Navigation Links
A new breed: Highly productive chickens help raise Ugandans from poverty
Date:7/20/2011

In the fight to improve global health, alleviate hunger, raise living standards and empower women in the developing world, chickens have an important role to play.

Jagdev Sharma, a researcher at the Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute has been investigating the advantages of a more productive species of chicken for villagers in rural Uganda. He reports his findings this week at the American Veterinary Medical Association Meeting in Saint Louis, Missouri.

The star of this developing story is a type of chicken known as the Kuroiler. As Sharma notes, it has already shown enormous promise in lifting villagers out of the cycle of economic poverty and nutritional stress in some of the poorest regions:

"The success of the Kuroiler chicken in India, where it was first introduced, makes us hopeful for similar improvements in rural Africa, particularly, in Uganda, where our initial results show the Kuroiler significantly outperforming native chickens."

Kuroilers are hybrid chickens, well suited to resource-poor village environments. They have been genetically selected to provide both meat and eggs and are able to survive and thrive on agricultural and household waste, requiring no additional feed.

The birds were developed by Keggfarms, a company based in Gurgaon, India and known for its pioneering efforts to improve rural conditions and provide nutritional security through household poultry keeping. Kuroilers were distributed in India to over 1 million households.

Women in rural locales in Africa (as well as India) are often responsible for raising chickens, which supply meat and eggs, as well as providing a vital source of income. Sharma is hoping to duplicate the Indian success story with Kuroilers in Africa, thanks to collaboration between Arizona State University and the Government of Uganda.

Chickens and their eggs are a vital source of nutrition in Uganda, with about 33 million birds produced annually. Of these, the majorityaround 28.4 millionare village flocks, with the remaining 4.6 million coming from commercial sources.

Village chicken flocks typically consist of 5-20 chickens per family. As Sharma notes however, such flocks are often insufficient to meet the nutritional and economic needs of village families. Indigenous chickens have a mortality rate of 40-80 percent. Native hens only produce around 40 eggs per year, while roosters provide limited sources of meat, weighing on average 1.5-2.0 kg.

Sharma and his group explored the performance of indigenous chickens, comparing them with the newly introduced Kuroilers. The new chickens are similar to indigenous chickens in terms of their feather colors for camouflage, agility in escaping predators and resistance to disease. Kuroilers differ however in other important features, including their hatchability, adult weight and number of eggs produced.

For the study, 10 Kuroiler and 10 local chickens were distributed to each of 100 families in 5 districts of Uganda. As a control, 100 Kuroiler and 100 native chickens were also held in confinement at a facility in Entebbe. The Kuroiler eggs were sent from India while the local eggs were held in Entebbe for 6 days before setting. Kuroilers and native chickens were assessed for their survival, weight gain, egg production and acceptance by farmers.

The fertility and hatchability of Kuroiler eggs was significantly better than for native eggs, with 80 percent of Kuroilers successfully hatching compared with 47 percent of native eggs. Further, in four districts in Uganda where farmers received Kuroilers, the chickens showed a survival rate of 84%, comparable to that of indigenous birds. Body weight gain for Kuroilers was significantly higher as was their total body weight in adulthood3kg for male Kuroilers as opposed to 1.5-2.0 for native male chickens.

The most dramatic advantage of the Kuroilers however was their egg laying capacity, which outpaced native species in both village-scavenging settings and for chickens raised in confinement. Kuroilers delivered around 200 eggs annually compared with 40 for native species.

In summation; the study demonstrated that Kuroilers represent a 133 percent increase in meat production, and a 462 percent increase in egg production. These figures also point to a 341 percent increase in income for rural poultry farmersoften village housewivesan important stepping stone toward nutritional and economic security in this poor region.

Sharma is hopeful that government and private contributions to the successful Kuroiler project will significantly extend the reach of this initiative, improving village conditions in many other areas of Africa, where poverty and deprivation remain common.


'/>"/>

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. HPV infection highly prevalent among organ transplant recipients
2. Scientists identify a novel mechanism for evolution of highly aggressive cancers
3. Bariatric surgery highly cost-effective treatment for type 2 diabetes in the obese
4. New vaccine candidate shows strong potential to prevent highly contagious norovirus
5. Highly interactive training helps workers in dangerous jobs avoid deadly mistakes
6. Highly targeted radiation technique minimizes side effects of prostate cancer treatment
7. Help wanted: Highly cited researchers needed for high-ranking positions at research institutions
8. Lead poisoning highly prevalent among school-aged children in Uganda
9. New weapon against highly resistant microbes within grasp
10. Whole body MRI is highly accurate in the early detection of breast cancer metastases
11. Swedes think highly of the government -- but not of the royal family
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
A new breed: Highly productive chickens help raise Ugandans from poverty
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... Aimed at nurses and employees in the health care ... leaders in the nursing and health care industry. It also provides insight to the ... University. , As the nursing industry is coming out of one of the ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Despite last week’s media reports hinting at a ... to wait until March 2017 for an interest rate increase, according to Rajeev Dhawan ... Business. , “The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) dot charts are of interest to ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Cabot Corporation, Pfizer, and ... according to court documents and SEC filings. A jury has returned a ... American Optical Corporation, Case No. BC588866, Los Angeles County, California. The jury awarded ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... , ... May 26, 2016 , ... Connor Sports, ... basketball as a partner for the Tamika Catchings Legacy Tour that will ... industry leader in hardwood basketball surfaces in all forms and levels of the game, ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Cardiac arrhythmia is a common complication following ... survival, reports a team of UPMC researchers in the largest study of its ... Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, provide critical information that will hopefully lead to better ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... , Deutschland und GERMANTOWN, Maryland ... Zusammenarbeit mit Therawis bedient ... bei Brustkrebs   QIAGEN N.V. (NASDAQ: ... gab heute bekannt, eine Lizenz- und Entwicklungsvereinbarung mit ... Assays für die Onkologie eingegangen zu sein. Ein ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... May 25, 2016 As illustrated ... earlier this month, the numbers and momentum of cannabis ... climb into the billions, more research and development push ... Edition State of Legal Marijuana Markets Report  from from ... firm, much of the increase in sector is attributed ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... , May 25, 2016 ... H1 2016"market research report that provides an overview ... comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by ... administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest ... also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: