Navigation Links
New rotors could help develop nanoscale generators
Date:5/27/2009

In collaboration with the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, scientists have investigated the rotation of molecules on a fixed surface to understand how they may help in the development of future rotor-based machinery at nanoscale level.

The research focused on rotating magnetic fields, which play an important part in machines like electric motors and generators. The difficulty for technology at the atomic scale is to replicate this property with rotors the size of small molecules. A number of rotating molecules have already been identified, but so far molecules have not been used to create rotating magnetic fields.

The researchers used a gold metal surface to anchor phtalocyanine molecules, which have a metallic centre, in a large array. The anchor point, a single gold atom on top of the gold surface attached to a nitrogen atom of the molecule, allowed the molecules to rotate just off-centre.

Professor Werner Hofer, from the University's School of Chemistry, explains: "The difficulty in creating molecular rotors is that molecules need a fixed anchor point and will often react with the surface you want to fix them to. A gold surface interacts very weakly with molecules; it moreover provides regular anchor points to attach single molecules, which then line up in large and well ordered arrays."

"The centre atoms, which are metallic, spin around the gold atoms creating an off-axis rotation. The beauty of phtalocyanines is that the centre can be functionalised with any metal atom; the research could then lead to the development of rotating magnetic fields at a very small scale."

Scientists believe that this could be the first step towards the fabrication of machines for the generation of currents at small scale.

The research is published in Physical Review letters.


'/>"/>

Contact: Samantha Martin
samantha.martin@liv.ac.uk
01-517-942-248
University of Liverpool
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1

Related biology technology :

1. Inexpensive plastic used in CDs could improve aircraft, computer electronics
2. Adipose-derived Stem Cells Could Help Traumatic Brain Injury Patients, Says Bio-Matrix Scientific Groups, Entest BioMedical Inc. Researcher
3. Self-assembled nanowires could make chips smaller and faster
4. Putting the squeeze on an old material could lead to instant on electronic memory
5. Connecting Materials Science With Biology, K-State Engineers Create DNA Sensors That Could Identify Cancer Using Material Only One Atom Thick
6. MIT: New method could lead to narrower chip patterns
7. MIT virus battery could power cars, electronic devices
8. Regional Biotech Association Warns Vermont Legislation Could Have Profound Negative Impact
9. MIT: New material could lead to faster chips
10. Can Obama Plan Tackle Diabetes Crisis? Epinex Test Could Help
11. Buckyballs could keep water systems flowing
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... The American Medical Informatics Association ... Data Sharing Policy. Specifically, the nation’s leading informatics experts, said data sharing plans ... policy. AMIA recommended that NIH earmark funding for researchers to produce and execute ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... Island, NY (PRWEB) , ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... at an exponential rate. The tremendous growth is accounted to two main factors. ... the table and the expanding network of vendors supplying FireflySci products all around the ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... YORK , Jan. 18, 2017 ... to reach USD 92.9 billion by 2025, according ... Inc. Pharmaceutical industry has been adaptive of the ... as early as 2002. Among the services outsourced, ... forerunners. For instance, Johnson & Johnson was the ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... PLAINVIEW, N.Y. , Jan. 18, 2017 ... pathology services, announces the formation of an Executive Committee ... 2017 and beyond. John Cucci , ... been promoted from Director of Business Development to ... in 2015, Mr. Cucci served in senior sales leadership ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:12/12/2016)... 12, 2016  Researchers at Trinity College, Dublin, ... by combining the material with Silly Putty. The mixture ... detector able to sense pulse, blood pressure, respiration, ... The research team,s findings were ... here:  http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6317/1257 ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... 2016  Singulex, Inc., the leader in Next Generation ... a license and supply agreement with Thermo Fisher Scientific, ... Singulex access to Thermo Scientific BRAHMS PCT (Procalcitonin), a ... used to diagnose systemic bacterial infection and sepsis and ... aid in assessing the risk of critically ill patients ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... TEL AVIV, Israel , December 7, 2016 ... year with the expansion of its patent portfolio, which grew to over ... , , ... led by its recently filed patent entitled " System, Device, ... which covers technology that enables device makers to forego costly hardware components ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):