Navigation Links
Rutgers researchers identify materials that may deliver more 'bounce'
Date:3/9/2011

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. Rutgers researchers have identified a class of high-strength metal alloys that show potential to make springs, sensors and switches smaller and more responsive.

The alloys could be used in springier blood vessel stents, sensitive microphones, powerful loudspeakers, and components that boost the performance of medical imaging equipment, security systems and clean-burning gasoline and diesel engines.

While these nanostructured metal alloys are not new they are used in turbine blades and other parts demanding strength under extreme conditions the Rutgers researchers are pioneers at investigating these new properties.

"We have been doing theoretical studies on these materials, and our computer modeling suggests they will be super-responsive," said Armen Khachaturyan, professor of Materials Science and Engineering in the Rutgers School of Engineering. He and postdoctoral researcher Weifeng Rao believe these materials can be a hundred times more responsive than today's materials in the same applications.

Writing in the March 11 issue of the journal Physical Review Letters, the researchers describe how this class of metals with embedded nanoparticles can be highly elastic, or "springy," and can convert electrical and magnetic energy into movement or vice-versa. Materials that exhibit these properties are known among scientists and engineers as "functional" materials.

One class of functional materials generates an electrical voltage when the material is bent or compressed. Conversely, when the material is exposed to an electric field, it will deform. Known as piezoelectric materials, they are used in ultrasound instruments; audio components such as microphones, speakers and even venerable record players; autofocus motors in some camera lenses; spray nozzles in inkjet printer cartridges; and several types of electronic components.

In another class of functional materials, changes in magnetic fields deform the material and vice-versa. These magnetorestrictive materials have been used in naval sonar systems, pumps, precision optical equipment, medical and industrial ultrasonic devices, and vibration and noise control systems.

The materials that Khachaturyan and Rao are investigating are technically known as "decomposed two-phase nanostructured alloys." They form by cooling metals that were exposed to high temperatures at which the nanosized particles of one crystal structure, or phase, are embedded into another type of phase. The resulting structure makes it possible to deform the metal under an applied stress while allowing the metal to snap back into place when the stress is removed.

These nanostructured alloys might be more effective than traditional metals in applications such blood vessel stents, which have to be flexible but can't lose their "springiness." In the piezoelectric and magnetorestrictive components, the alloy's potential to snap back into shape after deforming a property known as non-hysteresis could improve energy efficiency over traditional materials that require energy input to restore their original shapes.

In addition to potentially showing responses far greater than traditional materials, the new materials may be tunable; that is, they may exhibit smaller or larger shape changes and output force based on varying mechanical, electrical or magnetic input and the material processing.

The researchers hope to test the results of their computer simulations on actual metals in the near future.


'/>"/>

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ur.rutgers.edu
732-932-7084 x616
Rutgers University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology technology :

1. Rutgers discovery paves way for development of efficient, inexpensive plastic solar cells
2. Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository Adopts BioLife Solutions CryoStor(TM) as Standard Biopreservation Media
3. Researchers use genomics to investigate TB outbreak
4. Quantum hot potato: NIST researchers entice 2 atoms to swap smallest energy units
5. Researchers get a grip on nervous systems receptors
6. Researchers at Harvard and MITRE produce worlds first programmable nanoprocessor
7. Size of airborne flu virus impacts risk, Virginia Tech researchers say
8. What a ride! Researchers take molecules for a spin
9. Practice Fusion Invites Health Researchers to Analyze This! Contest on Windows Azure
10. Columbia University researchers use nanoscale transistors to study single-molecule interactions
11. Researchers visualize herpes virus tactical maneuver
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Rutgers researchers identify materials that may deliver more 'bounce'
(Date:1/19/2017)... Bethesda, MD (PRWEB) , ... January 18, 2017 ... ... for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to update its Data Sharing Policy. ... a “scoreable” element of grant applications subject to the existing policy. AMIA recommended ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... DaVita Clinical ... spectrum of drug and device development, and Prism Clinical Research , a ... today announced Verified Clinical Trials (VCT) has been selected by both ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... N.Y. , Jan. 18, 2017 Acupath ... services, announces the formation of an Executive Committee that ... and beyond. John Cucci , a ... promoted from Director of Business Development to Chief ... 2015, Mr. Cucci served in senior sales leadership roles ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , January 18, 2017 According to a new ... Diagnosis, Neuroscience, Cytology, Infectious Disease), & End User (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratories, Academic and ... expected to reach USD 739.9 Million by 2021 from USD 557.1 Million in ... Reading ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:1/12/2017)... NEW YORK , Jan. 12, 2017  New research ... around the office of the future.  1,000 participants were simply ... last three months which we may consider standard issue.  Insights ... office of 2017 were also gathered from futurists and industry ... and Dr. James Canton .  Some ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... 11, 2017  Michael Johnson, co-founder of Visikol Inc. a company ... has been named to the elite "Forbes 30 Under 30" list ... 600 people in 20 fields nationwide to be recognized as a ... applicants were selected. ... He is currently a PhD candidate at Rutgers University. ...
(Date:1/6/2017)...  Delta ID Inc., a leader in consumer-grade iris ... at CES® 2017. Delta ID has collaborated with Gentex ... use of iris scanning as a secure, reliable and ... a car, and as a way to elevate the ... Delta ID and Gentex will demonstrate (booth #7326 LVCC) ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):