Navigation Links
Aggressive response helped Chilean hospital improve H1N1 influenza outcomes
Date:2/24/2010

A Chilean hospital's early use of antiviral treatment in influenza patients and other aggressive measures helped reduce the number of severe H1N1 cases and related deaths. Those are the findings of a new study, now available online (http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/650750), published in the March 15, 2010 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

From May to July 2009, the number of patients visiting the emergency department at the Santiago hospital increased significantly, by 88.5 percent, compared with the same period in previous years. More than 10,000 patients were clinically diagnosed with H1N1, representing 78 percent of the excess emergency department visits.

There were no deaths associated with influenza during this period, and only 2 percent of H1N1 patients were hospitalized. Twelve pregnant women who required hospitalization ultimately recovered, contrary to reports of increased fatalities in this group in other countries. Virtually all of the H1N1 patients, 99.7 percent, were given antiviral treatment, most within 48 hours of having symptoms. In addition to early treatment, the authors credited aggressive management of the hospital's intensive care unit and experience with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), an extreme type of life support, in the improved patient outcomes.

"The main implications of our study are that early antiviral treatment for children and adults with influenza-like-illness would reduce mortality and the spread of the virus in the community," said study author Juan Pablo Torres, MD, PhD, of the Clnica Las Condes and Universidad de Chile in Santiago, who also highlighted the importance of vaccinating children. "As most of the pediatric deaths due to the novel H1N1 influenza virus reported in the United States occurred in school-aged children, vaccination would be very beneficial."

In an accompanying editorial, W. Paul Glezen, MD, of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, agreed with the recommendations. "The strategy of early treatment for all who present to urgent care facilities deserves consideration as a means of reducing serious complications of influenza," wrote Dr. Glezen, who also suggested the use of vaccination clinics in schools. "School-based vaccine clinics could facilitate rapid distribution of vaccine to a high proportion of children and not only reduce mortality but also dampen the spread of virus in the community to allow more time to vaccinate all other segments of the population."


'/>"/>

Contact: John Heys
jheys@idsociety.org
703-299-0412
Infectious Diseases Society of America
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Frequent Prostate Screens Fail to Improve Aggressive Cancer Diagnoses
2. Coalition for Pulmonary Fibrosis Launches Aggressive Ad Campaign Directed at United States Congress
3. AWT Management Announce Aggressive Growth and Acquisition Strategy
4. Novel strategy under study for aggressive leukemia
5. Prostate cancer more likely to return in blacks than whites, but the disease is not more aggressive
6. Mayo Clinic tests novel vaccine for aggressive brain tumors
7. Aggressively Treating Cardiac Risk Factors May Reverse Ischemia
8. Breast cancer is more aggressive in African-American women
9. Gene Variant Tied to More Aggressive Prostate Cancer
10. Study finds gene linked to aggressive prostate cancer
11. Even tiny breast tumors can be aggressive and may require maximum therapy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:9/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 20, 2017 , ... “Finn Mouseson”: ... take precedence in an average life. This mouse sets out on a journey that ... heart. “Finn Mouseson” is the creation of newly published author and illustrator, Melody Gersonde-Mickelson, ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... ... “The Financial Favor of God; Second Edition”: a personal and exquisite recipe ... creation of published author, Brooks Rathell. , “We typically hear about the favor of ... financial favor of God. Not only does it exist, but it is meant for ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... September 19, 2017 , ... DeSola Group, ... marketing leader, Denise Flannery, to its strategic advisory and client development team. ... will work with clients across different industries to develop and implement market-justified strategies, ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) – the ... the lymphoma community through a comprehensive series of education programs, outreach initiatives and ... Swirl: A Wine Tasting Event series on Thursday, October 26, 2017. Hosted at ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... MD (PRWEB) , ... September 19, 2017 , ... ... the Society of Professional Benefit Administrators (SPBA) hosted “Expanding Your Success” ... for SPBA Members as it focused on best practices for third party administrators ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/12/2017)... 12, 2017  ValGenesis Inc., the global leader ... pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. ... Board of Directors and Chairman of Advisory Board ... science companies to manage their entire validation lifecycle ... in this process. Furthermore, ValGenesis VLMS enables rigorous ...
(Date:9/9/2017)... Sept. 9, 2017  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: ... secondary endpoint data for lasmiditan, an investigational, oral, first-in-class ... statistically significant improvements compared to placebo in the Phase ... at the 18th Congress of the International Headache Society ... "The data presented today demonstrate lasmiditan,s potential to reduce ...
(Date:9/7/2017)... 7, 2017 Caris Life Sciences, a ... the promise of precision medicine, today announced results ... of its molecular profiling approach in guiding therapeutic ... profiling plus (CGP+) with Caris Molecular Intelligence ® ... a molecular level, leading to more therapeutic options ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: