Navigation Links
Researchers prolong the plasma half-life of biopharmaceutical proteins
Date:9/21/2009

Many biopharmaceuticals comprise small proteins that are quickly eliminated from the body. Scientists at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) combine such small proteins with a kind of molecular balloon that swells and thus prolongs the half-life of the proteins in the body. The TUM spin-off XL-protein GmbH has now started to further develop this new technology with blockbuster potential.

People who suffer from hepatitis B are often treated with the tissue hormone interferon. However, there is a problem: Interferon is a very small protein, which is filtered from the blood via the kidneys after only a short time. For the patient this means a high-dose injection every other day to keep the effect of the substance from wearing off prematurely.

However, interferon stays in the body much longer when chemically coupled with a synthetic PEG (polyethylene glycol) molecule. PEG is a random coil long-chain polymer string that swells by adsorbing water. That way the PEG molecule becomes large enough that it does not fit through the fine pores of the kidneys the attached interferon remains in the circulatory system longer, and the patient will need an injection only every one to two weeks.

Using genetic engineering, TU Muenchen scientist Prof. Arne Skerra and his coworkers from the Chair of Biological Chemistry at the Center for Life and Food Sciences Weihenstephan have now developed an amino acid string that tangles up similarly to PEG and also swells in the presence of water. However, unlike many PEG compounds, there is no danger of this biological polymer accumulating in the body. In fact over an extended period of time it is discharged or biologically broken down. That happens because this amino acid string (polypeptide) consists of three of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids: proline, alanine and serine, or in short, PAS.

The protein substance interferon, which itself consists of amino acids, can thus be easily generated in "PASylated" form. In first trials with animals, TUM scientists established that PASyated interferon has a half-life in the blood that is prolonged by a factor of 60, which should allow a significant extension of dosing intervals during medicinal therapy.

A further advantage is the simplified biotechnological production: The DNA segments carrying the information for the PAS amino acid sequence and for the interferon can simply be attached to each other and then, for instance, used for transforming bacteria. The bacteria then produce the PASylated interferon in one piece, thus making much fewer production steps necessary in comparison with the chemical coupling of PEG. According to Skerra, "this will lead to a significant drop in production cost."

In principle all small proteins currently used as medication or in development in pharmaceutical companies for example, growth factors or functional antibody fragments can be PASylated. Thus there could be a huge market for the new technology. Consequently, Prof. Skerra and his team initiated the founding of a new biotech company, XL-protein GmbH (http://www.xl-protein.com), which started its operations last spring. "Our technology has the potential to give birth to a whole new generation of blockbuster medications," the TUM biochemist is convinced. Several of the new drugs are already at an advanced stage of preclinical development.


'/>"/>

Contact: Patrick Regan
presse@zv.tum.de
49-892-892-2743
Technische Universitaet Muenchen
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. Researchers improve ability to write and store information on electronic devices
2. Long-awaited international ethical guidelines for biobank researchers
3. CU researchers shed light on light-emitting nanodevice
4. Stevens researchers provide new information about mass spectrometry
5. Researchers measure carbon nanotube interaction
6. Researchers underscore limitations of genetic ancestry tests
7. ASU researchers improve memory devices using nanotech
8. UD researchers race ahead with latest spintronics achievement
9. Researchers outline structure of largest nonvirus particle ever crystallized
10. Ames Laboratory researchers solve fuel-cell membrane structure conundrum
11. Researchers use magnetism to target cells to animal arteries
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/29/2016)... , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Summit for Stem ... support the development of a patient-specific stem cell therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s ... of Dr. Jeanne Loring at The Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, CA. ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... , April 28, 2016 ... reports the Company,s CEO  was featured in an ... Enter When VCs Fear To Tread: http://www.lifescienceleader.com/doc/accelerators-enter-when-vcs-fear-to-tread-0001 ... magazine is an essential business journal ... from emerging biotechs to Big Pharmas. Their content ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... Inc., will hold an open house for regional manufacturers at its Maple Grove, ... from Tsugami, Okuma, Hardinge Group, Chiron and Trumpf. Almost 20 leading suppliers ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... Most ... devices with fingerprint recognition for secure access, voice recognition for hands-free communication, and ... consumers are interacting with biometrics technology today. But if they asked Joey ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:4/26/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the ...  report to their offering.  , ,     (Logo: ... forecast the global multimodal biometrics market to grow ... 2016-2020.  Multimodal biometrics is being implemented ... healthcare, BFSI, transportation, automotive, and government for controlling ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... April 13, 2016  IMPOWER physicians supporting Medicaid patients ... a new clinical standard in telehealth thanks to a ... the higi platform, IMPOWER patients can routinely track key ... body mass index, and, when they opt in, share ... visit to a local retail location at no cost. ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... PUNE, India , March 22, 2016 ... new market research report "Electronic Sensors Market for ... Fingerprint, Proximity, & Others), Application (Communication & ... and Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", ... consumer industry is expected to reach USD ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):