reports span sciences horizons from astronomy to zoology and include a special focus on health, energy, food, environment, and alternative fuels. In addition to coverage of breaking science news, the meeting provides an opportunity for independent reporting on disaster recovery efforts in the region prior to the June 1 start of the 2008 hurricane season.

Media should visit here ( to register, and housing reservations are now open for those who plan to attend the meeting. The ACS Press Center will be located in Room 206 of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. It will include a media workroom with staff to assist in arranging interviews, press conferences, wireless Internet access, telephones, computers, photocopy and fax services, and refreshments.

For reporters planning to cover the meeting from their home bases, the ACS Office of Communications will provide an expanded suite of resources, including press releases, non-technical summaries of research presentations, and Internet access to news briefings.

Updates on Fast-Breaking Advances in Nanoscience
The American Chemical Society has launched a new nanoscience and nanotechnology community Website. Called ACS Nanotation (, the site aims to become the premiere destination for nanoscience and nanotechnology news, highlights and community. Features include research highlights from ACS journals, career resources, podcasts and other multimedia resources, and interaction with other scientists. Registration is free.

ACS Press Releases

General Chemistry Glossary

For Wired Readers

Bytesize Science, a podcast for young listeners

The American Chemical Society (ACS) Office of Communications has launched Bytesize Science, an educational, entertaining podcast for young listeners. Bytesize Science translates cutting-edge scientific discoveries from ACS' 36 peer-reviewed journals into stories for young listeners about science, health, medicine, energy, food, and other topics. New installments of Bytesize Science are posted every Monday and available without charge. Bytesize Science is now listed as a "new and notable" podcast on iTunes. It is also being recommended by "Podcasting in Education," an organization that encourages educators to embrace podcasts as a classroom tool. The archive includes items on environmental threats to killer whales, a scientific explanation for why some people love chocolate, some unlikely new uses for compact discs, and a hairy tale about "hairy roots." The podcaster for Bytesize Science is Adam Dylewski, an ACS science writer and recent graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison with degrees in genetics and science communication.

Science Elements: ACS Science News Podcast

The ACS Office of Communications is podcasting PressPac contents in order to make cutting-edge scientific discoveries from ACS journals available to a broad public audience at no charge. Science Elements includes selected content from ACSs prestigious suite of 36 peer-reviewed scientific journals and Chemical & Engineering News, ACSs weekly news magazine.

PressPac information is intended for your personal use in news gathering and reporting and should not be distributed to others. Anyone using advance PressPac information for stocks or securities dealing may be guilty of insider trading under the federal Securities Exchange Act of 1934.


Contact: Michael Woods
American Chemical Society

Related medicine news :

1. Many Older Americans Have Active Sex Lives
2. Despite grumbling, most Americans say they are happy at work
3. Record Number of Americans Lack Health Insurance
4. Longaberger Expands Horizon of Hope Campaign to Build Support for American Cancer Societys Breast Cancer Initiatives
5. AUDIO from Medialink and Pfizer: Number of Uninsured Americans Grows to 47 Million
6. New Survey Shows Americans are Still Concerned About Food Safety, Yet Still Not Smart About What They Like to Eat
7. Novo Nordisk Appoints New Leader of North American Business
8. Amid Improving Life Expectancy Rates, Risk of Premature Death is Still Significant for Americans, New Study Shows
9. Primary biliary cirrhosis more severe in African-American and Hispanic patients
10. AOA President Calls on Congress to Reauthorize SCHIP and Take Action to Ensure Health Care Coverage for All Americans
11. American Chemical Societys Weekly Presspac -- Sept. 5, 2007
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
American Chemical Society's weekly PressPac -- Feb. 27, 2008
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... ... “While riding the bus, I saw a passenger in a wheelchair drenched ... be a convenient and comfortable way to protect them from bad weather, so I ... travel during cold or inclement weather. In doing so, it ensures that the user ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Privately owned Contract Development ... expansion of its current state of the art research, development and manufacturing facility ... increase its manufacturing capacity as well as to support its clients’ growing research ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Students and parents have something to be thankful ... Create Real Impact awards. California Casualty is proud to support the contest ... distracted and reckless driving, the number one killer of young drivers. , Almost ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Mississauga, ON (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... Deborah Williams without a referral for dental implants at her Mississauga, ON ... qualified and experienced in the placement of dental implants. , Missing teeth can ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Catalent ... for drugs, biologics, consumer health and global clinical supply services, today announced that ... Clinical Trial Supply East Asia Conference, to be held at the InterContinental Seoul ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015 Endo International plc (NASDAQ: ENDP ... , President and CEO, will discuss corporate updates at the ... New York on Wednesday, December 2, 2015 ... on Investor Relations, and then the link to the event. ... start time to visit the site and download any streaming ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015 Asia -based ... BioLight and the New Investors will make a direct ... a private placement. The financing will help IOPtima to ... used in the treatment of glaucoma, as well as ... IOPtimate™ system with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015 - Will Also Offer ... (CME) --> - Will Also ... (CME) --> - Will ... Medical Education (CME) Elsevier , a ... will feature latest diagnostic imaging textbooks and decision support tools, as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: