Navigation Links
APBI associated with more mastectomies, toxicities, complications, compared to traditional radiation
Date:5/1/2012

Houston, TX - Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) brachytherapy, the localized form of radiation therapy growing increasingly popular as a treatment choice for women with early-stage breast cancer, is associated with higher rate of later mastectomy, increased radiation-related toxicities and post-operative complications, compared to traditional whole breast irradiation (WBI), according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

The retrospective study, appears in the current issue of JAMA; it was first presented in the CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Benjamin Smith, M.D., assistant professor in MD Anderson's Department of Radiation Oncology, is the study's senior author.

"Our study compared the two radiation therapy techniques available to women with early-stage breast cancer. We found that women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation therapy have a two-fold increased risk for subsequent mastectomy, most likely because of tumor recurrence or local complications, as well as an increased risk for post-operative and radiation-related complications," said Smith.

There are numerous types of APBI; the MD Anderson study only looked at the brachytherapy technique, which is a form of radiation treatment involving insertion of a catheter containing a radioactive source to kill breast cancer cells that may remain after lumpectomy surgery. A specialized catheter is surgically inserted into the cavity left behind after tumor removal. APBI brachytherapy is performed a few weeks after a lumpectomy, twice daily over a course of five to seven days.

APBI brachytherapy has grown in popularity over the past decade, since earlier studies showed generally low cancer recurrence rates, though most prior studies have not directly compared the outcomes of APBI brachytherapy to traditional radiation therapy, explained Smith.

The first commercially-available single catheter to deliver partial breast irradiation was approved by the FDA in 2002, escalating APBI's use, said Ben Smith.

The MD Anderson study was based on analysis of claim forms filed by 92,735 Medicare beneficiaries nationwide, who were diagnosed with cancer between 2003 and 2007.

"In our study of Medicare patients, we found a consistent increase in APBI brachytherapy, from less than 3.5 percent in 2003 to 13 percent in 2007. It's our guess that this trend has continued," said Smith.

There are benefits to the practicality APBI offers women, noted Smith.

"For whole breast irradiation, the standard treatment time is between five and seven weeks, but studies have shown that some women experience delays or have obstacles completing their course of radiation. Treatment delays and incompletion are known to increase the risk of cancer recurrence in the breast. APBI brachytherapy is attractive because it has the potential to address those issues, because treatment only lasts one week."

However, it's also an invasive procedure with the greater potential for side-effects that are not associated with a non-invasive therapy, such as WBI, noted Smith.

For the retrospective population-based study, the MD Anderson team used Medicare claims to examine the treatment history of 92,735 women age 67 and older diagnosed with early-stage, invasive breast cancer between 2000 and 2007. All of the women were treated with breast-conserving surgery followed by either APBI, delivered by brachytherapy, or traditional radiation therapy.

The researchers analyzed for effectiveness of radiation (defined as the need for a later mastectomy), post-operative complications (infectious and non-infectious), and post-radiation complications (breast pain, fat necrosis and rib fracture).

At five years, the incidence of mastectomy was statistically significantly higher in the APBI brachytherapy-treatment group compared to that of the WBI, 4 percent and 2.2 percent, respectively. APBI brachytherapy was also found to be associated with a higher incidence of acute and late toxicities, compared to those of WBI - infectious complications, 16 and 10 percent, respectively; non-infectious complications, 16 percent and 9 percent, respectively; - and post-radiation complications - five-year incidence of rib fracture, 4.5 and 3.6 percent, respectively; fat necrosis, 8 and 4 percent, respectively; and breast pain, 15 percent and 12 percent, respectively.

The researchers note the study's limits, including that it was not randomized, the relatively-short follow up of patients and limited details regarding tumor characteristics were available.

Given the findings, communication between the patient and her physician is paramount so that a woman with breast cancer can make an informed, personalized decision, said Thomas A. Buchholz, M.D., professor and head of the Division of Radiation Oncology at MD Anderson, and an author on the paper.

"This is a very important, well-designed study in a large cohort of patients and provides the first comparison of these two popular radiation techniques after breast-conserving surgery," said Buchholz, also an author on the study. "It's important to note that in both groups, we found a relatively low risk of recurrence. Still, we have a responsibility to discuss potential risks and benefits with our patients, while we await definitive results from randomized trials."

National randomized trials comparing APBI brachytherapy to WBI are ongoing. MD Anderson will continue offering APBI to interested patients in the context of ongoing institutional and multi-institutional clinical protocols, says Buchholz.


'/>"/>

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Certain genetic profiles associated with recurrence-free survival for non-small cell lung cancer
2. Certain pain medications do not appear to be associated with skin cancer risk
3. News brief: ALDH associated with worse overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma
4. New research shows emotional impact of low sexual desire and associated distress
5. Increased HAART coverage associated with 50 percent drop
6. Pretreatment SUV associated with head and neck cancer treatment outcomes, may help decide treatment plans
7. New developments in nanotechnology tackle the 2 biggest problems associated with chemotherapy
8. MedQuist Launches EHR Integration for Dictations Associated with Template-based Clinical Documentation
9. Hormone thought to slow aging associated with increased risk of cancer death
10. Common osteoporosis drugs are associated with a decrease in risk of breast cancer
11. Coffee Drinking and Caffeine Associated With Reduced Risk of Hospitalization for Heart Rhythm Disturbances
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
APBI associated with more mastectomies, toxicities, complications, compared to traditional radiation
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible lice infestation, as reported ... head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human host, and to infest ... in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. , As lice are ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... As ... with Magna Cum Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine ... and returned to Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches ... success. In terms of the latter, setting the bar too high can result in ... than just slow progress toward their goal. , Research from PsychTests.com ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World Sickle ... chronic pain and the benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center of ... Sickle Cell Disease. , Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the red ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. announced that 20 Florida attorneys ... peers for this recognition are considered among the top 2 percent of lawyers practicing ... members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: Miami Shareholders Mark D. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016  Guerbet announced today that it ... Supplier Horizon Award . One of 12 ... recognized for its support of Premier members through exceptional ... excellence, and commitment to lower costs. ... recognition of our outstanding customer service from Premier," says ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Research ... "Surgical Procedure Volumes: Global Analysis (United States, China, Japan, ... report to their offering. ... tool for healthcare business planners, provides surgical procedure volume ... surgery trends with an in-depth analysis of growth drivers ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... NEW YORK , June 23, 2016 ... rough waters, but it continues to present great opportunities ... featured companies for today: Intrexon Corp. (NYSE: ... ), Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ARNA ), ... Learn more about these stocks and receive your complimentary ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: