Navigation Links
A safer, more effective morphine may be possible with Indiana University discovery
Date:3/24/2011

INDIANAPOLIS An orphan drug originally used for HIV treatment has been found to short-circuit the process that results in additional sensitivity and pain from opioid use. The study by researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine is reported in the March 25, 2011 issue of Brain, Behavior and Immunity.

The researchers say the finding in animal models may ultimately make morphine a safer and more effective drug.

Traditionally opioids were used to relieve pain following surgery, from cancer and at the end of life. Today opioids are used widely for chronically painful conditions like osteoarthritis and back pain and may need to be prescribed for decades.

Morphine, the gold standard for controlling moderate to severe pain, has debilitating side effects including reduced respiration, constipation, itching and addiction. Patients also develop a tolerance to morphine which can lead to a complicated spiral.

"In addition to the recognized side effects, morphine actually creates sensitivity and causes more pain through inducing an inflammatory response in the body," said first author Natalie Wilson, a National Science Foundation Fellow at the IU School of Medicine.

This increased sensitivity is clinically known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Frequently, patients receiving opioids for pain control may actually become more sensitive to certain painful stimuli necessitating an increased opioid dosage. OIH may also represent one of many reasons for declining levels of analgesia while receiving opioids or a worsening pain syndrome.

"The drug itself is producing its own new pain," said Fletcher A. White, Ph.D., Vergil K. Stoelting Professor of Anesthesia and director of Anesthesia Research at the IU School of Medicine. "I tend to view it as an injury as it appears to be creating another pain."

Dr. White explained that morphine sets into motion a cascade of events, one of which is to increase molecular communication to and from the nerves by a protein known as CXCR4. This increase in CXCR4 signaling contributes to a neuroinflammatory response causing increased sensitivity and additional pain.

Drs. Wilson and White and colleagues administered AMD3100, an orphan drug known to block the CXCR4 response, to rats. By halting the signaling process, the researchers interrupted the OIH response, Dr. White explained. "If this translates appropriately in people, this application would likely make morphine a safer, more effective drug for chronic pain control."


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary L. Hardin
mhardin@iupui.edu
317-274-7722
Indiana University School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Electronic Health Information Leader Says Physician Practice Redesign is Vital Next Step Towards Safer, More Effective Care Delivery
2. Why do physicians order costly CTs? Ultrasound yields better diagnosis, safer, less costly
3. Study finds everolimus-eluting stent safer, more effective than paclitaxel-eluting stent
4. Toys Getting Safer, But Dangers Still Lurk: Report
5. Secrets of plant warfare underpin quest for safer, more secure global food supply
6. Low forms of cyclin E reduce breast cancer drugs effectiveness
7. Gastric Banding Most Effective for Obese Teens
8. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
9. China Cord Blood Corporation Warrant Registration Statement Declared Effective by SEC
10. Charging less for more effective treatments could reduce health care costs while improving health
11. Split-course palliative radiotherapy confirmed as effective treatment for advanced NSCLC
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
A safer, more effective morphine may be possible with Indiana University discovery
(Date:5/25/2016)... FL (PRWEB) , ... May 25, 2016 , ... ... Cross Benefit Clearinghouse supporting the real time adjudication of medical service claims by ... providers using their current medical claims management software. The TransactRx Cross Benefit Clearinghouse ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... ... than fifty years, we've suffered whiplash as each new scientific study seemed to contradict the ... advice – advice that was supposed to keep us healthy and slim. And what happened? ... considered to be overweight and more than 1 in 3 adults are considered to be ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... ... Consumer access to organic foods and grower access to food processers is about ... and other plant-based foods, will introduce the first consumer product (a new breakfast cereal) ... Organic Products. , The transitional designation means the cereal was made using at least ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 , ... According ... found that a group of people randomly assigned to reduce the amount of calories ... a 12 percent drop in body weight enjoyed better sleep, improved quality of life, ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... services to provide one resource, from start to finish, for Life Safety compliance. ... Statement of Condition surveys requested by the Joint Commission, and fire stopping reviews, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016 ... médica para ayudar a los médicos a compartir sus ... pacientes a escala mundial. Profesionales médicos de Europa, África, ... se han apuntado a la aplicación, que combina la ... un entorno totalmente seguro. Educación   ...
(Date:5/24/2016)...   , Study met ... and superiority in , Excellent plus ... of the ascending colon   , ... B.V. today announced new positive data from the phase III MORA ... standard 2 litre PEG with ascorbate. The study met both primary ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016 ARANZ ... for the healthcare sector, has been named the Coretex Hi-Tech ... Awards 2016. Dr Bruce Davey , CEO ... our team.  It,s really good to be recognised for the ... Our products are used in 35 countries around the world ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: