Navigation Links
Researchers outline structure of largest nonvirus particle ever crystallized

Researchers at UCLA's California NanoSystems Institute, the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have modeled the structure of the largest cellular particle ever crystallized, suggesting ways to engineer the particles for drug delivery.

The research study, which focuses on new engineered nanomaterial vaults for use as a drug-therapy vehicle, appears in the Nov. 27 edition of the peer-reviewed, open-access journal PLoS Biology, published by the Public Library of Science, and is available at

The team of researchers at UCLA is led by David Eisenberg and Leonard H. Rome of the departments of biological chemistry at the Geffen School of Medicine and the California NanoSystems Institute and associate researchers Daniel H. Anderson, Valerie A. Kickhoefer and Stuart A. Sievers. Eisenberg, Anderson and Sievers are also members of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the UCLAU.S. Department of Energy Institute for Genomics and Proteomics.

Vaults are large, barrel-shaped particles found in the cytoplasm of all mammalian cells; they may function in innate immunity. As naturally occurring nanoscale capsules, vaults may be useful to engineer as therapeutic delivery vehicles. For the study, the team of researchers proposed an atomic structure for the thin outer shell of the vault.

Using X-ray diffraction and computer modeling, the research team developed a draft atomic model for the major vault protein, which forms the shell-like enclosure of the vault.

"Our draft model is essentially an atomic-level vault with a completely unique structure, like a barrel with staves. It is unlike any other large structure found in nature," Rome said. "The outside of the vault structure is like an eggshell a continuous protective barrier with no gaps."

The shell is made up of 96 identical protein chains each made of 873 amino acid residues folded into 14 domains. Each chain forms an elongated stave of half the vault, as well as the cap of the barrel-like shell.

"These nanostructured vaults offer a human-friendly nanocontainer, like a molecular-level C-5A transport jet, with a cargo hold large enough to encompass a whole ribosome with its hundreds of proteins and nucleic acids, or enough drugs to control a cell," Eisenberg said.

The construction of the draft atomic model lays the foundation for further studies of vaults and will guide vault engineering projects focused on the targeted release of vault contents for drug delivery.


Contact: Jennifer Marcus
University of California - Los Angeles  

Related biology technology :

1. Researchers improve ability to write and store information on electronic devices
2. Long-awaited international ethical guidelines for biobank researchers
3. CU researchers shed light on light-emitting nanodevice
4. Stevens researchers provide new information about mass spectrometry
5. Researchers measure carbon nanotube interaction
6. Researchers underscore limitations of genetic ancestry tests
7. ASU researchers improve memory devices using nanotech
8. UD researchers race ahead with latest spintronics achievement
9. Anesiva Outlines Comprehensive Commercialization Plan for FDA Approved Product Zingo(TM)
10. New Initiative Has Shocking Effect: Thousands of Missourians with Abnormal Chromosome Structures Are Not Human
11. Two nanostructures are better than one
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Researchers outline structure of largest nonvirus particle ever crystallized
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... But unless it is bound to proteins, copper is also toxic to cells. ... at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) will conduct a systematic study of copper in ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... PUNE, India , November 24, 2015 ... to a new market research report "Oligonucleotide Synthesis Market ... Equipment), Application (PCR, Gene Synthesis, Diagnostic, DNA, RNAi), End-User ... to 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected ... 1,078.1 Million in 2015, at a CAGR of 10.1% ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... New York , November 24, 2015 ... to a recent market research report released by Transparency ... projected to expand at a CAGR of 17.5% during ... "Non-invasive Prenatal Testing Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, ... estimates the global non-invasive prenatal testing market to reach ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... are paramount. Insertion points for in-line sensors can represent a weak spot where ... InTrac 781/784 series of retractable sensor housings , which are designed to tolerate ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:11/17/2015)... PARIS , November 17, 2015 ... 17 au 19 novembre  2015.  --> Paris ... 2015.  --> DERMALOG, le leader de l,innovation ... à la fois passeports et empreintes sur la même ... pour les passeports et l,autre pour les empreintes digitales. ...
(Date:11/16/2015)... Nov 16, 2015  Synaptics Inc. (NASDAQ: ... solutions, today announced expansion of its TDDI product ... touch controller and display driver integration (TDDI) solutions ... These new TDDI products add to the previously-announced ... TD4302 (WQHD resolution), and TD4322 (FHD resolution) solutions. ...
(Date:11/12/2015)... 11, 2015   Growing need for low-cost, ... has been paving the way for use of ... discrete analytes in clinical, agricultural, environmental, food and ... used in medical applications, however, their adoption is ... to continuous emphasis on improving product quality and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):