Navigation Links
A safer, more effective morphine may be possible with Indiana University discovery
Date:3/24/2011

INDIANAPOLIS An orphan drug originally used for HIV treatment has been found to short-circuit the process that results in additional sensitivity and pain from opioid use. The study by researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine is reported in the March 25, 2011 issue of Brain, Behavior and Immunity.

The researchers say the finding in animal models may ultimately make morphine a safer and more effective drug.

Traditionally opioids were used to relieve pain following surgery, from cancer and at the end of life. Today opioids are used widely for chronically painful conditions like osteoarthritis and back pain and may need to be prescribed for decades.

Morphine, the gold standard for controlling moderate to severe pain, has debilitating side effects including reduced respiration, constipation, itching and addiction. Patients also develop a tolerance to morphine which can lead to a complicated spiral.

"In addition to the recognized side effects, morphine actually creates sensitivity and causes more pain through inducing an inflammatory response in the body," said first author Natalie Wilson, a National Science Foundation Fellow at the IU School of Medicine.

This increased sensitivity is clinically known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Frequently, patients receiving opioids for pain control may actually become more sensitive to certain painful stimuli necessitating an increased opioid dosage. OIH may also represent one of many reasons for declining levels of analgesia while receiving opioids or a worsening pain syndrome.

"The drug itself is producing its own new pain," said Fletcher A. White, Ph.D., Vergil K. Stoelting Professor of Anesthesia and director of Anesthesia Research at the IU School of Medicine. "I tend to view it as an injury as it appears to be creating another pain."

Dr. White explained that morphine sets into motion a cascade of events, one of which is to increase molecular communication to and from the nerves by a protein known as CXCR4. This increase in CXCR4 signaling contributes to a neuroinflammatory response causing increased sensitivity and additional pain.

Drs. Wilson and White and colleagues administered AMD3100, an orphan drug known to block the CXCR4 response, to rats. By halting the signaling process, the researchers interrupted the OIH response, Dr. White explained. "If this translates appropriately in people, this application would likely make morphine a safer, more effective drug for chronic pain control."


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary L. Hardin
mhardin@iupui.edu
317-274-7722
Indiana University School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Electronic Health Information Leader Says Physician Practice Redesign is Vital Next Step Towards Safer, More Effective Care Delivery
2. Why do physicians order costly CTs? Ultrasound yields better diagnosis, safer, less costly
3. Study finds everolimus-eluting stent safer, more effective than paclitaxel-eluting stent
4. Toys Getting Safer, But Dangers Still Lurk: Report
5. Secrets of plant warfare underpin quest for safer, more secure global food supply
6. Low forms of cyclin E reduce breast cancer drugs effectiveness
7. Gastric Banding Most Effective for Obese Teens
8. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
9. China Cord Blood Corporation Warrant Registration Statement Declared Effective by SEC
10. Charging less for more effective treatments could reduce health care costs while improving health
11. Split-course palliative radiotherapy confirmed as effective treatment for advanced NSCLC
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
A safer, more effective morphine may be possible with Indiana University discovery
(Date:2/12/2016)... Aliso Viejo, CA (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... by Pixel Film Studios. The new cartoon style themes are great for showcasing pictures, ... with completely customized scene generators, titles like introductions, lower thirds, transitions and a beautiful ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... 11, 2016 , ... According to an article published February 1st ... dietary supplement, is being recalled due to the discovery that it contains dangerous adulterants. ... a single supplement on the market proven to help people safety lose excess weight, ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... 11, 2016 , ... Florida Hospital presents Heart Health Awareness night on Sunday ... at the Amalie Arena. The puck drops at 6:00pm, but fans will have the ... prior to the game. The MEGA Heart will be located on Ford Thunder Alley ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Hall ... been gearing up for their simultaneous grand openings in March. All seven practices ... that you’re probably wondering, is reversing diabetes possible? According to this 2011 CNN ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... clinical decision support technology, with highly adaptable algorithms, has been updated to help ... has signs and symptoms consistent with Zikas and a travel history to affected ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... ALEX , has taken Kickstarter by storm, crowdfunding over $60,000 – or 120% of its original funding ... be delivered to backers starting May of this year. ... ... ... Created by NAMU, a team of biomedical engineers out of South ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , February 11, 2016 Breast ... that the Asia-Pacific (APAC) breast cancer ... to $3.4 billion by 2021, at a Compound Annual Growth ... in Asia-Pacific Markets to 2021 - states that the ... experience considerable expansion from $1.9 billion in 2014 to $3.4 ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... Fla. , Feb. 11, 2016 PLAD, ... started out 2016 with sales exceeding company targets, are ... have received their trademark from the United States Patent ... Bobby Clark , Chief Executive Officer of PLAD, Inc.  ... of Pennsylvania with two new ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: