Navigation Links
African-American men living in poor sunlight areas at risk for vitamin D deficiency
Date:9/20/2011

WASHINGTON, D.C. African-American men living in low sunlight areas are more likely to experience vitamin D deficiency than European-American men living in the same environment. Researchers believe that these findings should change recommendations for daily intake of vitamin D.

"This study shows that across the board vitamin D recommendations just won't work for everybody," said Adam B. Murphy, M.D., M.B.A., clinical instructor in the department of urology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who reported the study at the Fourth AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities, held Sept. 18-21, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

"With so many diseases linked to low levels of vitamin D, we should have more stratified recommendations to consider groups within the population instead of making monolithic suggestions," he added.

Researchers evaluated the marker for vitamin D the 25 hydroxyvitamin D level (25-OH D level) in 492 men aged 40 to 79 years who lived in Chicago, a low ultraviolet radiation (UVR) part of the country. Of that group, 93 percent of African-American men and 69.7 percent of European-American men were vitamin D deficient; having 25-OH D levels of less than 30 ng/mL.

Results showed that vitamin D levels were low in African American men, those with lower income and those with higher body mass index. Low sunlight exposure is a known factor in lower levels of vitamin D, but researchers found that African American men still had lower levels of vitamin D in sunnier seasons.

Murphy attributes low vitamin D levels to the composition of African-American skin, which contains more of the pigment melanin than lighter skin. When UVR light hits the skin cells, it reacts with the molecule 7-dehydrocholesterol to begin the production of vitamin D, which is then further processed by the body to make active vitamin D. In African-Americans, though, melanin blocks UVR rays from being absorbed, thus reducing the amount of vitamin D naturally produced.

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to multiple diseases, including breast cancer, prostate cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, which is why Murphy believes it is essential to adjust recommendations to reflect differences between African Americans and European-Americans.

"Because we have a lot of special populations in the United States people who have darker skin, people who cover their skin for religious reasons and people who live in poor sunlight environments there shouldn't be uniform vitamin D recommendations for the entire population," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jeremy Moore
Jeremy.Moore@aacr.org
267-646-0557
American Association for Cancer Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Genetic differences may cause higher rates of prostate cancer in African-American men
2. Obesity and large waist size linked to higher risk of death in African-American women
3. BU identifies contributors to high incidence of breast cancer in African-American women
4. New data-based strategies and treatment models can improve diabetes care for older African-Americans
5. Genetic map of African-Americans to aid study of diseases, human evolution
6. More oxygen in eyes of African-Americans may help explain glaucoma risk
7. CT angiography improves detection of heart disease in African-Americans
8. New genetic risk factors of lupus found in study of African-American women
9. Why disparities in dental care persist for African-Americans even when they have insurance coverage
10. Screening helps African-American students connect with school-based mental health services
11. Low vitamin D levels seen as multiple sclerosis risk for African-Americans, UCSF study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. announced that 20 Florida attorneys ... peers for this recognition are considered among the top 2 percent of lawyers practicing ... members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: Miami Shareholders Mark D. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Comfort Keepers® ... American Cancer Society and the Road To Recovery® program to drive cancer patients to ... and other adults to ensure the highest quality of life and ongoing independence. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the U.S. are sharpening their pencils ... an essay contest in which patients and their families pay tribute to a genetic ... 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) this September. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Haute Beauty ... Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and the network’s newest partner. ... and the most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic surgery should be invisible.” ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Strategic Capital Partners, LLC ... by obtaining investment capital for emerging technology companies. SCP has delivered investment ... resulted in more than a million dollars of capital investment for five companies. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... Belgium , June 24, 2016 ... the appointment of Dr. Edward Futcher ... Non-Executive Director, effective June 23, 2016.Dr. Futcher was ... Nominations and Governance Committees.  As a non-executive member ... independent expertise and strategic counsel to VolitionRx in ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the ... to 2022" report to their offering. ... patients with kidney failure, it replaces the function of kidneys ... blood and thus the treatment helps to keep the patient ... Increasing number of ESRD patients & substantial ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... startling report released today, National Safety Council research shows ... plan to eliminate prescription opioid overdoses. Prescription Nation ... the worst drug crisis in recorded U.S. history, assigned a "Making ... , New Mexico , Tennessee ... states, three – Michigan , Missouri ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: