Navigation Links
African-American seniors at twice the risk for mental abuse, 5 times for financial exploitation
Date:9/28/2010

PITTSBURGHIn the first population-based survey to indicate a racial disparity in the psychological abuse of senior citizens, University of Pittsburgh researchers found that African American seniors could be twice as likely to be mistreated than elders of other races. The survey also revealed that African American elders could be up to five times more susceptible to being swindled. Reporting the survey results in The Gerontologist, the researchers urged that health care and social service workers be especially vigilant for the possible mistreatment of African American seniors.

Lead author Scott Beach, assistant director of Pitt's University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR) and director of the center's Survey Research Program, said the study is important to the developing field of elderly abuse research. Beach worked with coauthors Richard Schulz, director of UCSUR and the center's gerontology program; Nicholas Castle, a professor of health policy and management in Pitt's Graduate School of Public Health; and Jules Rosen, a professor of psychiatry in Pitt's School of Medicine.

The Pitt survey is among only a few that focus on race as a specific factor in elder mistreatment, Beach said. In addition, the population-based survey collected information directly from senior citizens through face-to-face and telephone interviews, the most effective way to document unreported abuse, he explained; typically, elder mistreatment data is gathered from complaints filed with Adult Protective Services. In this way, the Pitt study helps fill a noted gap in elder mistreatment research: The National Research Council, in its 2003 report, Elder Mistreatment, described existing elder abuse research as having "a number of weaknesses," including a lack of clear, consistent definitions and an absence of population-based data.

The team interviewed 903 adultsa statistically large sampleaged 60 and older living in Pennsylvania's Allegheny County about instances of psychological abuse and financial exploitation occurring within the past 6 months and since they had turned 60. The sample contained 210 African Americans, or 23.2 percent of respondents, which is nearly twice the proportion of African Americans living in Allegheny County, Beach said.

Psychological mistreatment included being yelled at or insulted, having personal property destroyed, and receiving threats of injury, stoppage of care, or being sent to a nursing home. Among African Americans, 24.4 percent reported being abused since turning 60 and 16.1 percent reported psychological mistreatment within the past 6 months. Around half as many non-Black seniors reported abuse with 13.2 percent claiming psychological abuse since turning 60 and 7.2 percent saying it happened within the previous half-year. Interestingly, African Americans were usually less upset by aggressive behavior, yet more African Americans reported being "extremely upset" when deliberately insulted or when their belongings were destroyed.

African Americans reported even higher instances of financial exploitation, which was defined as having checks stolen, having money tampered with, and being made to sign documents they did not understand. Only 8.4 percent of non-African American elders reported being cheated since turning 60 and a mere 2.4 percent said it happened within the past 6 months. On the other hand, 23 percent of African Americans claimed that someone meddled with their money since they turned 60 and 12.9 percent said it occurred recently.

Most striking about the team's findings was that the racial disparity in mental abuse or financial exploitation was not explained by additional factors such as education, health, age, or socioeconomic status, Beach said. On average, African Americans in the survey tended to be slightly younger, less educated, and more likely to be single, divorced, or widowed. Nonetheless, non-African Americans of similar means, years, schooling, and marital status were still less likely to report mistreatment or financial deceit, Beach said.

Beach plans to follow up on the survey by including seniors from other parts of the country, interviewing the perpetrators, and developing more standardized definitions of the various types of psychological mistreatment and financial exploitation.


'/>"/>

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mekelly@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. African-Americans attitudes about lung cancer may hinder prevention
2. Step Up to Speak Up Events Use Spoken Word and African-American Greek Tradition of Stepping to Raise Awareness for Organ and Tissue Donation
3. New Report Says African-Americans and Hispanics More Likely to Have Alzheimers Disease And Dementia Than Whites
4. New Report says African-Americans Two Times More Likely to Have Alzheimers Disease and Dementia Than Whites
5. African-American infants at increased risk from tobacco smoke exposure
6. Definitive diabetes indicator deceptively high in African-American children
7. African-Americans and women are less likely to undergo bone marrow transplantation
8. Investigators identify gene associated with kidney disease in African-American population
9. Lack of trust in hospitals a major deterrent for blood donation among African-Americans
10. No link between genetic ancestry, asthma response in African-Americans
11. Caring Rose Home Care Launched To Help Seniors Live Independently
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... As part of the nationwide ... honor the victims of the Holocaust and Nazi persecution, Center for Medicine after ... Auschwitz on its CMATH Champions trip to Germany and Poland next week. , The ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... TX (PRWEB) , ... April 24, 2017 , ... The ... the glitterati, those unreal icons inhabiting the rarified air of pop and film stardom.(1) ... paparazzi and anyone snapping pictures: the smile. Grins now run the gamut from being ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... April 24, 2017 , ... The ... $1.6 million in charitable dental services to 1,961 people during the April 22-23 event ... at no charge to Californians who experience barriers to care, CDA Cares educates the ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... Veteran Theresa James awoke to the sound of her ... In “Healing Tears,” James depicts every parent’s worst nightmare, when her three children were ... conversations and situations throughout my divorce,” James said. “After the death of my children, ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... Boca Raton, Florida (PRWEB) , ... April 24, ... ... that develops a variety of unique liquid food supplements, announced its popular products ... of nutritional products. , ALP Nutrition® prioritizes the use of premium natural ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... BOSTON , April 20, 2017   ZappRx, Inc ... the specialty drug prescribing process, today announced it closed $25 ... Fund, a venture capital firm based in Seattle ... Qiming Venture Partners . The Series B round included ... A round in 2014, and GV (formerly Google ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... Service (Manufacturing, Research), By Country, (Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, Argentina, Chile, ... their offering. ... Latin American pharmaceutical contract manufacturing services market is anticipated to ... registration cost in Latin American countries and continuous economic growth ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... NEW YORK , April 19, 2017 ... Surgical drainage devices are tubes used to remove excess ... include, blood, serum, pus, urine, bile or lymph. Surgical ... types of surgery such as orthopedics surgery, cardiovascular surgery, ... device is prophylactic post-surgery to prevent accumulation of fluid ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: