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American Chemical Society's Weekly PressPac -- March 5, 2008


Sniffing out uses for the electronic nose
Chemical Reviews

Despite 25 years of research, development of an electronic nose even approaching the capabilities of the human sniffer remains a dream, chemists in Germany conclude in an overview on the topic. Their review of R&D on digital noses is in the current issue of ACS monthly journal Chemical Reviews.

In the article, Udo Weimar and colleagues describe major advances that have produced olfactory sensors with a range of uses in detecting certain odors. Electronic noses excel, for instance, at picking up so-called non-odorant volatiles chemicals that mammalian noses cannot pick up like carbon monoxide. Ideally, however, an electronic nose should mimic the discrimination of the mammalian olfactory system for smells reliably identifying odors like fruity, grassy and earthy given off by certain chemicals. Until electronic noses become more selective, their roles probably will be limited to serving as valuable tools for tasks such as monitoring air quality and detecting explosives.

The electronic nose has the potential to enter our daily life far away from well-equipped chemical laboratories and skilled specialists, the article states. Keeping its limitations in mind and adapted for a special purpose, this will be the future for the electronic nose for as long as the ability to smell odors rather than detect volatiles is still far away over the rainbow. AD

Electronic Nose: Current Status and Future Trends


Udo Weimar, Ph.D.
University of Tbingen
Tbingen, Germany
Phone: +49-7071-29-77634
Fax: +49-7071-29-5960


Thirsty hybrid and electric cars could triple demands on scarce water resources
Environmental Science & Technology

Eco-minded drivers in drought-prone states take note: A new study concludes that producing electricity for hybrid and fully electric vehicles could sharply increase water consumption in the United States. It is scheduled for the June 1 issue of ACS Environmental Science & Technology, a semi-monthly journal.

In the study, Carey W. King and Michael E. Webber note that policy makers often neglect the impact that fleets of hybrid and electric vehicles could have on already-scarce water resources. They calculated water usage, consumption, and withdrawal during petroleum refining and electricity generation in the United States. Each mile driven with electricity consumes about three times more water (0.32 versus 0.07-0.14 gallons per mile) than with gasoline, the study found.

This is not to say that the negative impacts on water resources make such a shift undesirable, King and Webber emphasized. Rather this increase in water usage presents a significant potential impact on regional water resources and should be considered when planning for a plugged-in automotive economy. AD

The Water Intensity of the Plugged-In Automotive Economy


Michael E. Webber, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, Texas
Phone: (512) 475-6867


Researchers develop more computer-aided drug design
Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling

Researchers in Germany report an advance toward the much awaited era in which scientists will discover and design drugs for cancer, arthritis, AIDS and other diseases almost entirely on the computer, instead of relying on the trial-and-error methods of the past. Their study is scheduled for the March 24 issue of ACS Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, a bi-monthly publication.

In the report, Michael C. Hutter and colleagues note that computer-aided drug design already is an important research tool. The method involves using computers to analyze the chemical structures of potential drugs and pinpoint the most promising candidates. Existing computer programs check a wide range of chemical features to help distinguish between drug-like and nondrug materials. These programs usually cannot screen for all features at the same time, an approach that risks overlooking promising drug-like substances.

In the new study, researchers describe a more gradual and efficient system. Their new program uses an initial quick screen for drug-like features followed immediately by a second, more detailed screen to identify additional drug-like features. They applied this new classification scheme to a group of about 5,000 molecules that had previously been screened for drug-like activity. The new strategy was more efficient at identifying drug-like molecules whereby up to 92 percent of the nondrugs can be sorted out without losing considerably more drugs in the succeeding steps, the researchers say. MTS

Gradual in Silico Filtering for Druglike Substances


Michael C. Hutter
Saarland University
Saarbruecken, Germany
Phone: 49-681-302-64178
Fax: 49-681-302-64180


Residential oil boilers raise health concerns for Northeastern U.S.
Environmental Science & Technology

New research suggests that residential oil boilers, commonly used for home heating in the northeastern United States, should receive more attention as sources of air pollutants. The study the first to identify certain specific air pollutants in home heating oil emissions is scheduled for the April 1 issue of ACS Environmental Science & Technology, a semi-monthly journal.

Homes in the New England and Central Atlantic States consume about 80 percent of the 25 billion gallons of home heating oil burned in the United States. Scientists have been aware of potential public health effects of those emissions. However, there has been little specific information about the nature of the emissions.

Michael D. Hays and colleagues tackled that knowledge gap in their new study, which aimed to obtain improved or missing pollutant information for the popular home heating source. Among the substances of concern identified in the study were fine particulate matter known to cause asthma, bronchitis, and other health problems. The residential oil burner is a source of numerous hazardous air pollutants and ultrafine particles and, hence, may warrant more attention in the future than it has received so far, say the authors.

The research was conducted as part of a long-term national research program designed to better characterize particulate matter and its chemical precursors. The results are used to improve source emissions inventories and support efforts to determine how specific sources contribute to pollutant concentrations measured in the atmosphere. AD

Physical and chemical characterization of residential oil boiler emissions


Michael D. Hays, Ph.D.
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711
Phone: 919-541-3984
Fax: 919-685-3346


Funding cuts jeopardize cleanup of nuclear waste sites
Chemical & Engineering News

The Federal Government may need at least 20 years longer than previously planned and an additional $50 billion to clean up radioactive and hazardous wastes at nuclear weapons sites, according to an article [] scheduled for the March 10 issue of Chemical & Engineering News, ACS weekly newsmagazine.

The article, written by C&EN Senior Editor Jeff Johnson, cites a new U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) audit of its operations estimating that clean-up costs may reach $305 billion at about 25 sites where nuclear weapons materials were manufactured. Thats more than $50 billion above the Bush Administrations earlier estimate. The audit also indicates that it may take until 2062 to finish the cleanup job, over 20 years longer than originally scheduled.

Still, the clean-up budget proposed this year by the Bush Administration is $5.5 billion, one of the lowest since the massive remediation effort began in the 1980s. The budget cuts may be particularly hard felt at large cleanup sites such as Washington States Hanford Nuclear Site, the most contaminated nuclear site in the country, the article suggests. Some officials fear that the cuts could delay cleanup of Hanford and other sites indefinitely.

DOE Falling Behind in Cleanups

This story will be available on March 10 at

Michael Bernstein
ACS News Service
Phone: 202-872-6042
Fax: 202-872-4370

Journalists Resources

Reserve now: News Media Special Event April 7 in New Orleans

The 2008 edition of the ACS Office of Communications popular news media tour/briefing/reception heads for a premier research facility where science connects with everyday life. Reporters will visit the U. S. Department of Agricultures Southern Regional Research Center (SRRC) in New Orleans. After recovery from Hurricane Katrinas devastation, SRRC is continuing a 66-year heritage of discovery. SRRCs landmarks range from development of wrinkle-resistant cotton fabrics to battling the dreaded Formosan subterranean termite in the Second Battle of New Orleans. The event begins mid-afternoon on April 7 during the ACS 235th national meeting, followed by a reception with food and beverages. Space is limited so reserve your spot now by contacting Michael Woods ( or Michael Bernstein (

Media registration for ACS National Meeting in New Orleans, April 6-10

Mark your calendars for one of the years largest and most important scientific events the 235th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), which will be held April 6-10, 2008, in New Orleans, La. With more than 160,000 members in the United States and other countries, ACS is the worlds largest scientific society. About 12,000 scientists and others are expected for the event, which will include more than 9,000 reports on new discoveries in chemistry. Those reports span sciences horizons from astronomy to zoology and include a special focus on health, energy, food, environment, and alternative fuels. In addition to coverage of breaking science news, the meeting provides an opportunity for independent reporting on disaster recovery efforts in the region prior to the June 1 start of the 2008 hurricane season.

Media should click here ( to register, and housing reservations are now open for those who plan to attend the meeting. The ACS Press Center will be located in Room 206 of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. It will include a media workroom with staff to assist in arranging interviews, press conferences, wireless Internet access, telephones, computers, photocopy and fax services, and refreshments.

For reporters planning to cover the meeting from their home bases, the ACS Office of Communications will provide an expanded suite of resources, including press releases, non-technical summaries of research presentations, and Internet access to news briefings.

Updates on Fast-Breaking Advances in Nanoscience

The American Chemical Society has launched a new nanoscience and nanotechnology community Website. Called ACS Nanotation (, the site aims to become the premiere destination for nanoscience and nanotechnology news, highlights and community. Features include research highlights from ACS journals, career resources, podcasts and other multimedia resources, and interaction with other scientists. Registration is free.

ACS Press Releases

General Chemistry Glossary

For Wired Readers

Bytesize Science, a podcast for young listeners

The American Chemical Society (ACS) Office of Communications has launched Bytesize Science, an educational, entertaining podcast for young listeners. Bytesize Science translates cutting-edge scientific discoveries from ACS' 36 peer-reviewed journals into stories for young listeners about science, health, medicine, energy, food, and other topics. New installments of Bytesize Science are posted every Monday and available without charge. Bytesize Science is now listed as a "new and notable" podcast on iTunes. It is also being recommended by "Podcasting in Education," an organization that encourages educators to embrace podcasts as a classroom tool. The archive includes items on environmental threats to killer whales, a scientific explanation for why some people love chocolate, some unlikely new uses for compact discs, and a hairy tale about "hairy roots." The podcaster for Bytesize Science is Adam Dylewski, an ACS science writer and recent graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison with degrees in genetics and science communication.

Science Elements: ACS Science News Podcast

The ACS Office of Communications is podcasting PressPac contents in order to make cutting-edge scientific discoveries from ACS journals available to a broad public audience at no charge. Science Elements includes selected content from ACSs prestigious suite of 36 peer-reviewed scientific journals and Chemical & Engineering News, ACSs weekly news magazine. Those journals, published by the worlds largest scientific society, contain about 30,000 scientific reports from scientists around the world each year.


Contact: Michael Woods
American Chemical Society

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