Navigation Links
A*STAR scientists identify potential drug target for inflammatory diseases including cancers
Date:11/21/2012

1. A*STAR scientists have identified the enzyme, telomerase, as a cause of chronic inflammation in human cancers. Chronic inflammation is now recognized as a key underlying cause for the development of many human cancers, autoimmune disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic diseases such as diabetes. This enzyme, which is known to be responsible for providing cancer cells the endless ability to divide, is now found to also jumpstart and maintain chronic inflammation in cancers.

2. In identifying this enzyme, inflammation can be prevented or reduced, and the common ailments can be alleviated. This discovery has considerable impact on healthcare because developing drugs to target telomerase can greatly reduce healthcare costs.

3. Currently, the annual costs and expenses associated with cancer and metabolic diseases such as diabetes amount to about $132 billion in the US alone . Although many safe and effective anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin are currently available on the market, these drugs sometimes have side effects because blocking inflammation is typically detrimental to normal physiology. Hence there exists a need for the development of cost-effective drugs that are targeted, so as to minimize side effects.

4. This collaborative research was conducted by scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) led by Assoc Prof Vinay Tergaonkar, A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and National University of Singapore. Other clinical collaborators include Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School. The research findings were published on Nov. 18, 2012, in the prestigious scientific journal, Nature Cell Biology.

5. The team identified that telomerase directly regulates the production of inflammatory molecules that are expressed by NF-kB, a known master regulator of chronic inflammation. These molecules are critical for inflammation and cancer progression. By inhibiting telomerase activity in primary cancer cells obtained from patient samples, the scientists found that levels of IL-6, an inflammatory molecule known to be a key driver of human cancers, was reduced in expression as well. This is an important breakthrough that shows how targeting telomerase with drugs could potentially reduce inflammation, and hence get rid of cancer cells.

6. Dr Tergaonkar said, "These findings provide a unifying explanation for a decade worth of observations from leading laboratories in the field which show that chronic inflammation and telomerase hyperactivity co-exist in over 90 percent of human cancers. What we show that these two activities are actually interdependent. They also may lead to potentially novel drugs that will target a range of human ailments with inflammation as an underlying cause, which range from arthritis to cancer."

7. Prof Hong Wan Jin, Executive Director of IMCB, said, "The discovery speaks for the exceptional power of identifying novel mechanisms that have translational potential, through close collaborations among scientists in different A*STAR institutes, as well as to bring together both basic and clinical research scientists in Singapore. I am confident that we can expect more discoveries like this from Dr Tergaonkar's team."


'/>"/>

Contact: Vithya Selvam
vithya_selvam@a-star.edu.sg
656-826-6291
Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. A*STAR scientists discover switch to boost anti-viral response to fight infectious diseases
2. Fruit flies light the way for A*STAR scientists to pinpoint genetic changes that spell cancer
3. Scientists solving the mystery of human consciousness
4. Scientists uncover multiple faces of deadly breast cancer
5. Scientists identify major source of cells defense against oxidative stress
6. Scientists tailor cell surface targeting system to hit organelle ZIP codes
7. Scientists rewrite rulebook on breast cancer in landmark global study
8. Warwick scientists uncover how checkpoint proteins bind chromosomes
9. NIH scientists link quickly spreading gene to Asian MRSA epidemic
10. Joslin scientists identify important mechanism that affects the aging process
11. Scripps Research scientists show how memory B cells stay in class to fight different infections
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/12/2016)... , ... February 12, 2016 ... ... today announced a new initiative—the Siemens Foundation-PATH Ingenuity Fellowships—to develop the advanced ... will recruit top students from U.S. universities who will draw from Siemens’ ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... ... Each year, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) offers a Combined Sections Meeting. ... Almost 10,000 physical therapists across the country are expected to attend this annual convention ... field and network with their colleagues. As in years past, HydroWorx is proud ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... The ThedaCare ... San Francisco General Hospital on April 5-7. The series is a multi-day, multi-workshop ... habits. The workshops cover a broad range of topics, including coaching skills, the ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... NC (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... AssureVest ... surrounding areas, is initiating a charity drive that will raise funds earmarked to purchase ... John C. Tayloe Elementary School. , “My school is in a low-income area and ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Young Asset ... celebrates the beginning of the latest charity campaign in their community enrichment program. ... Donations to this worthy cause are currently being accepted at: http://artexpressioninc.org/ . ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... LOUISVILLE, Ky. , Feb. 12, 2016 ... it has completed a $47.1 million Series ... investors Cormorant Asset Management, Hillhouse Capital Group ... investors Morningside Venture Investments, AJU IB Investment, ... will be used to further advance clinical ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016 Stem cells are ... characterized by self-renewal and the capacity to differentiate into ... new discovery, as the first mouse embryonic stem cells ... not until 1995 that the first culturing of embryonic ... cells were not produced until 2006 As a result ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016  Governor Andrew M. Cuomo ... create 1,400 jobs throughout Western New York ... with the SUNY Polytechnic Institute, includes a major expansion ... in Buffalo , as well as ... facility in Dunkirk . The combined ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: