Navigation Links
A new way of looking at Prader-Willi Syndrome
Date:11/15/2012

An Australian study reveals that people with the rare genetic disorder known as Prader-Willi Syndrome may have an impaired autonomic nervous system. This discovery opens up a new way of looking at the insatiable appetite experienced by all sufferers, as well as their very high risk of cardiovascular disease.

The autonomic nervous system controls our inner organs, including our gut, heart, liver and blood vessels. It is a finely tuned, dynamic system, responding moment-by-moment to the body's needs.

Researchers from Sydney's Garvan Institute of Medical Research, including Drs Alexander Viardot and Lisa Sze, Professor Lesley Campbell and Louise Purtell, undertook meal studies, comparing 10 adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome with 11 healthy matched obese people and 9 healthy lean people.

Their findings, now published online in the international journal Clinical Endocrinology, showed that heart rate variability, an indicator of autonomic nervous system function, was not normal in people with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

In a healthy person, the time between one heartbeat and the next varies considerably during a meal because the autonomic nervous system is very actively regulating the body's response to food and blood flow.

In people with Prader-Willi Syndrome, the study found, heartbeats were far too regular after a meal. This allowed the researchers to infer autonomic nervous system impairment.

"This is the first study to show that the response of the autonomic nervous system to food intake is abnormal in Prader-Willi Syndrome," said endocrinologist Dr Alex Viardot, one of the principal investigators.

"A range of abnormalities we see in Prader-Willi patients could be linked to it including how the body secretes appetite suppressing gut hormones, and also controls appetite through the central nervous system."

"We believe the finding introduces a fresh perspective on the pathophysiology of this disease, potentially leading to alternative treatments in the future."

Study leader Professor Lesley Campbell agreed, emphasising the fact that the researchers matched obese people very closely with Prader-Willi patients in order to establish exactly what is intrinsic to Prader-Willi. "As a result of that close matching, we believe we are seeing the actual defect induced by the syndrome," she said.

"The autonomic nervous system is very hard to assess and previous Prader-Willi studies have tended to look at the grosser autonomic nervous functions, such as pupil function, which has its limitations."

"To measure a very finely regulated thing like heart rate is a sensitive and reproducible way of measuring autonomic nervous function. This is the benefit of our study it's a reliable test."


'/>"/>

Contact: Alison Heather
a.heather@garvan.org.au
61-292-958-128
Research Australia
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Looking for the anti-Alzheimers molecule -- A new approach to treating a devastating disease
2. Healthy-Looking Pigs at State Fair Found to Have Swine Flu
3. Looking to Lose Weight?
4. Why do older adults display more positive emotion? It might have to do with what they’re looking at
5. Scientists looking for noninvasive ways to detect lung cancer early
6. Feinstein announces submission of new drug application for diagnosing parkinsonian syndromes
7. Edison Pharmaceuticals announces initiation of EPI-743 Phase 2B Leigh Syndrome Clinical Trial
8. Statins have potential to treat an autoimmune clotting disorder called antiphospholipid syndrome
9. Genetic test results for Lynch syndrome improved with new computer program
10. Settings standards for research into Rett syndrome
11. Metabolic syndrome makes a difference in hormone therapy risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Joshua Rosenthal, PhD, ... healthcare companies can use newly released government data on populations and physicians to ... intervene and capture the value they create to succeed in new economic models ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... 2016 , ... According to research by the National Association ... to be certified or obtain continuing education. To increase patient awareness of the ... Mouth?” campaign to inform dentists and patients about the possible lack of skills ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... Texas (PRWEB) , ... February 07, 2016 , ... ... new MyDecision™ program. MyDecision™ empowers employers and organizations with the tools and information ... MyDecision™ combines three elements to cut the cost of providing employee healthcare benefits ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... , ... February 06, 2016 , ... US Sports Camps ... Conference (YUCC) . This event brings together top non-profit leaders, ultimate organizations, and coaches ... Girls Ultimate”. Valerio Iani, Bay Area Disc Program Director of Youth and Education, describes ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... February 06, 2016 , ... Research ... treatment helps to reduce the frequency and level of relapse. , ... Healthy Identity and Purpose,” will explore the critical tasks of the recovery phase ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... DUBLIN , Feb. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the "Label-Free ... Global Forecasts to 2020" report to ... has announced the addition of the ... - Global Forecasts to 2020" report ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Feb. 8, 2016  Dynatronics Corporation (NASDAQ: ... advanced-technology medical devices and rehabilitation equipment for the ... the Denver Broncos, football team for winning the ... Jr. , Chairman and Chief Executive Officer.  "The ... we look forward to enhancing their athletic achievements ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... 8, 2016 --> ... by Allied Market Research titled, "World Synthetic ... 2014-2020", estimates the world synthetic biology market to ... sequencing technology segment would continue to lead the ... segment, collectively, held around half of the market ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: