Navigation Links
African-Americans with blood cancer do not live as long as Caucasians, despite equal care

A new analysis has found that among patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, African Americans more commonly present with advanced disease, and they tend to have shorter survival times than Caucasians despite receiving the same care. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the results suggest that biological factors may account for some racial disparities in cancer survival.

Among cancer patients, minorities tend to have a worse prognosis than Caucasians for reasons that are unclear. In African American patients, lower socioeconomic status and limited access to high-quality care often can play a role, but some researchers propose that certain cancers can behave more aggressively in minority individuals, which also can lead to worse outcomes.

Because chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a type of blood cancer, is rare in African Americans, investigators from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and the Duke University Medical Center in Durham led a study that combined the two centers' experiences with African American and Caucasian patients. Their analysis included 84 African American patients and 1,571 non-black patients referred to the two centers. All patients, regardless of race, had access to healthcare services and received the same treatments. "We sought to isolate race as a prognostic factor from other known demographic and clinical prognostic parameters in CLL," explained Dr. Falchi.

The investigators found that while the time from diagnosis (made either incidentally or because of clinical symptoms) to referral was shorter for African Americans than Caucasian patients, African Americans were more likely to have CLL that was more advanced at the time of referral. Also, although African Americans responded as well to first-line therapy as Caucasian patients, their cancer progressed more rapidly and their survival was shorter. The inferior survival of African American patients persisted when patients were grouped according to factors related to the severity of their disease.

"These findings suggest that while inducing similarly high response rates, standard treatments do not overcome racial differences in outcome among patients with CLL," said Dr. Ferrajoli. She added that a number of questions remain unanswered. For example, do distinct biologic characteristics of African American patients with CLL account for the disparities seen in this study? And will these findings hold in the general population, where the impact of socioeconomic status may be more varied?

In an accompanying editorial, Christopher Flowers, MD, of Emory University in Atlanta, and Barbara Pro, MD, of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, noted that to adequately study disparities in leukemia, investigators will need to collect specimens and clinical data from patients to examine the potential impact of molecular and biologic markers. "Future studies in CLL can use this work as a cornerstone for investigating racial disparities in this disease," they wrote.


Contact: Ben Norman

Related medicine news :

1. Age-related smelling loss significantly worse in African-Americans
2. African-Americans experience longer delays between diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer
3. Vitamin D may lower blood pressure in African-Americans
4. UC research examines interventions in treating African-Americans with substance abuse
5. Exercise linked with reduced prostate cancer risk in Caucasians but not African-Americans
6. Blood pressure diet works, but adherence drops among African-Americans
7. HPV improves survival for African-Americans with throat cancer
8. WSU study finds overwhelming evidence of hidden heart disease in hypertensive African-Americans
9. African Americans with blood cancer do not live as long as caucasians, despite equal care
10. DNA particles in the blood may help speed detection of coronary artery disease
11. New red blood simulator invented at Queen Mary
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... for mental health and wellness consultation, has collaborated with Women’s Web – ... their reader’s queries on topics on mental and emotional well-being relationship, life ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... where preparing the perfect dish and pleasing the palates of attendees is of ... bringing a dish to a seasonal get-together, give these recipes a try this ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Dr. John Pierce, Medical Director ... about hair loss treatment with the Capillus272™ Pro laser therapy cap. FDA cleared for ... and fuller hair, without the need for surgery, prescription pills, or topical foams. ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... According to an article published November ... more widely heralded as a breakthrough for performing hernia repairs. The article explains that ... surgery is that it can greatly reduce the pain that a patient might otherwise ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Raton, Florida (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 ... ... diagnostic testing for physicians and athletic programs, launches new Wimbledon Athletics ... importance of testing young athletes for unsuspected cardiac abnormalities. About 2,000 people under ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015  Amgen (NASDAQ: ... License Application (BLA) with the United States ... ABP 501, a biosimilar candidate to Humira ® ... biosimilar application submitted to the FDA and represents Amgen,s ... Sean E. Harper , M.D., executive vice president ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015  Linden Care, LLC, ... optimizing treatment outcomes for patients suffering from chronic pain, ... for a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) enjoining Express Scripts ... two companies. --> --> ... all of its legal options. --> ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015 On Tuesday, November 24, ... trial against Wright Medical Technology, Inc. for product ... metal-on-metal hip implant device, awarded $11 million in ... week trial and three days of deliberations, the ... was defectively designed and unreasonably dangerous, and that ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: