Navigation Links
Alcohol, Cigarettes and Diabetes Up Colorectal Cancer Risk
Date:6/5/2009

More than seven drinks a week raises odds 60% over teetotalers, researchers say

FRIDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- It's been known for some time that obesity and eating lots of red meat can raise the risk of colorectal cancer, but new research sheds light on other lifestyle factors that increase risk.

Drinking alcohol, smoking cigarettes and having diabetes also play a major role in determining who is going to develop colorectal cancer, study findings show.

And although exercise seemed to help ward off colorectal cancer, eating lots of fruits and vegetables didn't, according to researchers at The George Institute for International Health in Australia.

"Most people probably know that being overweight and having poor dietary habits are risk factors for the disease," said study author Rachel Huxley, an associate professor at The George Institute. "But most are probably unaware that other lifestyle risk factors such as alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and diabetes are also important culprits," she said in a news release from the institute.

Not counting skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer among U.S. adults, according to the American Cancer Society. An estimated 50,000 people will die of colorectal cancer this year in the United States.

Worldwide, about one million new cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed annually and more than half a million people die, according to background information in the news release.

In the new study, Huxley and colleagues reviewed more than 100 published reports linking colorectal cancer and modifiable risk factors such as alcohol, smoking, diabetes, physical activity and diet.

The researchers found that people who consumed more than seven drinks a week had a 60 percent greater risk of developing the cancer compared to non-drinkers.

Smoking, obesity and diabetes were also associated with a 20 percent greater risk of developing colorectal cancer, about the same risk as consuming high intakes of red and processed meat, they noted.

The study also found that physical activity lowered the risk of the disease but there was little evidence that high intakes of fruit and vegetables were protective against colorectal cancer.

"These findings strongly suggest that a large proportion of colorectal cancer cases could potentially be avoided by making relatively modest lifestyle adjustments such as drinking less, quitting smoking, eating healthily and being a little more active," Huxley said. "Such changes would also have huge benefits in terms of reducing an individuals' risk of developing other major forms of illness including cardiovascular disease."

More information

The American Cancer Society has more on colorectal cancer.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: The George Institute for International Health, news release, June 2, 2009


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. College Freshmen See Rx Drug Misuse More Risky Than Alcohol, Pot
2. Alcohol, Drug Counseling Benefits Teens, Too
3. Young Adults Using Alcohol, Drugs for Better Sex
4. Culture can Affect Access to Alcohol, Drug Abuse Treatment for Rural Youth
5. New IOF Report Shows Smoking, Alcohol, Being Underweight and Poor Nutrition Harm Our Bones
6. Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence Supports the FDA Ban of Electronic Cigarettes
7. Menthol Cigarettes the Most Addictive
8. Deadly in Pink: Philip Morris New Look for Virginia Slims Cigarettes Shows Contempt for Womens Health
9. American Legacy Foundation(R) Statement of Support for the Federal Trade Commission Reversal on Tar and Nicotine Yield Statements on Cigarettes
10. Some moms quit cigarettes, marijuana, alcohol during pregnancy, but dads dont
11. Quitting Marijuana Just as Hard as Quitting Cigarettes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Alcohol, Cigarettes and Diabetes Up Colorectal Cancer Risk
(Date:6/25/2016)... Austin, TX (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... Fellow of the American College of Mohs Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for ... popular and highly effective treatment for skin cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method for ... is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are substances ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World Sickle Cell Observance Day. ... the benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center of Marne, Michigan, has ... , Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the red blood cells, which ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Comfort Keepers® of San ... Society and the Road To Recovery® program to drive cancer patients to and from ... adults to ensure the highest quality of life and ongoing independence. Getting to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Vegas, Nevada (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 ... ... Las Vegas client, The Grove Investment Group (TGIG), has initiated cultivation and processing ... Grove, in Las Vegas and Pahrump, Nevada. , Puradigm is the manufacturer of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition ... report to their offering. ... The World Market for Companion Diagnostics covers the world ... in the report includes the following: , ... by Region (N. America, EU, ROW), 2015-2020 , World ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , Belgium , June ... MKT: VNRX), today announced the appointment of Dr. ... of Directors as a Non-Executive Director, effective June ... Company,s Audit, Compensation and Nominations and Governance Committees.  ... Dr. Futcher will provide independent expertise and strategic ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the ... to 2022" report to their offering. ... patients with kidney failure, it replaces the function of kidneys ... blood and thus the treatment helps to keep the patient ... Increasing number of ESRD patients & substantial ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: