Navigation Links
Sleepless Nights Plague America
Date:3/8/2010

People of all races say lack of shuteye affects their work, even sex lives

MONDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News)-- Americans of all races toss and turn in bed each night, and sleeplessness is affecting their jobs, social lives and even their sexual habits, the latest poll on U.S. sleep habits finds.

"Everybody is sleeping less; we do live in a nation of sleepy people," said Dr. Jose Loredo, a professor of medicine and director of the Sleep Medicine Center at the University of California, San Diego, and a member of the committee that conducted the National Sleep Foundation poll, titled 2010 Sleep in America.

The survey of 1,007 adults across the country found that people sleep almost two hours less than they did 40 years ago. "You need about 8.5 hours of sleep a night," he added.

"Sleep duration is a very important variable in health, especially cardiovascular health," Loredo said. "There is a strong association of sleeping less and hypertension, sleeping less and heart attacks, sleeping less and obesity," he said.

Many Americans seemingly know this, as more than three-quarters surveyed acknowledged that too little shuteye can have serious health consequences.

Too little sleep also takes a toll on daily living, with up to 24 percent saying they have missed work or social engagements because they were too tired. And among married people or couples living together, as many as 26 percent said that they were too tired to have frequent sex.

For the first time, the annual report also identifies differences in sleep habits among blacks, whites and Hispanics. These include:

  • Blacks are most likely to watch TV (75 percent) or pray (71 percent) in the hour before going to bed.
  • Blacks spend more time in bed without going to sleep (54 minutes during the week, 71 minutes on weekends).
  • Nightly lovemaking is most common among blacks and Hispanics. Ten percent of blacks and Hispanics report having sex every night, compared with 1 percent of Asians and 4 percent of whites.
  • Doing job-related work before bed is more common among blacks and Asians than whites or Hispanics.
  • More blacks and Hispanics say they lose sleep over financial worries (12 and 11 percent) than whites (6 percent) or Asians (1 percent).
  • Blacks say they need less sleep, and get 38 minutes less sleep than whites and 34 minutes less than Asians.
  • Fewer Asians (9 percent) say they never or rarely get a good night's sleep than whites (20 percent), blacks (18 percent) and Hispanics (14 percent).
  • Fewer Asians (52 percent) watch TV before going to bed than whites (64 percent), blacks (75 percent) or Hispanics (72 percent), but Asians are most likely to use the Internet every night.
  • Asians report getting the best sleep and infrequently use sleeping pills.
  • Whites are more likely to use over-the-counter sleep aids.
  • Blacks are most likely to use prescription sleeping pills.
  • Blacks have the highest rate of sleep apnea, a common but potentially serious sleep disorder.

What accounts for these ethnic differences isn't clear, Loredo said. "The differences could be cultural or the environment," he said.

Television keeps many people awake, Loredo noted. As does the recession.

Dr. Bruce A. Nolan, an associate professor of clinical neurology, psychiatry and behavioral sciences and medical director of the Sleep Disorders Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, said the economic crisis is a common cause of sleeplessness.

"Many people are experiencing more difficulty with sleep related to economic, social and personal circumstances," he said. "It really says that bad days lead to bad nights."

But efforts to improve sleep habits will pay off, Nolan said. "Better quality of sleep gives better quality of life and also gives better performance during the daytime," he said. That helps people to feel better and function better, he said.

The National Sleep Foundation has some tips for getting a good night's sleep:

  • Go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day.
  • Use the bedroom only for sleeping.
  • Consider taking the TV out of the bedroom.
  • Have a relaxing bedtime ritual, like a warm bath or listening to soft music.
  • Keep your sleep environment quiet, dark and cool with comfortable bedding.
  • Reduce caffeine, nicotine and alcohol.
  • Keep your worries for daytime.
  • If you can't sleep, go to another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired.
  • Exercise regularly, but not close to bedtime.

More information

For more information on sleep, visit the National Sleep Foundation.



SOURCES: Jose Loredo, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine, medical director, Sleep Medicine Center, University of California, San Diego; Bruce A. Nolan, M.D., associate professor of clinical neurology, psychiatry and behavioral sciences, medical director, Sleep Disorders Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; March 8, 2010, National Sleep Foundation, report, 2010 Sleep in America


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Sleep More, Lose Weight – Sleeplessness Linked to Obesity
2. BayCare Health System Sleep Disorder Centers Offer Help for Sleepless Nights
3. Sleeplessness a Weighty Matter
4. Tired of Sleepless Nights?
5. Tired? Sleepless? ... New Sleep Program Good Night, Sleep Right(TM) Launches in April 2009
6. Sleepless in Botswana
7. With the Economy Down, Sleeplessness Is Up
8. 26 percent of sleepless children become overweight
9. Stop Dads Sleepless Nights - and the Sniffles - With the Snoring Center
10. Sleepless Nights Make for Grumpier Brains
11. Chronic Reflux Often Leads to Sleepless Nights
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the ... to iHire in recognition of their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The ... Health & Wellness Symposium at the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World Sickle Cell Observance Day. In ... benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center of Marne, Michigan, has issued ... Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the red blood cells, which can ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Dr. Amanda Cheng, an orthodontist ... has extensive experience with all areas of orthodontics, including robotic Suresmile technology, ... , Micro-osteoperforation is a revolutionary adjunct to orthodontic treatment. It can be used ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... EB Medicine presented ... in Emergency Medicine conference in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL. The awards honor the ... Emergency Medicine Practice and Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice. , “With this award, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... National recruitment firm Slone Partners is pleased to announce ... experience, as Vice President of North American Capital Sales at HTG Molecular . ... sales team in the commercialization of the HTG EdgeSeq system and associated reagents in ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Research and Markets ... Medical Market Analysis 2016 - Forecast to 2022" report ... The report contains up to date financial data derived from ... of major trends with potential impact on the market during ... market segmentation which comprises of sub markets, regional and country ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... INDIANAPOLIS , June 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Diabetes Tomorrow,s Leaders Scholarship is any indication, the future ... today online at www.diabetesscholars.org by the Diabetes ... stand in the way of academic and community service ... scholarship program since 2012, and continues to advocate for ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Research ... "Surgical Procedure Volumes: Global Analysis (United States, China, Japan, ... report to their offering. ... tool for healthcare business planners, provides surgical procedure volume ... surgery trends with an in-depth analysis of growth drivers ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: