Navigation Links
Abnormal 'editing' of gene messages may be a cause of lupus
Date:5/19/2008

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Researchers at Wake Forest University have uncovered evidence that the abnormal editing of gene messages in a type of white blood cell may be behind the development of lupus. Scientists hope the finding will lead to earlier diagnosis, a way to monitor patients response to therapy and possibly a new way to treat the disease.

The findings, reported online in the journal Immunology, involve an enzyme that edits and modifies the messages of genes before the protein-making process. It is protein molecules that carry out the instructions of our genes and determine how an organism looks, how well its body metabolizes food or fights infection, and even how it behaves.

Dama Laxminarayana, Ph.D., assistant professor of internal medicine and senior author, said that in systemic lupus erythematosus, the normal editing process goes awry, causing a shift in the balance of proteins that results in impaired functions in T cells, a type of white blood cell involved in the regulation of immune functions.

Impaired T cell function is a hallmark of lupus, a complex chronic autoimmune disorder that can range from a benign skin disorder to severe, life-threatening multisystem disease. It primarily affects women in the child-bearing years and is more common in blacks.

The current research, which involved 13 patients with lupus and eight healthy participants, was based on Laxminarayanas earlier findings that 150-kDa ADAR1, one of the three enzymes involved in editing gene messages, is higher in the T cells of lupus patients compared to those without lupus. ADARs are ademosine deaminases that act on RNA.

Laxminarayana made the initial finding about 150-kDa ADAR1 levels in 2002 and has been working to solve the mystery of how it is related to the development of lupus. In the current study, Laxminarayana found that the higher levels of 150-kDa ADAR1 alters the editing induced by two other ADAR enzymes and may cause an imbalance of proteins. Editing by the two other ADAR enzymes is a normal cellular process; it is 150-kDa ADAR1 that causes normal editing to go awry.

The process is complicated and took Laxminarayana years to uncover. The current studies demonstrate that, essentially, too much 150-kDa ADAR1 results in an increase in the gene message of Phosphodiesterase 8A1 (PDE8A1), which is involved in the disruption of normal cell signaling and impairing cell function.

150-kDa ADAR1 is the culprit, Laxminarayana said. We are now working to find a safe way to block it.

In addition to targeting the enzyme as a treatment strategy, Laxminarayana said 150-kDa ADAR1 could also be used as a biomarker to detect the disease earlier, to monitor how patients respond to therapy, and to measure disease intensity.


'/>"/>

Contact: Karen Richardson
krchrdsn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4453
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Clinical depression linked to abnormal emotional brain circuits
2. Grant Supports Study of Abnormal Ring-Shaped Chromosomes
3. Abnormal immune cells may cause unprovoked anaphylaxis
4. Abnormal glutamine repeats interfere with key transcription factor, leading to neurodegeneration
5. CT colonography detects wide-range of extracolonic abnormalities in elderly patients
6. Scientists identify brain abnormalities underlying key element of borderline personality disorder
7. Body Abnormalities, Childhood Cancer May Share Genes
8. Chromosome Abnormalities Raise Risk for Autism
9. Siblings of schizophrenia patients display subtle shape abnormalities in brain
10. HRT Can Lead to Abnormal Mammograms, Biopsies
11. LA BioMed study finds hormone therapy increases frequency of abnormal mammograms, breast biopsies
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Today, the Whole-Food Warrior TV ... the much-anticipated feature with author Jahnavi Foster, specialist in healthy vegetarian cuisine, will stream ... Each week, on his weekly Whole-Food Warrior TV show, Frank Davis highlights Whole-Food Warriors ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... to announce the addition of micro-needling services in their Napa Valley office. The ... founders of Plastic Surgery Associates, Dr. Canales and Dr. Furnas, are part of ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Miami, Florida (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 ... ... largest non-profit organization devoted exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the ... services – is poised to once again host, Swirl, A Wine Tasting Event ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Regular gym users know the routine: ... wait longer to access the treadmills. It’s a predictable trend. After the excesses of ... and get in shape by joining gyms, starting new walking or running routines, or ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... At its annual ... Patrick McDermott as Chairman of the National Board of Directors. Mr. McDermott succeeds former ... the Board,” stated Leslie A. Chambers , APDA President and CEO. “Pat has ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... , Feb. 5, 2016 Aethlon Medical, Inc. (Nasdaq: ... Chairman and CEO, will be presenting at Source Capital Group,s ... York, NY at 2:15 p.m. ET on Wednesday, ... Immunotherapy Panel discussion taking place at 3:15 p.m. ET. ... approximately one hour after the conclusion of the live event. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Feb. 5, 2016  Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE ... previously announced underwritten secondary offering of 11,027,558 shares of ... of affiliates of Blackstone and Goldman Sachs.  The shares ... price of $96.45 per share. The selling stockholders will ... Zimmer Biomet nor any of its directors, officers or ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... France , Germany ... and Israel ). It includes a 10-year epidemiology forecast ... segmented by age and sex in these markets. GD epidemiology report is ... in-depth, high quality, transparent and market-driven, providing expert analysis of disease trends ... Germany , Italy , Spain ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: