Navigation Links
1 in 4 US HIV patients don't stay in care, Penn study shows
Date:3/6/2012

PHILADELPHIA Only about 75 percent of HIV/AIDS patients in the United States remain in care consistently, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published online this week in AIDS. The study of patients across the United States is the first to provide a comprehensive national estimate of HIV care retention and information about patients who are most likely to continue their treatment over time.

"Helping patients with HIV stay in care is a key way to reduce their chances of getting sick from their disease and prevent the spread of HIV in the community. Our findings show that too many patients are falling through the cracks," says the study's lead author, Baligh R. Yehia, MD, a fellow in the division of Infectious Disease and the Health Policy Research Program at Penn Medicine. "The benefits of keeping patients in care are clear both for patients and the community at large, and it may even result in decreased health care costs by preventing unnecessary hospitalization for an acute illness."

The researchers studied 17,425 adult patients cared for at 12 clinics within the HIV Research Network, a consortium that cares for HIV-infected patients across the nation, between 2001 and 2008. Just 42 percent of patients studied had what researchers defined as "no gap" in treatment intervals of no more than six months in between outpatient visits over the timeframe studied, while 31 percent had one or more seven- to 12-month gaps in care. Twenty-eight percent appeared to have gone without care for more than a year on one or more occasions. Since there is no gold standard on the best way to measure retention in care, the team used three different measures of retention to examine each patient's visit record.

Women, white patients, older patients, male patients who were infected via sex with men, and patients who began treatment on Medicare (compared to those on private insurance) were all more likely to remain in care more consistently. Retention was also greater among patients whose CD4 counts the measure of how advanced the disease is were very low, at the point associated with AIDS, when they entered care.

The team suggests that their findings may help guide clinicians in assessing which patients are more likely to follow their prescribed visit schedule, and develop intervention strategies to improve their chances of adhering to their care. "Clinicians need to know what barriers to screen for, so our findings help to better define groups of patients who may require extra help to stay on track," says the study's senior author and Yehia's mentor, Kelly Gebo, MD, an associate professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Housing, transportation and financial problems, substance abuse and mental illness can all be contributors to problems with care retention, and patients who don't have symptoms may not believe they're "sick" enough to require regular visits with their providers.

Yehia also notes that a standardized criteria for determining the appropriate time between visits is needed, since patients who are at various stages in their disease, have other health conditions or certain social circumstances may require unique plans for care thus making it hard to assess aggregate retention across the entire HIV population. And since patients may switch doctors, move frequently, go to jail or become institutionalized and still receive care during those times, the research team suggests additional studies that track patients across those circumstances, such as research involving data from insurance records.

Questions also remain about how HIV treatment retention may change as time passes during what has become, for many, a chronic condition spanning decades of their lives.

"It's possible that as time goes by, some patients may become more regular users of care, while others may become complacent and skip appointments," Yehia says. "We need to better pinpoint times when certain patients may be less likely to remain in treatment and find ways to ensure their continued care."


'/>"/>

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. ICU Patients at Risk for Rare Heart Rhythm Problem
2. Young patients with chronic illnesses find relief in acupuncture
3. For Some Breast Cancer Patients, Shorter Radiation Works Well
4. New Study Uses Adult Stem Cells in Effort to Save Limbs of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease
5. Patients with Lethal Lung Disease Finally Receive Recognition by Social Security Administration
6. Behavioral therapy improves sleep and lives of patients with pain
7. Protecting patients: Study shows that Johns Hopkins flu vaccination rates twice national average
8. MSU researcher linking breast cancer patients with alternative therapies
9. New American Heart Association Survey Finds Heart Disease and Stroke Patients Face Significant Barriers in Obtaining Quality, Affordable Care
10. Fishy Smell May Keep Patients From Diabetes Drug
11. AGA offers new recommendations for CRC surveillance for certain patients with IBD
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... N.Y (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Lori ... became a member of ElderCounsel, a national organization of elder law and special needs ... changing laws and rules. It also provides a forum to network with elder law ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Ellevate Network, the leading network for professional ... action towards gender equality at their inaugural Summit in New York City in June. ... a social audience of over 3 million. To watch the Mobilize Women video, ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... Coveros, a leader in agile coaching ... contract by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The Enterprise Agile ... of Agile methodologies in a consistent and high value manner across CMS programs. ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... CitiDent and ... apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 million Americans ... frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to about 75 ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) will present the 2017 Morris F. ... AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s Annual Symposium is taking place ... the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award is presented to an individual whose ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/27/2017)... NEW YORK , Sept. 27, 2017  DarioHealth Corp. (NASDAQ: ... data solutions, today announced that its MyDario product is expected to appear ... listings for when The Dr. Oz Show airs in your area: ... The nine-time Emmy award-winning, The ... ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... ROCKVILLE, Md. , Sept. 22, 2017  As ... by Republican Senators Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and ... Kalorama Information notes that the medical device industry is ... the medical device tax, the 2.3% excise tax on ... Act.  But they also want covered patients, increased visits ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... KALAMAZOO, Mich. , Sept. 18, 2017  PMD ... OptiMed Specialty Pharmacy of Kalamazoo, Mich. ... strategic hub service that expedites and streamlines patient and ... Spiro PD 2.0, and wellness management services.  ... medical device used to measure lung function for a ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: