Navigation Links
University of Colorado Cancer Center Review Shows Long-term Side-effects of New, Targeted Therapies in Pediatric Cancer Patients
Date:2/7/2013

Aurora, COLO (PRWEB) February 07, 2013

A University of Colorado Cancer Center review published this week in the journal Lancet Oncology describes possible long-term side-effects of new, targeted therapies in pediatric cancer patients: what we don’t know may hurt us.

“As pediatricians who treat kids with cancer, we expect the side-effects of traditional chemotherapies: low white blood count, infections, even long-term heart trouble or infertility. But there’s the impression that these new, molecularly targeted agents are much less toxic. That may be true, especially in adult patients, but until we have more information about the long-term effects of these therapies in children, we need to be careful about how and when we prescribe them,” says Chris Porter, MD, CU Cancer Center investigator and assistant professor of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Already we know that molecularly targeted therapies may stunt the growth of pediatric patients, delay puberty or speed the onset of diabetes. And researchers are just now starting to ask about additional, sometimes unforeseen side-effects, potentially including more subtle issues such as neurocognitive, balance and motor defects.

“The growth of cancer cells isn’t that different than the growth of a 7-pound baby into a 210-pound teenage linebacker. Now, you shut down these growth pathways in an adult and it might not be a big deal, but you shut down these same pathways at a critical time in childhood development and you can have real problems,” says Lia Gore, MD, CU Cancer Center investigator and associate professor of Pediatrics and Medical Oncology at the CU School of Medicine.

The practical problem is this: FDA approval of many of these drugs for adult use allows physicians to prescribe the same drugs for pediatric use. Many are pills – orally administered, outpatient treatments that make it difficult to recognize and track possible side-effects even in the short-term, let alone 10, 15 or 60 years later.

“The message I really want to convey is that our way of treating pediatric cancer has changed entirely in some diseases, and in some it’s meant huge progress. A number of us have patients who have literally been cured by these new drugs. There are a lot of really cool therapies out there, but the issue is using them safely. With increased survival, we need to cure kids for 60-70 years. The question is how do we best treat these kids, knowing that cancer remains the enemy but you also don’t want to induce complications that negatively affect the rest of their lives,” Gore says.

“Personally, one of the most important things when choosing how to treat pediatric patients is to know what I don’t know – to acknowledge gaps in knowledge. Then as a researcher, we try to fill these gaps so that we can prescribe knowing the balance of risk and reward for these treatments,” Porter says.

For now and until these questions are answered, the researchers recommend using molecularly targeted therapies with pediatric patients only in the context of a clinical trial. To Gore, Porter and co-author James DeGregori, PhD, the framework of a clinical trial provides the oversight needed for the rational prescription of these drugs in pediatric patients – along with follow-up that includes more definite monitoring of side-effects than what Gore describes as “random use.”

“One of the reasons we wrote this paper is that we don’t understand the major risks, or even what the major risks might be,” Porter says. “These targeted agents may affect the process of development in ways we can’t predict.”

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/2/prweb10409854.htm.


'/>"/>
Source: PRWeb
Copyright©2012 Vocus, Inc.
All rights reserved

Related biology technology :

1. Elsevier and Kanazawa University in Japan Collaborate to Map Universitys Research Performance
2. Two University of Colorado Cancer Center Studies Show that Silibinin, Found in Milk Thistle, Protects Against UV-Induced Skin Cancer
3. WaferGens MyDesign Open Platform Facilitates Rapid Development of a Proprietary Prostate Cancer Diagnostic Panel in the Lab of Dr. Arul Chinnaiyan at the University of Michigan Cancer Center
4. NextBio Teams With Emory University and the Aflac Cancer Center to Improve Outcomes for Children with Medulloblastoma
5. Notre Dame to be part of $194 million university research center network
6. University of Minnesota awarded $28 million grant to lead microelectronics development
7. Krishagni Enables University of New South Wales (Australia) to Adopt caTissue Plus
8. University of Colorado Cancer Center Study Finds That Body's Ibuprofen, SPARC, Reduces Inflammation and Thus Bladder Cancer Development and Metastasis
9. Rice University discovers that graphene oxide soaks up radioactive waste
10. Carin Grings remains identified by researchers at Uppsala University
11. Nanonex Delivered Advanced Nanoimprint Tool NX-B200 to Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/11/2017)... and LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. , Oct. ... Cancer Research, London (ICR) and University ... SKY92, SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify patients with multiple myeloma ... MUK nine . The University of Leeds ... partly funded by Myeloma UK, and ICR will perform the ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 2017 , ... San Diego-based team building and cooking events company, Lajollacooks4u, has ... The bold new look is part of a transformation to increase awareness, appeal to ... period. , It will also expand its service offering from its signature gourmet cooking ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... 10, 2017 International research firm Parks Associates announced ... at the TMA 2017 Annual Meeting , October 11 in ... residential home security market and how smart safety and security products impact ... Parks Associates: Smart Home ... "The residential security market has ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... DIEGO , Oct. 9, 2017  BioTech ... biological mechanism by which its ProCell stem cell ... critical limb ischemia.  The Company, demonstrated that treatment ... amount of limbs saved as compared to standard ... the molecule HGF resulted in reduction of therapeutic ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 The ... Hardware (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, ... Region - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, ... 2016 and is projected to reach USD 75.64 Billion ... and 2022. The base year considered for the study ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... 24, 2017 The Controller General of Immigration from ... Abdulla Algeen have received the prestigious international IAIR Award for the ... Continue Reading ... ... Controller Abdulla Algeen (small picture on the right) have received the IAIR ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing Market by Technology (Touch-based ... to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to be worth USD ... 2022. Continue Reading ... ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):