Navigation Links
Rice builds nanotube photodetector

HOUSTON (Feb. 27, 2013) Researchers at Rice University and Sandia National Laboratories have made a nanotube-based photodetector that gathers light in and beyond visible wavelengths. It promises to make possible a unique set of optoelectronic devices, solar cells and perhaps even specialized cameras.

A traditional camera is a light detector that captures a record, in chemicals, of what it sees. Modern digital cameras replaced film with semiconductor-based detectors.

But the Rice detector, the focus of a paper that appeared today in the online Nature journal Scientific Reports, is based on extra-long carbon nanotubes. At 300 micrometers, the nanotubes are still only about 100th of an inch long, but each tube is thousands of times longer than it is wide.

That boots the broadband detector into what Rice physicist Junichiro Kono considers a macroscopic device, easily attached to electrodes for testing. The nanotubes are grown as a very thin "carpet" by the lab of Rice chemist Robert Hauge and pressed horizontally to turn them into a thin sheet of hundreds of thousands of well-aligned tubes.

They're all the same length, Kono said, but the nanotubes have different widths and are a mix of conductors and semiconductors, each of which is sensitive to different wavelengths of light. "Earlier devices were either a single nanotube, which are sensitive to only limited wavelengths," he said. "Or they were random networks of nanotubes that worked, but it was very difficult to understand why."

"Our device combines the two techniques," said Sbastien Nanot, a former postdoctoral researcher in Kono's group and first author of the paper. "It's simple in the sense that each nanotube is connected to both electrodes, like in the single-nanotube experiments. But we have many nanotubes, which gives us the quality of a macroscopic device."

With so many nanotubes of so many types, the array can detect light from the infrared (IR) to the ultraviolet, and all the visible wavelengths in between. That it can absorb light across the spectrum should make the detector of great interest for solar energy, and its IR capabilities may make it suitable for military imaging applications, Kono said. "In the visible range, there are many good detectors already," he said. "But in the IR, only low-temperature detectors exist and they are not convenient for military purposes. Our detector works at room temperature and doesn't need to operate in a special vacuum."

The detector is also sensitive to polarized light and absorbs light that hits it parallel to the nanotubes, but not if the device is turned 90 degrees.

The work is the first successful outcome of a collaboration between Rice and Sandia under Sandia's National Institute for Nano Engineering program funded by the Department of Energy. Franois Lonard's group at Sandia developed a novel theoretical model that correctly and quantitatively explained all characteristics of the nanotube photodetector. "Understanding the fundamental principles that govern these photodetectors is important to optimize their design and performance," Lonard said.

Kono expects many more papers to spring from the collaboration. The initial device, according to Lonard, merely demonstrates the potential for nanotube photodetectors. They plan to build new configurations that extend their range to the terahertz and to test their abilities as imaging devices. "There is potential here to make real and useful devices from this fundamental research," Kono said.

Contact: David Ruth
Rice University

Related biology technology :

1. UK nanodevice builds electricity from tiny pieces
2. NISTs nanotubes on a chip may simplify optical power measurements
3. James bond: A graphene/nanotube hybrid
4. Cloning could make structurally pure nanotubes for nanoelectronics
5. USC scientists clone carbon nanotubes to unlock their potential for use in electronics
6. Low-resistance connections facilitate multi-walled carbon nanotubes for interconnects
7. Strengthening fragile forests of carbon nanotubes for new MEMS applications
8. NRL demonstrates high durability of nanotube transistors to the harsh space environment
9. In nanotube growth, errors are not an option
10. Stanford engineers perfecting carbon nanotubes for highly energy-efficient computing
11. Unzipped carbon nanotubes could help energize fuel cells and batteries, Stanford scientists say
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Rice builds nanotube photodetector
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015 According to two new ... 2005. This is something that many doctors, scientists, and public ... questions remains: with fewer PSA tests being done, will there ... Dr. David Samadi, "Despite the efforts made ... remains the second leading cancer cause of death in men, ...
(Date:11/23/2015)... HONG KONG, Nov. 23, 2015 China Cord ... "Company"), China,s leading provider of cord blood collection, laboratory ... services, today announced its preliminary unaudited financial results for ... 2016 ended September 30, 2015. --> ... Highlights , Revenues for the second quarter of ...
(Date:11/23/2015)... 23, 2015 The royalty-free a ... to develop daclatasvir for 112 low- and ... --> --> The Medicines Patent ... C medicine, signing an agreement with Bristol-Myers Squibb for daclatasvir, ... multiple genotypes of the HCV virus.  The royalty-free licence will ...
(Date:11/23/2015)... Nov. 23, 2015  CryoLife, Inc. (NYSE: CRY ), ... cardiac and vascular surgery, announced today that it will participate ... Conference on Wednesday, December 2, 2015 at The New York ... Pat Mackin , President and Chief Executive Officer. ... Executive Officer. --> A live webcast of ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:11/9/2015)... ) ... "Global Law Enforcement Biometrics Market 2015-2019" ... ) has announced the addition of ... 2015-2019" report to their offering. ... ) has announced the addition of the ...
(Date:11/4/2015)... 2015 --> ... by Transparency Market Research "Home Security Solutions Market - Global ... - 2022", the global home security solutions market is expected to ... The market is estimated to expand at a CAGR ... 2022. Rising security needs among customers at homes, the ...
(Date:10/29/2015)... Minn. , Oct. 29, 2015   MedNet ... supports the entire spectrum of clinical research, is pleased ... Minnesota High Tech Association (MHTA) as one of only ... in the "Software – Small and Growing" category. The Tekne ... individuals who have shown superior technology innovation and leadership. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):