Navigation Links
Troubled Teens Spotted in Routine School Screenings: Study
Date:8/29/2011

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Routine high school mental-health screenings can successfully identify high-risk students and help them receive needed care, according to a new study.

Screenings conducted over the course of five years at six suburban public high schools in Wisconsin revealed that roughly 75 percent of the students considered at high risk for mental health issues were not being treated.

The researchers, from the TeenScreen National Center for Mental Health Checkups at Columbia University, said their findings should lead to more teens getting help for untreated mental illnesses, which can lead to school failure, drug or alcohol abuse, violence or suicide.

"The value of school-based screening is reinforced by this study," said Leslie McGuire, TeenScreen's deputy executive director, in a Columbia news release. Screening in adolescence is important because 50 percent of long-term mental health disorders start by age 14, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

Students participating in the study completed a computerized questionnaire intended to detect depression, anxiety and other mental health problems.

Following the screening, the students discussed their responses in a one-on-one meeting. Those with positive scores on the questionnaire were evaluated by a specially trained clinician and referred for further counseling if needed.

The study, published in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, showed that of those students identified as high-risk, 76 percent had at least one visit with a mental health professional within 90 days after the school-based screening. Fifty-six percent of those deemed high-risk received "minimally adequate" treatment consisting of three or more sessions, the researchers said.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics provides more information on teen mental health.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: Columbia University, news release, Aug. 29, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Resilience Gene May Save Kids in Troubled Families
2. Good Child Care May Help Make Up for Troubled Homes
3. Bartenders may have role in assisting troubled war veterans
4. Majority of U.S. Adults Had Troubled Childhoods: CDC
5. One Troubled Adult Child a Drag on Parents Mental Health
6. Experimental obesity drug avoids brain effects that troubled predecessors
7. New Hope for the Sleepless: RealSleep Uses Sound To Help Troubled Sleepers Go To Sleep Faster and Stay Asleep Longer
8. New Website Provides Counselors with Instant Help for Troubled Kids
9. Grades May Suffer When Teens Get Bullied
10. Happy Teens Usually Crime-Free Teens, Study Finds
11. Telephone trumps social media when communicating with teens about research
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
 Troubled Teens  Spotted in Routine School Screenings: Study
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... International Protein, a company based out of Australia that focuses ... January ECRM trade show in Hilton Head, SC. , International Protein was founded ... a line of products that would elevate her fitness regime. At this ECRM trade ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... ... sugar-free alternative VW+ 002. The drinks have been produced in collaboration with Zlatan ... perform during your workout. , After a successful launch in Sweden last year, ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 20, 2017 , ... “Code Word: Chocolate Biscuit”: a biographical account following a man who went ... creation of published author, Marlyn Ivey, born in Lynn Haven, Florida and at the age ... at 19 years of age, he joined the Navy and got married right out of ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... in Suffolk”: a story of love, secrets, and mystery. “Christmas in Suffolk” is ... works in a daycare and looks for inspiration in the local coffee shop as ... Seymour’s new book is an adventure of love and secrets. , After ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... “The Land of More and More”: a brilliant story for children and adults ... and achievable answer. “The Land of More and More” is the creation of published ... Indiana where he works with the children’s ministry department. , Michael says that ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... , Jan. 19, 2017 ViewRay, Inc. ... a federal institution supporting research in Germany ... and patient treatments at the University Clinic Heidelberg as ... The MRIdian Linac program will be headed by ... also heads radiation oncology at the German Cancer Research ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 19, 2017   Science Exchange , the leading ... that the first five replication studies from the ... published in eLife today. Despite intense scrutiny around ... practical evaluation of reproducibility rates that may identify ... other assessments of reproducibility, the results of this ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... , January 19, 2017 ... Option to Address Motor Symptoms and Motor Complications ... ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151014/276718LOGO) ... , European Neurological Review,2016;11(Suppl. 2): 2-15, http://www.touchneurology.com/articles/safinamide-new-therapeutic-option-address-motor-symptoms-and-motor-complications-mid-late ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: