Navigation Links
5,000 steps a day to avoid paying higher health insurance costs? When money talks, people walk

ANN ARBOR, Mich. It was a controversial move when a health insurer began requiring people who were obese to literally pay the price of not doing anything about their weight but it worked, a new study finds.

When people had to choose between paying up to 20 percent more for health insurance or exercising more, the majority of enrollees met fitness goals one step at a time via an Internet-tracked walking program, according to a joint study by the University of Michigan Health System and Stanford University.

Researchers evaluated a group of people insured by Blue Care Network who were enrolled in a pedometer-based program as a requirement to receive insurance discounts. After one year, nearly 97 percent of the enrollees had met or exceeded the average goal of 5,000 steps a day including the most resistant participants who disagreed with the financial incentives and found the program "coercive."

"There are ethical debates around the idea of forcing someone to be personally responsible for health care costs related to not exercising, but we expect to see more of these approaches to financially motivate healthier behaviors," says senior author Caroline R. Richardson, M.D., assistant professor in the U-M Department of Family Medicine, investigator with the VA Center for Clinical Management Research and member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

"Our evaluation of Blue Care's incentivized program showed a surprisingly high rate of people who enrolled in the Internet-mediated walking program and stuck with it even among those who were initially hostile to the idea. Wellness interventions like this clearly hold significant promise for encouraging physical activity among adults who are obese."

The new findings appear in Translational Behavioral Medicine.

Blue Care Network created a buzz when it implemented one of the largest-scaled financial incentive programs in the country by requiring adults who were obese and in the Healthy Blue Living program to enroll in a fitness program to qualify for lower out-of-pocket health care costs. Enrollees could choose between several programs, including Weight Watchers and WalkingSpree, which uses a digital pedometer to upload walking data on a wellness tracking web site.

For some families, the out-of-pocket cost of failing to meet the new criteria in one of the wellness programs was nearly $2,000 more per year. Those with medical conditions were exempt if they had waivers from their doctors.

Nearly half of the 12,102 enrollees who met criteria for a wellness program picked pedometer-based WalkingSpree, and the study's authors evaluated their success. The 6,548 participants were required to reach an average of 5,000 daily steps in each three month period, or 450,000 steps a quarter, to remain eligible for enhanced benefits. Just 3 percent failed to do so.

Among users who responded to a satisfaction survey about the program, a third were unhappy with the financial incentives because they felt the incentives were coercive. The remaining two-thirds of respondents, however, liked the program.

Authors note that policies under the Affordable Care Act are expected to expand the types of wellness programs offered by employers and insurance companies who ultimately save on health costs when employees and enrollees maintain healthier habits.

"Our findings suggest that incentivized wellness programs are acceptable to many individuals and that these programs encourage healthy behaviors," says lead author Donna Zulman, M.D., Instructor in the Division of General Medical Disciplines at Stanford University and research investigator at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System.

"Comprehensive evaluations are needed to determine whether participation in these programs translates to meaningful changes in health and costs of health care."


Contact: Beata Mostafavi
University of Michigan Health System

Related medicine news :

1. Clemson researcher awarded nearly $245,000 to study automation trust and dependence
2. New substances 15,000 times more effective in destroying chemical warfare agents
3. Scientists test 5,000 combinations of 100 existing cancer drugs to find more effective treatments
4. Kessler Foundation stroke expert receives $145,000 grant from Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey
5. No Gray Hairs Announces 25,000th Bottle Sold
6. d'Oliveira & Associates Help New Bedford Woman Receive $95,000 in Damages for Dog Bite Injury Case #:NB-11736
7. Is COBRA Right for You and Worth the $15,000 Annual Price Tag?
8. Third Cohort of NLN Jonas Scholars Pursue Doctoral Research in Nursing Education with $75,000 Grant
9. OC’s Top Doctor At Wellness Choice Center Hits 5,000 Patient Mark
10. Attleboro Attorneys Win Social Security Disability Claim for Attleboro Woman Awarded Over $25,000 In Back Due Benefits
11. Sugary Drinks Tied to 25,000 U.S. Deaths a Year
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... An inventor, from Hopkinsville, Ky., thought ... at home, so he invented the patent-pending ELECTRONIC M.D. , The ELECTRONIC M.D. ... doing so, it could help to prevent potential overdose situations. As a result, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... ... MPWH, the No.1 Herpes-only dating community in the world, revealed that over 50% of its ... 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 – or 67% of the population - ... estimates of HSV-1 infection . , "The data shocks us highly!" said Michelle Li, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Keeping in mind challenges ... health and wellness consultation, has collaborated with a leading web-based marketplace for extra-curricular ... experienced by parents and bring advice from parenting experts within their reach. As ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Indosoft Inc., developer and ... of Asterisk 11 LTS (Long Term Support) into its Q-Suite 5.10 product line. ... 5.10 up-to-date with a version of Asterisk that will receive not only security ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... workshops to discuss bioavailability and the need to integrate dose form selection in ... collaboration with OBN, the membership organization supporting and bringing together the UK’s emerging ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... 26, 2015 ... aanpak combineert immunotherapie met Bremachlorin-photodynamische therapie voor ... ) --> ... ) Uit ... Centrum (LUMC) blijkt ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 26, 2015 Research and Markets ( ... "2016 Future Horizons and Growth Strategies in ... Shares, Country Segment Forecasts, Competitive Intelligence, Emerging Opportunities" ... --> --> This new ... Japanese therapeutic drug monitoring market, including emerging tests, ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... Juntendo universitetssjukhus ser potential att använda SyMRI ... (MR-bilder) för patienter med multipel skleros ... forskningsavtal med SyntheticMR AB för att kunna ... på sjukhuset. Med SyMRI kan man generera ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: