Navigation Links
New atherosclerosis vaccine gives promising results

A new study by researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet shows that the immune defence's T cells can attack the "bad" LDL cholesterol and thereby cause an inflammation that leads to atherosclerosis. By producing a vaccine against the T cell receptors, the researchers have managed to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis in animals. The study is presented online in the distinguished periodical Journal of Experimental Medicine and is expected to be of considerable significance to the future treatment of atherosclerosis, heart attack and stroke.

Cholesterol is transported in the blood in LDL particles, which are a kind of fat drops that can accumulate in the walls of blood vessels. LDL activates the immune defence and triggers an inflammation in the blood vessels that leads to atherosclerosis (also known as arteriosclerosis). When the atherosclerotic plaque finally ruptures, a blood clot is formed that in turn can cause a heart attack or stroke.

It was previously thought that the inflammation in the blood vessels arises when the T cells react to oxidised LDL particles located in the atherosclerotic plaque. Now, however, the team at Karolinska Institutet has found that the opposite is true, namely that the T cells react to components in the normal LDL particles, and that they no longer recognise LDL once it has been oxidised.

"Since reactions to LDL can be dangerous, T cells are normally held in check by inhibitory signals," says Professor Gran K Hansson, who led the study. "The body's own control works well as long as the LDL keeps to the blood, liver and lymph glands. But when it accumulates in the artery wall, this inhibition is no longer enough, the T cells are activated and an inflammation arises."

Together with his research group at Karolinska Institutet he now presents a new principle for inhibiting atherosclerosis. Vaccination against the receptor that the T cells use to recognise LDL can block the immune reaction and reduce the disease by between 60 and 70 per cent. The vaccine has been successfully tested on animals and the researchers are now hoping to see if it can be developed into a treatment for patients with a high risk of myocardial infarction and stroke.

The researchers also now believe that their results explain why antioxidants are ineffective against cardiovascular disease when they have been tested in large clinical studies.

"If one takes antioxidants, one simply prevents the oxidation of LDL," says Professor Hansson. "It retains its ability to activate the T cells, and so the inflammation in the blood vessels can increase. This could give the opposite results to what one was hoping for."


Contact: Katarina Sternudd
Karolinska Institutet

Related biology technology :

1. Researchers identify a gene that may play a key role in atherosclerosis and other diseases
2. Arena Pharmaceuticals Announces Merck Discontinues Development of Investigational Niacin Receptor Agonist Program for Atherosclerosis
3. Resverlogix Commences Phase 2 Atherosclerosis Clinical Trial
4. AFFiRiS AG: Atherosclerosis Vaccine Development Receives EU Support
5. Research Published in Nature Medicine Shows Disruption of Chemokine Interactions Inhibits Atherosclerosis in Mice
6. Interleukin Genetics to Present New Findings at the 11th Cardiovascular Genomics and Atherosclerosis Symposium
7. Old and new therapies combine to tackle atherosclerosis
8. Crucell Announces New Award of $110 Million for Paediatric Vaccine Quinvaxem(R) by UNICEF to Support Vaccination Programs in the Developing World
9. New inhalable measles vaccine may lead to vaccines for other diseases
10. Archivel Farmas TB Vaccine May Cut Treatment Time From Nine Months to One
11. Pepscan Signs Partnering Agreement With Immunovo for its Therapeutic Vaccine Portfolio
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/26/2015)... England , November 26, 2015 ... medical device company specializing in imaging technologies, announced today that ... Commission as part of the Horizon 2020 European Union Framework ... out a large-scale clinical trial in breast cancer. ... , --> --> ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Studies reveal the differences in ... pave the way for more effective treatment for one of ...   --> --> Gum ... in cats, yet relatively little was understood about the bacteria ... been conducted by researchers from the WALTHAM Centre for Pet ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Muncie, IN (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 ... ... Aeronautics (AMA) and the Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals (OPBAP) has been formalized ... Mathewson and other AMA team leaders met with OPBAP leaders Capt. Karl Minter ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 24, 2015  Asia-Pacific (APAC) holds the third-largest ... market. The trend of outsourcing to low-cost locations ... higher volume share for the region in the ... margins in the CRO industry will improve. ... ( ), finds that the market earned ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:11/17/2015)... Paris from 17 th until ... from 17 th until 19 th November ... has invented the first combined scanner in the world which scans ... Until now two different scanners were required: one for passports ... on the same surface. This innovation is an ideal solution ...
(Date:11/12/2015)... golden retriever that stayed healthy despite having the gene ... new lead for treating this muscle-wasting disorder, report scientists ... and Harvard and the University of São Paolo in ... pinpoints a protective gene that boosts muscle regeneration, ... Children,s lab of Lou Kunkel , PhD, is ...
(Date:11/10/2015)... YORK , Nov. 10, 2015 ... to behavioral biometrics that helps to identify and ... fraud. Signature is considered as the secure and ... the identification of a particular individual because each ... more accurate results especially when dynamic signature of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):