Navigation Links
African-American women still have poorer breast cancer outcomes
Date:5/4/2009

CHICAGO (May 4, 2009) New research published in the May issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows that dramatic disparities in breast cancer outcomes continue to exist for African-American women, regardless of the age at which they are diagnosed, extent of the cancer, type of treatment or socioeconomic status. The study represents the largest population-based analysis of breast cancer outcomes data to date, including more than 60,000 patients in the state of Florida.

Although government programs to improve access to breast cancer screening and treatment have been in place for nearly two decades, African-American women continue to suffer a high breast cancer mortality rate, even though the incidence of breast cancer in this population is lower than in Caucasian women.

The research indicates that breast cancer outcomes for African-American women might be improved by lowering the recommended age of initial screening from 40 years to 33 years, the age at which the percentage of African-American women who develop breast cancer is similar to the percentage of Caucasian women in whom the disease develops under 40 years of age.

"Current screening guidelines are not sufficient in detecting breast cancer in African-American patients because the disease has already developed in over 10 percent of these women by age 40," said Leonidas G. Koniaris, MD, FACS, Surgical Oncology DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine. "However, even with earlier diagnosis, our analysis uncovered serious socioeconomic barriers that prevent many African-American women with breast cancer from receiving the latest, most specific treatments."

The analysis identified 63,472 patients with invasive breast cancer using the Florida Cancer Data System and data from the state's Agency for Health Care Administration. Overall, 90.5 percent of patients were Caucasian and 7.6 percent were African American. More than half of the study population (59.4 percent) lived at or below 10 percent of the federal poverty level, according to the 2007 United States Census Bureau report. Five-year survival was calculated from the time of initial diagnosis to the date of last contact or death.

African-American patients presented with breast cancer at a younger age and a more advanced stage, with approximately 72.1 percent of African-American women diagnosed before the age of 65, in comparison with 50.3 percent among Caucasian women (p<0.001). Whereas the majority (68 percent) of Caucasian women were diagnosed with disease that had not spread beyond the breast, only 52.4 percent of African-American women presented with localized disease. Metastatic disease was seen nearly twice as often in African-American women when compared with Caucasian women (5.9 percent versus 3.1 percent; p<0.001). Overall, African-American women had a significantly lower overall five-year survival rate compared with Caucasian women (68.6 versus 79.4 percent, p<0.001).

Upon diagnosis, African-American patients were less likely than Caucasian patients to undergo surgical therapy. Furthermore, among those patients who did undergo surgical therapy, survival rates for African-American women were still considerably lower than for Caucasian women. Similarly, African-American patients who received nonsurgical therapy (e.g., chemotherapy) had a lower rate of survival compared with Caucasian patients who received similar treatments.

A stepwise multivariate analysis revealed a significant decrease in the risk of death observed for African-American patients upon adjustment for stage of presentation, suggesting that disparities in breast cancer outcomes are, in part, a result of advanced stage at diagnosis.

Researchers also identified socioeconomic status as an independent predictor of poor breast cancer outcomes. Patients in the lowest socioeconomic status category (>15 percent living under the federal poverty level) were diagnosed with higher rates of metastatic disease (4.1 percent vs. 2.8 percent; p<0.001) than patients in the higher-income categories. Patients of low socioeconomic status were treated less frequently with surgical therapy. Five-year survival was statistically decreased as poverty level increased for all types of treatment, whether surgical or nonsurgical.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
Weber Shandwick Worldwide
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Primary biliary cirrhosis more severe in African-American and Hispanic patients
2. Older African-American men with HIV often have sex without condoms
3. Education program leads to lasting improvement of cancer knowledge in African-Americans
4. Breast cancer is more aggressive in African-American women
5. St. Jude Program Reduces Weight Gain in Young African-American Girls
6. St. Jude program reduces weight gain in young African-American girls
7. Cancer risks for urban African-American women grow, healthy diets more difficult to maintain
8. Biological markers of prostate cancer shed light on cancer burden faced by African-American men
9. The Magic Johnson Foundation and Abbott Expand Focus of Campaign to End Black AIDS to African-American Women in 2008
10. Childhood sleep-disordered breathing disproportionately affects obese and African-Americans
11. Cookie Johnson and Abbott Bring I Stand With Magic: Campaign to End Black AIDS to Los Angeles to Educate African-American Women on HIV/AIDS
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/24/2016)... Indianapolis, IN (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 ... ... employee benefits advisory organization, is pleased to welcome new Partner Firm Austin & ... a personalized, consultative approach to insurance, employee benefits, HR consulting, benefits technology, and ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... New Brunswick, New Jersey: This year ... needs reach their fullest potential. To commemorate the anniversary, the hospital has themed the ... n’ Roll for Children’s Specialized Hospital Foundation on Saturday, May 21, at Johnson Park ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... for physical disease or injury that focuses on repairing the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular ... With an emphasis on functional restoration, NYDNRehab began providing treatments for physical therapy ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , ... May 24, 2016 , ... Growing in popularity, ... trend, more gluten-free products are available and easily accessible. Whether someone chooses to cut ... cater to a certain diet, King Kullen Grocery stocks their shelves with many different ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... OR (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... welcomed Peggy Kinst, a wellness specialist for forty years and a trainer for ... the Sharon Kleyne Hour Radio Talk Show on May 16, 2016. , Formerly ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/23/2016)... May 23, 2016 Non-invasive diagnostic ... of multiple diseases; ,Technology to be presented at Yissum’s ... Yissum Research Development Company of the Hebrew University of ... research agreement with Aurum Ventures MKI, the technology investment arm ... a new diagnostic approach for early detection of multiple ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... May 23, 2016 Gamida Cell, ... treatment of cancer and orphan genetic diseases, announced today ... $4.4 million from the Israel Innovation Authority (formerly the ... of Economy and Industry. The mission of the Israel ... various industries, including science and technology, while stimulating economic ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... 2016   Purdue Pharma L.P.  today announced ... with Egalet Corporation and Acura Pharmaceuticals, Inc. that ... the agreement the companies will exchange valuable patent ... companies to develop and sell several opioid pain ... reflects the commitment of Purdue Pharma to seek ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: