Navigation Links
Air pollution linked to cardiovascular risk indices in healthy young adults
Date:8/15/2007

Researchers in Taiwan have demonstrated for the first time that urban air pollution simultaneously affects key indicators of cardiovascular risk in young adults: inflammation, oxidative stress, coagulation and autonomic dysfunction.

The study, which appeared in the second issue for August of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society, investigated the effect of common urban air pollutants on biological markers for inflammation, oxidative stress, coagulation and autonomic dysfunction in 76 healthy Taiwanese college students.

The researchers collected blood samples and performed electrocardiograms on each subject approximately every 30 days for the months of April, May and June in either 2004 or 2005. They then correlated the sample dates and time with monitoring data from a fixed-site air monitoring station on the students campus. The concentrations of common urban air pollutants were averaged over 24, 48 and 72 hours.

They found significant increases in all indices of cardiovascular risk were associated with increased exposure to common pollutants. This study provides evidence that urban air pollution is associated with systemic inflammation/oxidative stress, impairment of the fibrinogenic system, activation of blood coagulation and alterations in the autonomic nervous system in young, healthy humans, wrote the studys lead author Chang-Chuan Chan, Sc.D., of National Taiwan Universitys College of Public Health.

Most pollution literature has shown affects in elderly people, and although there have been experiments in young subjects, epidemiological research has not found such significant effects in young people as with these students in Taiwan, said Benoit Nemery, M.D., Ph.D., professor in the division of pneumonology at the Catholic University of Leuvin in Belgium, who was not involved in the research.

Specifically, the investigators found that increases in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (an indicator of risk for a cardiovascular event), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) (a marker of oxidative stress), fibrinogen (a coagulation factor), plasminogen activator fibrinogen inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (a marker of inflammation) and decreases in heart rate variability (HRV) (a predictor of increased cardiovascular risk) were associated with increases in particulate matter, sulfate, nitrate, and ozone when they analyzed pollutants singly, and that increases in 8-OHdG, fibrinogen, and PAI-1 and decreases HRV were correlated to increased ozone and sulfate levels over three day averages in multi-pollutant models.

The precise biological mechanisms involved were not able to be determined with this studys design. Further studies with more detailed measurements of cardiovascular endpoints over time are still needed to elucidate the time sequence of pollution effects on cardiovascular endpoints in humans, wrote Dr. Chang-Chuan Chan.

Many questions remain to be answered, wrote Joel Kaufman, M.D., M.P. H., in the accompanying editorial, [But] these questions should by no means slow the important efforts to reduce exposures and benefit global public health.


'/>"/>

Contact: Suzy Martin
smartin@thoracic.org
212-315-8631
American Thoracic Society
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Air pollution affects the heart
2. Pollution could be a risk
3. Pollution- hazardous for diabetics
4. Air Pollution Found To Accelerate Heart Disease
5. Air pollution may raise risk of lung cancer
6. Air pollution hits heart patients during exercise
7. Air Pollution and Heart Attacks
8. Air pollution combined with greater medical needs
9. Traffic pollution linked to severe asthma attacks
10. Air Pollution Tied to Stroke Risk
11. Air Pollution said To Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... A ... revolutionize the emergency ambulance transport experience for the millions of people who require ... has disrupted the taxi industry through the use of technology. Now, SmartEMS has ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... PawPaws brand pet supplements ... that was developed to enhance the health of felines. The formula is all-natural and ... main herbs in the PawPaws Cat Kidney Support Supplement Soft Chews are ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Miami, FL (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton ... Plant City Observer , brings up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: ... The closing for fumigation is not a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... On Friday, June ... a Bronze Wellness at Work award to iHire in recognition of their exemplary accomplishments ... of the 7th annual Maryland Workplace Health & Wellness Symposium at the BWI Marriott ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was out of ... verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” remembers Marcy. ... throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill them. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Colombia , June 23, 2016  Astellas today announced the establishment of Astellas Farma Colombia (AFC), a new ... affiliate in Latin America . ... ... ... ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 The vast majority ... outpatient dialysis facility.  Treatments are usually 3 times a ... per visit, including travel time, equipment preparation and wait ... but especially grueling for patients who are elderly and ... skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers for some duration of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 The Biotechnology ... continues to present great opportunities to investors. Stock-Callers.com assesses ... Intrexon Corp. (NYSE: XON ), Vertex Pharmaceuticals ... (NASDAQ: ARNA ), and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. ... stocks and receive your complimentary trade alerts at: ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: