Navigation Links
Sensitive detection method may help impede illicit nuclear trafficking
Date:7/10/2014

WASHINGTON D.C., April 15, 2014 -- According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) the greatest danger to nuclear security comes from terrorists acquiring sufficient quantities of plutonium or highly enriched uranium (HEU) to construct a crude nuclear explosive device. The IAEA also notes that most cases of illicit nuclear trafficking have involved gram-level quantities, which can be challenging to detect with most inspection methods.

According to a new study appearing this week in the Journal of Applied Physics, coupling commercially available spectral X-ray detectors with a specialized algorithm can improve the detection of uranium and plutonium in small, layered objects such as baggage. This approach enhances the detection powers of X-ray imaging and may provide a new tool to impede nuclear trafficking.

The study was conducted by a joint research team from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) and the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

"We first had to develop a computational model for how X-rays move through materials and how they are detected so that we could predict what an image will look like once the radiation passed through an object," said UT's Mark Deinert, one of the authors on the paper. "With that in hand, we applied an 'inverse algorithm,' varying the composition of the object until the predicted image matched the measured one. We also gave our algorithm additional details about density and other factorsa process called 'regularization' to adaptively enhance its ability to discriminate materials."

The new system, Deinert said, expands upon techniques originally developed for medical applications such as discerning between bone and iodine contrast agent in an X-ray image. "We wanted to show that spectrally sensitive detectors can be used to discriminate plutonium and other high-atomic-number elements from multiple layers of other materials using a single-view radiograph," said Andrew Gilbert, the lead author on the paper and a doctoral student of Deinert's working at PNNL. "In simulated radiographs, we were able to detect the presence of plutonium with a mass resolution per unit area of at least 0.07 gram/centimeter squared; in other words, we can locate a sample of plutonium with a thickness of only 0.036 millimeters."

Now that the inverse algorithm method has been shown to help X-rays detect nuclear materials in luggage and other small objects, Deinert said that his team will next expand the concept to improve detection on a larger scale. "We plan to apply the algorithm to high-energy X-ray systems that could be used for verification of arms-reduction treaties," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology technology :

1. Ultra-sensitive force sensing with a levitating nanoparticle
2. Eagle Biosciences Introduces Highly Sensitive Calprotectin ELISA Assay Kit
3. Adult Acne Treatment, Probiotic Action Shares New Insight on Why Men’s Skin is More Sensitive to Acne and How to Fight the Skin Condition with Supplements
4. A sensitive, affordable sensor to detect tiny amounts of CO2
5. Cost-Effective Approaches to Quality Distribution and Logistics for Temperature Sensitive Products
6. Researchers create method for more sensitive electrochemical sensors
7. Adaptive Biotechnologies launches clonoSEQ, a more sensitive, accurate assay to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) in blood-based cancers.
8. New silk technology preserves heat-sensitive drugs for months without refrigeration
9. New magnetic-field-sensitive alloy could find use in novel micromechanical devices
10. Menon Biosensors Demonstrates Industry Leading Sensitivity Levels for Detection of Tuberculosis and Clostridium difficile
11. Annai Systems to Support International Challenge to Improve the Detection of Cancer Mutations
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Sensitive detection method may help impede illicit nuclear trafficking
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... ... PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in existing third-party MRI ... testing novel treatments in small animal subjects. Simultaneous PET/MRI imaging offers a solution ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... ANGELES, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... April 27, 2016 ... ... Angeles office of Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP as an associate in the ... prosecuting U.S. and international electrical, mechanical and electromechanical patent applications. He has an ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 26, 2016 , ... This unique ... Scottsdale and will offer attendees an opportunity to get the lowdown on female fertility ... Over cocktails and appetizers, Dr. Jesse Hade, of Boston IVF - The Arizona Center, ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... , ... April 26, 2016 , ... ... announced the opening of its first round of pre-proposal competition for scientific grants. ... organization seeks to identify ideas with the highest potential to replace paradigms that ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:4/26/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... the  "Global Multi-modal Biometrics Market 2016-2020"  report to ... ) , The analysts forecast the ... CAGR of 15.49% during the period 2016-2020.  ... number of sectors such as the healthcare, BFSI, ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... Israel , April 14, 2016 ... Authentication and Malware Detection, today announced the appointment of ... assumed the new role. Goldwerger,s leadership appointment ... on the heels of the deployment of its platform ... BioCatch,s behavioral biometric technology, which discerns unique cognitive and ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... 29, 2016 LegacyXChange, Inc. (OTC: ... and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased to announce our successful ... a variety of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures against ... collectibles from athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured of ... DNA. Bill Bollander , CEO states, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):