Navigation Links
Aging in place preserves seniors' independence, reduces care costs, MU researchers find

COLUMBIA, Mo. America's 75 million aging adults soon will face decisions about where and how to live as they age. Current options for long-term care, including nursing homes and assisted-living facilities, are costly and require seniors to move from place to place. University of Missouri researchers have found that a new strategy for long-term care called Aging in Place is less expensive and provides better health outcomes.

Adults want to remain healthy and independent during their senior years, but traditional long-term care often diminishes seniors' independence and quality of life," said Marilyn Rantz, professor in the Sinclair School of Nursing. "Aging in Place enables most older adults to remain in the same environment and receive supportive health services as needed. With this type of care, most people wouldn't need to relocate to nursing homes."

The conventional sequence of long-term care forces older adults to move from their homes to senior housing, to assisted living and eventually to nursing homes as their health and functional abilities decline, said Rantz. The Aging in Place (AIP) model provides services and care to meet residents' increasing needs to avoid relocation to higher levels of care. AIP includes continuous care management, a combination of personalized health services with nursing care coordination.

In a four-year analysis of AIP, the total care costs for residents were thousands less than traditional care options. Costs for living and health care never approached the costs for nursing homes and assisted-living services. In addition, AIP residents had improved mental and physical health outcomes.

"The goal is to restore people to their best possible health so they can remain independent," Rantz said."Once they are healthy, the additional care services are removed in order to minimize costs. AIP can be implemented by health care facilities and made available to seniors throughout the country."

AIP is used at TigerPlace, an independent living community that helps senior residents stay healthy and active to avoid hospitalization and relocation. Residents receive care services as they are needed and where they want them - in the privacy of their apartments. MU researchers use sensors, computers and communication systems to discreetly monitor residents' health. Motion sensor networks detect changes in behavior and physical activity, including walking and sleeping patterns. Identification of changes can prompt interventions that can delay or prevent serious health events.


Contact: Emily Martin
University of Missouri-Columbia

Related medicine news :

1. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
2. SNMs Conjoint Mid-Winter Meetings continue to advance molecular imaging
3. Medical Imaging Northwest Completes Phase I of Its Healthcare IT Integration to Maintain Patient Care Improvements
4. Less is more in cancer imaging
5. Imaging manufacturers: Plan to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure and medical errors
6. National Council on Aging Releases Survey on Medical Imaging Safety
7. Statement from Larry Minnix, President & CEO, American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging, on President Obamas Health Care Reform Proposal
8. Sytropin HGH Shows Promising Anti-Aging Results
9. Artists, Product Designers, Printing Gurus, Game Developers, Manufacturing Engineers Will Converge at RAPID 2010/3D IMAGING Conference/Expo, May 18-20 in LA
10. WellNet Supports HPM Institute Director in Calling for More Active Enterprise Involvement in Managing Healthcare Quality and Costs
11. Proton beam therapy shows encouraging long-term outcome for patients with locally advanced sinonasal cancers
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Aging in place preserves seniors' independence, reduces care costs, MU researchers find
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 30, 2015 , ... According to research by the National ... technicians to be certified or obtain continuing education. To increase awareness of the ... Mouth?” campaign to inform dentists that the technicians they trust could lack the ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... MN (PRWEB) , ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... at . The directory is specialized and only includes chiropractic clinics ... to find a competent and trustworthy alternative health practitioner when back pain sets ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The ... this summer, ushering in a new era of publicly accessible automated technology. Now, ... will continue to offer guests an up-close look at the shuttle at MOSI’s ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... Flint, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... November 30, 2015 ... ... a safe and fun atmosphere for Halloween festivities, the Word of Life Christian ... classic children’s board game, and featuring a giant 1.25 ton pile of candy ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) , ... November 30, 2015 ... ... the mesothelioma-affected community across the United States to access life-saving information ... on Malignant Mesothelioma will consist of three individual conferences in three major ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... Nov. 30, 2015 Baxalta Incorporated ... leader dedicated to delivering transformative therapies to ... conditions, today announced the launch and first ... an extended circulating half-life recombinant factor VIII ... full-length ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)]. The treatment ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... --> --> According to ... (Soft Tissue, All Tissue, Dental Welding Lasers), Application (Conservative Dentistry, ... Global Forecast to 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, is expected to ... 5.2% during the forecast period from 2015 to 2020. ... spread through 167 P ages and in-depth TOC on ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ORMP ), a clinical-stage ... delivery systems, announced today it has signed definitive licensing ... of Technologies Co., Ltd. ("HTIT") for exclusive rights to ... China , Hong Kong ... signed at the Israel Knesset (Parliament). ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: