Navigation Links
Aggressive preschoolers found to have fewer friends than others

Preschoolers who are aggressive, angry, and inattentive tend to have fewer playmates than their non-aggressive classmates, whether they are boys or girls. In comparison, non-aggressive children do better at interactions with many peers over time.

Those are the findings of new research that used an important innovation for studying children's peer relationships. Conducted by researchers at Arizona State University and published in the July/August 2008 issue of the journal Child Development, the study suggests that as early as preschool, aggressive children have less consistent relationships with their peers.

Preschool is a time when there are a lot of changes in the ways children interact with their peers. Although aggressive behavior is common at this age, as children practice social skills and learn how to control their behavior, some children show more intense aggression or do so more often. These children may harm other children, be quick to anger, and have trouble focusing on activities. Because these children are at risk for later social and developmental problems, researchers feel it is important to understand their early relationships with peers.

The Arizona State University researchers observed 97 students in six preschool classrooms in an urban southwest area of the United States; the students' teachers also reported on the children's behavior. Using a new quantitative procedure called the Q-connectivity method, they repeatedly assessed the children's peer interactions to determine how many peers the children interacted with and how often those interactions took place. Using that information, they looked at the relationship between children's ability to establish and maintain relationships with peers and their tendency to display physical aggression, anger, and attention problems.

Aggressive, angry, and inattentive children tended to play with fewer peers repeatedly over time than their non-aggressive classmates, who were more successful at interacting frequently with many classmates over time. This pattern also was true of younger children, which is not surprising given the typical social development of younger children, who tend to move from solitary play to increased involvement with classmates. The findings were the same for boys as well as girls.


Contact: Andrea Browning
Society for Research in Child Development

Related medicine news :

1. Cord Blood America CEO Matthew Schissler Details Aggressive Expansion Strategies in U.S. and Europe
2. Aggressive treatment of childhood eczema could help prevent asthma, says new study
3. Researchers ID Traits of Aggressive Prostate Cancer
4. Cancer Drug Appears to Help With Aggressive MS
5. Microenvironment a main driver of aggressive multi-lineage leukemia disease type
6. U-M researchers discover traits of aggressive form of prostate cancer
7. Studies Differ on Benefits of Aggressive Blood Sugar Control
8. Black patients with terminal cancer more likely to choose aggressive care at end of life
9. Study: Patients 75 years and older with brain tumors may benefit from more aggressive treatment
10. Researchers find gene location that gives rise to neuroblastoma, an aggressive childhood cancer
11. Researchers Find Gene Location That Gives Rise to Neuroblastoma, an Aggressive Childhood Cancer
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 30, 2015 , ... Until now, the St. Louis Fetal Care Institute ... of Myelomeningocele Study) trial. One of these exclusion criteria was a BMI above 34.9. ... to 24.9 is considered normal, 25 - 29.9 is overweight and above 30 is ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Thermi™, a world ... announce that its ThermiRFR temperature controlled radiofrequency platform has received CE marking and ... platform which uses temperature as a clinical endpoint. The technology has been ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The world of hair transplants and restoration is ... These techniques and procedures have been in use for many years and are among ... Parsa Mohebi, M.D. has utilized many of these methods over the years, he also ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The presidential race normally ... styling. So why is it a national news story when Donald Trump makes disparaging ... M.D., because appearances count more than anyone wants to admit when it comes to ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , ... November 30, 2015 , ... According to Los ... people to overeat are not necessarily caused by real hunger, but instead by ... needs food. He notes that, while many patients are aware that weight loss surgery ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... 2015   Royal Philips  (NYSE: PHG ... Radiology Solutions, a fully integrated, consultative approach to ... data-driven practice management approaches that combine imaging systems, ... improve care delivery and reduce costs. Making its ... North America Annual Meeting (RSNA) in ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... -- global cell culture market is expected to ... by 2022 at a CAGR of 7.1% therein. --> ... 2013 value of US$6.1 bn to US$11.3 bn by 2022 at ... has announced the release of a new market research study, detailing ... Culture Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , Nov. 30, 2015   Royal Philips ... Implant, the industry,s first MRI guided user interface and ... of patients with MR Conditional implants, such as knee ... 2015 Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting ... and supports diagnostic confidence of this growing patient population. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: